1. Welcome to the CivilWarTalk, a forum for questions and discussions about the American Civil War! Become a member today for full access to all of our resources, it's fast, simple, and absolutely free!
Dismiss Notice
Join and Become a Patron at CivilWarTalk!
Support this site with a monthly or yearly subscription! Active Patrons get to browse the site Ad free!
START BY JOINING NOW!

Southern propaganda featuring miscegenation

Discussion in 'Civil War History - Secession and Politics' started by kepi, Mar 14, 2017.

  1. leftyhunter

    leftyhunter Captain

    Joined:
    May 27, 2011
    Messages:
    6,968
    Location:
    los angeles ca
    In the movie " Free State of Jones" his GG son was on trial but the D.A. let him go if he left Mississippi. This was approximately in 1948.
    Leftyhunter
     
    matthew mckeon likes this.

  2. (Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
  3. Pat Young

    Pat Young Colonel Forum Host

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    15,578
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    This one includes Abe Lincoln as one of the white friends of black women. Lincoln is on the lower left of the cartoon:

    misceg2.JPG
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2017
  4. Pat Young

    Pat Young Colonel Forum Host

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    15,578
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    A common fear, expressed in the cartoon above, was that when blacks and whites intermarried, white men might one day be the servants of the blacks:

    misceg3.JPG
     
    matthew mckeon likes this.
  5. Pat Young

    Pat Young Colonel Forum Host

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    15,578
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    Lincoln befriended mixed race couples in this hellscape:

    misc4.JPG

    Could one imagine Jefferson having anything to do with a mixed-race couple?
     
    matthew mckeon and MattL like this.
  6. Pat Young

    Pat Young Colonel Forum Host

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    15,578
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    The Miscegenation Ball attacked Republicans for holding a mixed-race political gathering in 1864:

    ball1.JPG ball2.JPG
     
    kepi likes this.
  7. Harvey Johnson

    Harvey Johnson Sergeant

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2014
    Messages:
    555
    Why do you say that?

    Regarding the Chinese Exclusion Acts the Densho Encyclopedia states explicitly,"Despite the willingness of entrepreneurs to hire Chinese laborers, anti-Chinese sentiment grew in reaction to the prevalence of beliefs that the immigrant workers were... a threat to...the purity of the white race."

    Also please note the following from post number 16 in the thread above:
    Moreover, if 19th century Republicans were truly interested in racial equality they would never have permitted the Chinese Exclusion Acts to take force. They enabled states to selectively deny Asians civil rights, including the right to vote.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2017
  8. Pat Young

    Pat Young Colonel Forum Host

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    15,578
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    Still not sure what the Chinese have to do with the OP. I think a threat on the views of the Chinese in the 1860s would be great. But it does not belong here unless you can show that it was used against the Republicans.

    BTW, I realize the OP is a bit more expansive than the title, but I think that miscegenation propaganda from Northern sources fits the OP.
     
    leftyhunter likes this.
  9. matthew mckeon

    matthew mckeon Brigadier General Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2005
    Messages:
    9,795
    Because dragging in the Chinese Exclusion Act was a distraction from not having any basis for his previous statements on another subject.
     
    leftyhunter and Joshism like this.
  10. kepi

    kepi First Sergeant

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2015
    Messages:
    1,350
    Location:
    United States of America
    I'm trying to imagine how a prominent slave owner would react to seeing something like this and can see how it is effective in the society of the time as propaganda. Is there a date of publication? I'm sure slaves weren't considered quite human and little more than farm animals by many given some of the writings I've come across. This truly shines a light on our racial problems today.
     
  11. John Hartwell

    John Hartwell Captain

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2011
    Messages:
    5,398
    Location:
    Central Massachusetts
    And Abolitionist literature did not restrict this condemnation to the South. Slavery corrupted its practitioners, North or South. William Goodell, in his survey, The American Slave Code (1853), wrote:

    "Even in Puritan New-England, seventy years ago, female slaves, in ministers' and magistrates' families, bore children, black or yellow, without marriage. No one inquired who their fathers were, and nothing more was thought of it than of the breeding of sheep or swine: We had the facts from those who well remembered them." (p.77)
     
    leftyhunter and kepi like this.
  12. kepi

    kepi First Sergeant

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2015
    Messages:
    1,350
    Location:
    United States of America
    Yes. I'm interested in how this was used by anyone in regard to the push for disunion or as political propaganda in the late 1850's to the end of the war
     
  13. kepi

    kepi First Sergeant

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2015
    Messages:
    1,350
    Location:
    United States of America

    Is there any context to how this cartoon was used? Which newspapers or magazines published it? When was is published?

    Thanks!
     
  14. Pat Young

    Pat Young Colonel Forum Host

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    15,578
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    These cartoons were primarily from 1863-1865 and were aimed at the Northern public to discredit the Republicans. However, the one you are discussing is from 1839. It is part of a three-cartoon series.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2017
    kepi likes this.
  15. Pat Young

    Pat Young Colonel Forum Host

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    15,578
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    kepi likes this.
  16. Pat Young

    Pat Young Colonel Forum Host

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    15,578
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    Edward Williams Clay was born in Philadelphia and lived there and in Delaware. He was a lawyer and an artist.
     
    kepi likes this.
  17. matthew mckeon

    matthew mckeon Brigadier General Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2005
    Messages:
    9,795
    Slavery, not family friendly, no matter where it exists.
     
  18. uaskme

    uaskme Corporal

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2016
    Messages:
    253
    The use of the race issue as a potent political weapon by the Democrats led many Republicans to reply in kind. Especially in the West, Republican spokesmen insisted that they, not the Democrats, were the real "white man's party," and they often vehemently denied any intention of giving legal or social equality to free negroes, The astute politician David Davis, Lincoln 's friend and adviser, insisted during the 1858 campaign than Republican orators "distinctly and emphatically disavow negro suffrage, negroes holding office, serving on juries and the like." When Democrats charged that antislavery spokesmen subordinated the rights of whites to those of Negroes, Republicans r Because they opposed Democratic

    responded that they hoped to keep the territories open to free white settlers by barring slavery. It required no effort to show, an Iowa Congressman wrote, that the Democratic, not the Republican party, "exalts and spreads Africans at the expense of the white race," Because they opposed Democratic plans to "flood Kansas and the other Territories with negro slaves," Republicans claimed "that republicans are the only white man's party in the country." And when Democrats accused them of favoring the intermixing of the races, Republicans responded that keeping the races separate by barring slavery from the territories would prevent this very intermixing, Free Soil Free Labor Free Men pp265-266

    This was the normal Republican response to the Black Republican or Amalgamation Charge. Such charges were not made toward the Democrats. It was used against all the anti Slavery Parties.
     
  19. MattL

    MattL Sergeant

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2015
    Messages:
    909
    Though this certainly was a common response, I'll also point out it wasn't exclusive. A good example of Kansas Republicans that tried to give ,what was very progressive to their time, rights to Blacks (and ban slavery) is the Leavenworth Constitution ratified May 18, 1858. It was rejected by the State Senate.

    http://www.kansasmemory.org/item/207410
    (text)
    http://www.kansasmemory.org/item/207410/text

    Summary from that page
    ----
    The Leavenworth Constitution was the most radical of the four constitutions drafted for Kansas Territory. The Bill of Rights refers to "all men" and prohibited slavery from the state. The word "white" did not appear in the proposed document and therefore would not have excluded free blacks from the state. Article XVI, Section 3 directed the general assembly to provide some protection for the rights of women. The Leavenworth Constitution was ratified on May 18, 1858 but the U.S. Senate did not act to approve the document. At the time of its creation, the separate pages of the Leavenworth Constitution were pasted together and rolled into one long roll. It still exists in this state today.
    ----

    It banned slavery and referred to "all men" making no distinction between, applying rights equally. It even gave some protection to women's rights.

    From the text

    ----
    All men are by nature equally free and independent, and have certain inalienable rights, among which are those of enjoying and defending life and liberty, acquiring, possessing and protecting property, and seeking and obtaining happiness and safety; and the right of all men to the control of their persons exists prior to law, and is inalienable
    ----

    It doesn't mention miscegenation, though it does have this

    ----
    The General Assembly shall not have power to enact special laws annulling the contract of marriage.
    ----

    Which I wonder if was intended to protect against laws preventing that?

    More context on that specific Convention and Constitution

    http://www.civilwaronthewesternborder.org/encyclopedia/leavenworth-constitution

    ----
    With language echoing the Declaration of Independence, the future state of Kansas considered the unprecedented measure of extending equal rights of citizenship to black males. Serving as an early example of Brandeisian thinking, wherein states, or in this case a territory, function as “laboratories of democracy,” the delegates who gathered in Leavenworth, Kansas, placed the enfranchisement of black males up for consideration a full decade before the federal government enacted the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Through the drafting of the Leavenworth Constitution, one territory crafted a guiding state charter promising the abolition of slavery, freedom of speech, freedom of worship “to the dictates of their own conscience,” and freedom to all men regardless of skin color.
    ----

    My 3rd great grandfather Hood S. Baker was elected a delegate to this for Sumner in Atchison County. He approved and signed it as H. S. Baker.

    Just pointing out that in places like Kansas there were quite a few different views... There were 4 different Constitutions during this period reflecting that split.
     
  20. Kenneth Almquist

    Kenneth Almquist Corporal

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2014
    Messages:
    291
    Curiously, I've seen only one instance of propaganda which referenced an actual marriage. From the Newbern weekly progress (Newbern, N.C.), 23 April 1861, page 1 column 6:

    Its Practical workings

    The following from a New York paper shows some of the the practical workings of Black Republicanism in that state:

    The Utica papers contain the announcement of the marriage of a young colored man to a white servant girl, which created great excitement in that city. The parties went to Rome where a Welsh clergyman performed the ceremonies. Such events are not unknown of in those Abolition diggins'. A year or two ago, the young daughter of a wealthy Abolitionists, in Onondaga County, run off with a negro, who was as black as the ace of spades, and as nasty as a pole-cat.​

    The reference to “Rome” in the story is presumably a reference to Rome, NY rather than Rome, Italy. The newspaper favored succession, but at the time this article was published North Carolina was still in the Union.

    Except for this one grammatically challenged article, the propaganda just assumes without any evidence whatsoever that a Republican victory will some how inspire white women to marry black men. For some reason, a few papers considered birth and marriage statistics for Boston to be national news. For example, Houma Ceres. (Houma, Parish of Terrebonne, La.), 14 March 1857, page 1, column 3, gives us this information, and if we read all the way to the end of the story we learn that there were 13 interracial marriages in Boston in 1856. But this information is presented without any comment or emphasis.
     
    Eric Calistri, leftyhunter and kepi like this.
  21. uaskme

    uaskme Corporal

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2016
    Messages:
    253
    This is being called Southern Propaganda because it is anti Relublican.It is being done by Northers who are anti Republican. Lincoln won a narrow victory in 1860. He won 40 percent of the national Vote. So 60 percent of the Vote was anti Republican Nationally. I don't think Southerners ran a NY or Boston Paper.

    Many Northerners were Prejudiced against Catholics. Republicans were. Fremont was accused as being a Catholic in his Presidential Bid. So that would explain the dig about Rome. Politics is Politics.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2017

(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
Loading...

Share This Page


(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)