Sometimes, life just goes on...

grace

Sergeant
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#1
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Regardless of the circumstances around different families and communities, something always goes on: Life.

From helping little ones get ready day in and day out, remembering someone who's passed on, getting the crops in for the winter...it's easy to forget that life honestly just went on.

Two vivid examples of how families "ignored" the war are in the very first Little House book and in the lesser-known Caddie Woodlawn. Both take place very close to the Civil War, yet the children go merrily about their day. The parents are a little less merry, but the cycle of living goes on. As it always does when you live close to the land.

Something to think about...
 

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JPK Huson 1863

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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#5
Interesting, thank you! Does seem so studiously ignored, could be purposeful. There's good foundation for your theory ( IMO ). Hale still gets accused of the same thing. She hadn't- especially early in the war Godey's got into it- there's a cover depicting notable women of compassion for instance. Topic does vanish late war. Seems maybe the same thing, had to be somewhere you could escape it.

Wait a minute. You know those long novelettes inside each issue? No war in those. Heroines engaged with plenty of princes, British lords, dashing ship's captains and the usual dastardly villains but they weren't in uniform. You may have something here. Kind of nice, isn't it?
 
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#6
Endeavors that the guardians of home were known to accomplish, besides household chores, tended to community efforts for sewing flags of presentation, uniforms, etc. Many here in the south had to resort to visiting the military commander of their city and beg for food, the times becoming so destitute. The army would hand out what they would, but look at the bread strike in Richmond. The ladies banded together, and I cannot believe any were left alone. The loneliness is attributable to the soldier being gone to war.
Lubliner.
 

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