Southern Fried Nostalgia & Fandom: Glory (1989) Review (Hollywood Vs History)

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SouthernFriedOtaku

Retired User
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May 11, 2019
A pro-Southern blogger with a somewhat neutral review of the 1989 landmark feature film, Glory.
I found it to be pretty fair and balanced, and a good comparison between history and Hollywood.

 

John Hartwell

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Aug 27, 2011
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Central Massachusetts
A decent, fair review.

I would say, however, that if you let yourself get distracted by petty historical inaccuracies, you'll miss out on a whole lot of a movie's true purpose ... entertainment. The reviewer's first, uncritical viewing of Glory as a teenager, was the most significant in formulating his reaction to it. We'd all like to see more historical accuracy in movies, but, if we allow it to interfere with our enjoyment of a film, we are the losers.

And, he didn't even mention the little slave boy with the digital watch!
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Bruce Vail

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Jul 8, 2015
The movie was a great acheivment. I can't bear any additional viewings, however, mainly because of the overdone soundtrack.

I'd love to see another Civil War movie about the African-American soldiers. Maybe one where the central character is actually a black man...
 
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SouthernFriedOtaku

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May 11, 2019
The movie was a great acheivment. I can't bear any additional viewings, however, mainly because of the overdone soundtrack.

I'd love to see another Civil War movie about the African-American soldiers. Maybe one where the central character is actually a black man...
I personally enjoyed the movie. It was good despite the historical inaccuracies which aren't big enough to really worry about compared to something like Braveheart.
 

Carronade

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Aug 4, 2011
Location
Pennsylvania
One minor thing puzzles me a bit; Shaw asks his friend to be "second in command" - uses those exact words IIRC - yet Forbes is only a major. Maybe they just thought "Major Forbes" sounded cooler or punchier than "Lieutenant Colonel".
 
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James N.

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One minor thing puzzles me a bit; Shaw asks his friend to be "second in command" - uses those exact words IIRC - yet Forbes is only a major. Maybe they just thought "Major Forbes" sounded cooler or punchier than "Lieutenant Colonel".
They seemed to have only a foggy idea of things like that, but we worked it to our advantage: Dale Fetzer who was in charge of the reenactors and actually gave all the military commands onscreen (other than scripted ones) "decided" to make himself the lieutenant colonel, placing himself realistically in the chain of command in a position where he could legitimately give orders to the formation without having to do it outside the camera. For example, in the review in "Boston" Fetzer is seen mounted between Broderick and Elwes who all salute as they pass the reviewing stand. Each individual company was "commanded" by reenactors who knew infantry drill and repeated or gave commands to each of their companies as the need arose. (That was my and the late Matt Murdzak's function in the background company during the entire shoot.)
 
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James N.

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glory_5oTIKU-35451.jpg

Interesting, thanks....now that you mention it, I don't recall any junior officer characters/movie actors, now we know why.
No, there were a few - it's just that since they weren't reenactors they had little or nothing to do. A prime example was Donovan Leitch, Jr., son of the 1960's British rocker Donovan, who can easily be recognized by his ridiculously large hat, seen at right in this publicity still. He and a couple of other similarly young and fresh-faced actors were included in a few scenes, and Donovan even gets a "death scene" at Battery Wagner. They were intended to represent the "green" company officers - hence the need for Sgt. Major Mulcahy - but were of course incapable of actually leading any of the companies! In this scene, Dale Fetzer can be seen standing immediately behind Jihimi Kennedy aiming the rifle.
 
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