Uniforms Soldiers wearing green wreaths?

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
Aug 25, 2012
When the First Michigan Three Month Volunteer Infantry Regiment mustered out of service in August of 1861 one of the Detroit newspapers stated "each soldier being crowned with a beautiful green wreath provided by the ladies of Detroit." I take this does not mean had a Christmas style wreath about their necks but more of a crown like wreath akin to what Roman heroes wore. Did soldiers the ladies did not much care for receive a wreath made from position ivy?

On a more serious note, how would a soldier wear a wreath with his cap? Say I wanted to do an image of the returning soldiers, how should I depict these "green wreaths"?
 

Georgia

Sergeant
When the First Michigan Three Month Volunteer Infantry Regiment mustered out of service in August of 1861 one of the Detroit newspapers stated "each soldier being crowned with a beautiful green wreath provided by the ladies of Detroit." I take this does not mean had a Christmas style wreath about their necks but more of a crown like wreath akin to what Roman heroes wore. Did soldiers the ladies did not much care for receive a wreath made from position ivy?

On a more serious note, how would a soldier wear a wreath with his cap? Say I wanted to do an image of the returning soldiers, how should I depict these "green wreaths"?
Good question. I have seen illustrations of sprigs of what appeared to be green boxwood tucked into the band of their caps. An “Olympic style laurel wealth” is what I think of when I read the description your shared.
Think anyone has any personal correspondence describing it more clearly or photos ?
 

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
Aug 25, 2012
Would it have been appropriate for their caps to have been removed and to accept a laurel style wreath?
Perhaps that is what was done.
Good question. I have seen illustrations of sprigs of what appeared to be green boxwood tucked into the band of their caps. An “Olympic style laurel wealth” is what I think of when I read the description your shared.
Think anyone has any personal correspondence describing it more clearly or photos ?

If the State of Michigan library was open (shut down due to COVOD) I would go see what the other Detroit newspaper says. I was thinking of the "wreath" being more of a sprig than a wreath.
 

7thWisconsin

Sergeant Major
Joined
Nov 21, 2014
I would guess they were some sort of 19th century approximation of a Roman victor's wreath. Probably just worn around your hat. They wouldn't have lasted more than a day or two. "The laurel wreath is ready now/ to place upon his loyal brow..."
 
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