Sherman Some of Sherman's Boys

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The officer at the left is the unlikely-named Albion Tourgee, postwar writer and novelist. (Albion is an old name meaning England or English.)
Albion Winegar Tourgée — He chose to be photographed here with a bit of hardtack in hand.

Here’s a bit more on Albion Tourgée:

Albion was born in 1838. Albion Tourgée, in the 1870 census, was a Judge in the Superior Court of North Carolina, USA. In 1880, he is a lawyer in Denver, Colorado, USA. In 1892, he is a judge in New York.

He was an early civil rights activist, litigating unsuccessfully for the plaintiff Homer Plessy in the famous segregation case Plessy v. Ferguson (1896) before the Supreme Court. Tourgée is credited with introducing the phrase "color-blind justice".

This obituary highlights a purpose driven life:

"Altoona Tribune", (Altoona, Pennsylvania), 17-Nov-1905, page 9

Ashes of Albion W. Tourgée, Defender of the Negro, Buried at Mayville, NY

Mayville, November 15. -- The snowstorm that swept the Chautauqua hills yesterday and coated their green sides with a mantle of white, did not prevent Mayville from turning out en masse to pay its last tribute to its first citizen -- Albion Winegar Tourgée, soldier, jurist, statesman and man of letters.

Though the noted man died in Bordeaux, France, last May, where he represented the United States as its consul, memorial services were held yesterday in the Methodist Episcopal church, where he worshiped every Sunday before he went abroad in 1897.

In yesterday's assembly that gathered to do honor to Judge Tourgée's memory were several negroes who came to pay their last tribute to the man who has said and done so much in defense of the negro since the days of Sumter. Booker T. Washington was expected to attend, but he sent a wire of consolation to Mrs. Tourgée in which he said engagements in the west prevented him coming to Mayville. Corporal James Tanner, commander-in-chief of the Grand Army of the Republic, set a telegram of regret.

Judge Tourgée's body was cremated in France, and the ashes were delayed between New York and Buffalo so they did not arrive in Mayville until after the memorial services. They were buried later by the Grand Army post with military honors.

Albion Wingar Tourgée was best known to the world as an author who defended the negro. He was born in Williamsfield, O., on May 2, 1838, the son of a farmer of moderate means. He was a young man just completing his education for admission to the bar when President Lincoln called for volunteers. He enlisted as a private in the Twenty-seventh New York Volunteer infantry. In the first battle of Bull Run, during the retreat of the federal army, Judge Tourgée was crushed between a gun carriage and an ambulance and so seriously injured that he was discharged for disability. He came home and for a year walked on crutches. During that time the federal arms had met with more reverses -- it was a disastrous year for the union -- and he felt that he must go back and serve his country.

On crutches he went to the governor of Ohio and asked for a commission to recruit a company. He walked to the executive mansion on crutches and there threw them away that the governor might not see he was physically unfit for duty. He got his commission as a first lieutenant and recruited a company which he took to the front. He was mustered out in 1864, after having been confined in Libby, Andersonville and other prisons, and set to work to finish his law studies. He was admitted to the Ohio bar.

During the reconstruction period he went to North Carolina with his wife, where he was elected a judge of the superior court. It was while there, disheartened and discouraged with the turn things were taking, he wrote his famous Fool's Errand, which he signed One of the Fools. When the administration changed Judge Tourgée went to Denver and later came to New York. He wrote Bricks Without Straw and other works dealing with the negro question and was a champion of equal rights. In Chicago, he co-operated with a movement to organize a citizen's rights association, which he hoped would induce both white and black men to insist on rights for the negro. The movement failed.

It was while in Chicago that he wrote the famous Siva Letters, which appeared regularly in the Chicago Inter Ocean. They were written during Grover Cleveland's first term as president and caused no end of comment.

It cannot be said Judge Tourgée's health began to fail at any particular time, for he never was free from pain from the moment he was injured on the battlefield until death relieved him. In 1881, having resolved not to work longer actively in law, he looked for a quiet country town where he might pursue his literary work. He selected Mayville and settle there with his family in 1881. He lived in a large yellow house on the main street. Yesterday an American flag, draped with crepe, hung limp from the quaint old veranda.

In 1897 it became plain that if Judge Tourgee's life were to be prolonged a change of climate would be necessary. In that year Mrs. Tourgée went to President McKinley, who told her to select a position in the consular service for her husband. Bordeaux was the post decided on and there the judge and his family went in 1897.

In France Judge Tourgée did not escape his fame as the champion of the African and he was a prominent figure in literary and social circles there. After seven years of service which were marked with an excellent record, he succumbed to the complication of diseases and passed away.

His life and words proved that he lived for a purpose. His motives were unselfish and loud as may have been popular acclaim and bitter as was the criticism from those who did not share his views on the race question -- he never faltered from his object and never receded a point on his views on the rights of negroes.

That he was a man among men, a champion of humanity, a great-hearted patriot and a philanthropist the world can ill afford to lose, was the tribute laid at his bier yesterday by the people of Mayville. The Methodist Episcopal church and the Episcopal church united in memorial services which were held in the edifice of the former.

The Rev. B. A. Ginader, the Rev. John Disart, both of Mayville, conducted the services, assisted by the Rev. Dr. Brush, formerly of Mayville, but now of Buffalo. Representatives of the negro clergy spoke their words of tribute for the great service Judge Tourgée performed for their race.

The service was simple. There was singing by the church choir, addresses by the clergy, the benediction -- it was the end of a great life.

Mayville's business places closed during the services and a reception committee, of which E. C. Green was chairman, attended to the visitors.
 
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Thanks for the ID - Wallace certainly has another famous Scots name too. Welcome to the forums!
Here’s a nice bio on William Wallace that I found associated with an auction lot of items from Wallace’s life and service.

Biography From Auction Lot​

Civil War Archive of Captain William Wallace, 105th, Sold For $7,500 (​(https://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/8239416_74-civil-war-archive-of-captain-william-wallace-105th)

Capt. William Wallace Archive, 1862-1865. Lot of approx. 115 items, including 100 letters, plus 4 cased images, 3 paper photographs, 3 books, framed marriage license, GAR certificate, presentation cane, pair of binoculars, and wooden box.

Soldiers like William Wallace were the backbone of the Union army in the west. A native of Ireland, William Wallace was a 21-year-old clerk in Ashtabula County, Ohio, when he enlisted in the 105th Ohio Infantry in 1862. From the beginning, he stood out from his peers for his intellect and bearing, and despite his youth, he was appointed 1st Sergeant of Co. I. Through fortune and misfortune alike, within a few months he had earned a commission to 2nd Lieutenant, and four months later, in May 1863, to Captain. Nor was Wallacethe only talent in the regiment: among his fellow officers was Albion Tourgée, a close friend (mentioned in several letters) who later became a Radical Republican politician, civil rights activist, and novelist remembered as the lead (and unsuccessful) counsel in the seminal case Plessy v. Ferguson in which the Supreme Court authorized the doctrine of separate but equal.

Barely a week after mustering into the service in August 1862, the 105th Ohio were rushed into the field in Covington, Ky., where they were armed with Springfield rifles, and by mid-October they were thrown into their first major engagement with the enemy: Perryville. The experience was chastening. "Since the battle," Wallace wrote, "I am the only sergant fit for duty in the company and 1st Lieut. And I am acting orderly sergant..." Later he added a long accounting of losses in the battle, including a list of friends taken prisoner or wounded, estimating at least 50 killed and 200 wounded in the 105th, though he added "Of Rebles, by the number of them laying on the field the next day, would say 2,000 killed their wounded the had removed in the night... and as for the 105th doing their duty the number killed and wound in our Regt will give you some idea. One thing is certin that we wont properly taken into the Battle. The boys all have seen one Battle field and are anxious for another trial, but I don't think their will be any more large Battle in Kentucky this fall, as Brag with his large army is routed." Just two months into their service, Wallace complained that between casualties in battle and illness, the regiment of 1,050 men could muster barely 250.

An uncompromising Unionist, Wallace was a keen observer of the local population in the south, recording moments that struck him as at once tragic and funny. When passing through Glasgow, Ky., where Confederate Gen. John Morgan's guerrilla band was recruited, he wrote: "Glasgow is a secesh place. When our advance of cavalry went into town, they supposed that they were Morgan Gurrillie Band and the women was all out to see their husbands, as Morgan recruited 200 men when through here before. But they soon found themselves disappointed...." In a later letter describing foraging near Glasgow: "it is a pretty cool business. We would go where we would hear of some southern sympathizers and drive up the teams to their corn crib, fill all they had into the wagons and at the same time the boys would be in the house getting what we could, chickens and turkeys. Fares rather hard when we solders are round. The people daren't say one word. When we would get our wagons full. We would give them a receipt for the number of loads of corn 'on the conditions' if they should prove themselves union men they will get some pay, but we are careful not to go anywhere where Union men... is good enough for the secesh, they are all pretty much secesh."

The 105th, however, was still learning military discipline and not all went well for them. Near Murfreesboro, Tenn., at the end of January, Wallace wrote of a disgraceful incident, when 150 men from the regiment were captured by Confederate cavalry when officers (including Lt. Albion Tourgée) failed to deploy men as skirmishers. "Before they got out of the wagons, they [Confederates] were right among them. They had our Army Overcoats on and our men did not no them till the were on them. 20 of the company got away and are back in camp to tell us the disgraceful story of our boys..." Coincidentally, it appears, at about this time, Wallace's Lieutenant resigned due to illness, opening a spot for a commission that Wallace filled.

From this point forward, the fate of the 105th improved and the letters contain a steady stream of content relative to the regiment's military experiences. Wallace provides a nice running account of the Tullahoma Campaign during the summer 1863: "We expected a fight at Manchester or Shelbyville and certainly at Tullahoma, all of which the have Fortified but all we had was heavy skirmishing all the way. Our Division had at pretty hot time at Hoovers Gap but our Mounted Brigade done the most of it as they take the advance... the 7th day found us around Tullahoma, our forces all massed for an attack on the 8. The 6th & 7th we had very heavy & hot skirmishing with the enemy. They had received 10 thousand reinforcements from Georgia and Bragg blowed to his men that he was going to capture our entire army, but Gen. R[osecrans] got round in his rear and Bragg came pretty near getting into bag. -- found out old Rosa was not going to sacrifice his brave men charging on the fortifications, but was going to get round & cut off his retreat or base of supplies and Bragg had to retreat... they retreated in great confusion. We captured 3 large siege guns, 2 thousand bags of meal and any amount of tents..." Much more on scorched earth policy and driving the enemy before them.

At the bloodbath of Chickamauga, Wallace and his regiment distinguished themselves, helping to prevent a complete collapse: "The enemy had great advantage over us in position and numbers. Bragg was reinforced by troops from Lee 2 Corps, and he had men enough to engage our whole forces and flank us in both sides. It was nothing but a roar of musketry from morning till dark. The enemy fought desperate charges in columns of 6 & 8 deep. It will be a sad day to many friends at home, many a brave man fell their on that bloody ground, lay there northerner & southerner side by side; charge after charge was made.... [the next day] Our Regt was laying as a reserve when Maj. Gen. J.J. Reynolds comdg our Division rode up and told the Maj to have the 105 fix Bayonets as the[y] were breaking our lines, then came the order to charge. With a yell like death we rushed forward double quick, charged and captured one Brigadear General Adams, one Captain, 27 men, but with heavy loss.... Some hard fighting. Our Regt has been complimented very much for our splendid charge. My orderly was severely wounded; how I came out without a scratch is one of Gods own mysteries, as I think I did not say boys go on, but boys come on. Our loss in killed, wounded & missing will be near 10,000 to guess at it..." Subsequent letters from the siege of Chattanooga discuss the sparse rations and hard conditions of the fall.

Though again much depleted -- Capt. Wallace reported only 20 privates fit for duty -- the 105th took part in the Atlanta Campaign, moving to Ringgold, Ga., in February. His letters include descriptions of the nearly constant combat in the campaign, including the Battle of Resaca, Kenesaw Mountain, and Peach Tree Creek July 19-20, about which Wallace wrote "On the 20th the enemy charged Gen. Hooker, Howard, and the left of Palmer's lines, and were repulsed with heavy loss. Our loss was estimated at 2,000 and that of the enemys at 6,000.... The rebels massed their forces on McPherson left and as he had previously sent his cavalry forces to cut their rail road from Atlanta to Macon. They getting wind of the same massed on his extreme left and at first turned his left capturing 16 pieces of artillery and our breast works. Our men rallied and charged the enemy retaking 11 guns and our works again.... We lost one of our best and bravest Generals, Major General McPherson was killed yesterday rallying his men on the very front lines...."

Occupied in the Siege of Atlanta for a month, he described the final days of Sherman's brilliant campaign to take the city. On Aug 31, he wrote: "The Army under Sherman broke camp on the morning of the 26th Inst. and we are striking for the rear of the Rebel Army at Atlanta. We have crossed the Atlanta and Mobile R.R. and thoroughly tore and destroyed it and are now about 20 miles southwest of Atlanta. We are within 4 miles of the Macon Rail Road which is the only road now available to them. I expect some sharp work for possession of it, but don't think we will get an open field fight our of them, but this is a bold move in Gen. Sherman as we broke loose from our communications, but ten or 15 days will tell what the results will be..." He followed with another long and detailed letter describing Sherman's masterful beating of Hood at Jonesboro and the fall of Atlanta: "As soon as Hood recd the news of Hardee being cleaned out he blew up 80 car loads of ammunition and destroyed 6 locomotives Blowing up the Arsenals and evacuating Atlanta moving to our left and joining Hardee in a strong fortified position 8 miles south of here. The army is at that point confronting the Rebels. But the 14th A.C. & 20 Corps under Gen. Slocum was left at the forts round the Chattahooche river Rail Road Birdh so as soon as Hood left they could occupy Atlanta. We expect to march in the morning. Some says Sherman is going back to Atlanta to rest his weary Army which we need very much..."

As depleted as the regiment was, the 105th nevertheless continued under Sherman on the March to the Sea and March through the Carolinas, apparently enjoying themselves immensely, if Wallace is an indication. < The article goes on to describe the items to be auctioned off.>
 

Si Klegg

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Jul 13, 2018
Location
Bedford UK
He seems to have enjoyed the thread so far ...

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To finish out the men in the Soldier’s Three photo...

From The Story of a Thousand by Albion Winegar Tourgee​

Reuben George Morgaridge was born in Morgan Co., O., May 1, 1838. He was attending school at Conneault, O., when the war broke out, and on August 2, 1862, he abandoned his books and enlisted as a private in the 105th, being mustered in as a corporal, and was promoted successively to 1st Sergt., 2d Lieut., 1st Lieut. and Captain. His service was identical with that of the regiment, as he was with it during its entire term of service. On being mustered out, he resumed his studies and graduated at the Eastman Business College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y., the following year. During the oil excitement, he was at Shamburg, Pithole and Miller Farm, serving as postmaster at the latter place. In 1870 he moved to Titusville, remaining there three years, going thence to Corry where he has since resided, being engaged in the clothing and furnishing business.

—— A later newspaper article i

“The Evening Republican”, (Meadville, Pennsylvania), 10 Feb 1913, page 1

BROKE RIBS FALLING DOWN STAIRS AT HOME(Special to The Tribune-Republican)CORRY, Feb. 10. — R. G. Morgaridge an aged resident of this city, fell down stairs at his home yesterday. He broke several ribs and suffered from the shock. Physlcians believe he will recover.

— — but the fall must have been the beginning of the end for him as he passed away about a month later, March 24, 1913.
 

Si Klegg

Corporal
Joined
Jul 13, 2018
Location
Bedford UK
From left to right - private Richard Ogle, private William Gooch, and his brother private Thomas Gooch all of the 23rd Missouri Infantry. The regiment was mustered in for three years in Sept., 1861. They were present at Shiloh, the Siege of Atlanta, Battle of Jonesborough, the March to the Sea, and the Carolinas Campaign. The regiment lost a total of 236 men during service; 2 officers and 57 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded, 4 officers and 173 enlisted men died of disease.

View attachment 366428
Super clear but obviously reversed image, with yet another variation of 'Parade Rest', this time with the right hand dropped to sort of midway between the first and second band. Maybe it's because they're equipped with m1842 'Pumpkin Slingers'.

Such an excellent image taken at Benton Barracks in St. Louis (that backdrop is on many images of western soldiers.) Turns out to have been taken while they were waiting to be exchanged on parole in the Summer of 1862 after being captured with General Prentiss and the remainder of his Division at the Hornet's Nest at Shiloh.

I'd hazard a guess at them having been re-equipped once they arrived in St Louis, seeing as they all have new frock coats. forage caps and what looks like - unusually for western soldiers - dark blue trousers. No doubt their original kit got some rough handling at Shiloh and also to and from Camp Oglethorpe in Macon, Georgia where the majority were held before being sent back to St Louis.
 
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Color bearer of the 105th Ohio Infantry posing on Lookout Mountain.

View attachment 172087
The soldier in the picture is Corporal Andrew Geddes.

Corporal Andrew Geddes served in the United States Civil War.
Enlisted: August 5, 1862
Mustered out: June 3, 1865
Side: USA
Regiment(s): Co. H, 105th Regiment,_Ohio_Infantry

The Story of a Thousand by Albion Winegar Tourgée, pages 279-280 and Appendices published by S. McGerald & Son, 1896​

Color Sergeant Andrew Geddes carried the colors of the 105th in every march and battle in which the regiment engaged from the time they were first presented about the middle of January, 1863, until the close of the war. Though the colors were literally shot to rags, the staff struck by bullets several times and his clothes cut by them more than once, he was never once touched and still survives, an honored citizen of Philadelphia, Pa. The picture given above is from a photograph of him and the colors taken on Lookout Mountain soon after its capture.”

Enlisted in to Company H of the 105th Ohio Volunteer Infantry on August 5, 1862 at age 24 as Corporal. He was wounded at the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain on June 18, 1864. He was mustered out at the end of the war.

Report of the Annual Reunion of the 105th Regiment, O.V.I.

Listed on page 19 of this booklet as a Surviving Member, living at 4963 Torr Ave., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Co., Pennsylvania.
 
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Joined
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Some officers of the 105th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Mustered in to service Aug. 20, 1862, they had a long list of engagements including: Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Resaca, Kennesaw Mtn., Peachtree Creek, Atlanta, the March to the Sea, and the Carolinas Campaign.

View attachment 175253
From left to right: 1st Lieutenant Albion Winegar Tourgée, Captain William Wallace, Captain Reuben George Morgaridge
 
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