Soldier's Vote Election 1864 New York Times Coverage

Zack

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Came across this archived article in the New York Times. It is dated November 12, 1864
https://www.nytimes.com/1864/11/12/archives/how-the-soldiers-vote.html

The article is a partial return of the soldier's vote during the 1864 Presidential Election. Because the author did not want to give General Lee an accurate count of the strength of federal infantry regiments, he instead simply conveyed the majority for each candidate. For example:

GENERAL RESULTS IN THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC.
Lincoln majorities..............................3,412
McClellan majorities........................... 198
Majority for Lincoln.........................3,215

MARYLAND.

In the four regiments constituting the Maryland Brigade the majority for Lincoln is 1,190.

NEW-HAMPSHIRE.

I have results in three New-Hampshire regiments in the Ninth Corps:

Lincoln majority
Sixth.............................................81
Ninth..............................................82
Eleventh...........................................88
Total........................................243

To the courtesy of Col. E.L. DANA, One Hundred and Forty-third Pennsylvania, I am indebted for results in three Wisconsin regiments of the First Brigade, Third Division, Fifth Corps:

Lincoln majority.
Second.......................................... 69
Sixth...........................................102
Seventh.......................................107
Total....................................278

To the Second Wisconsin belongs the distinction of having polled the smallest number of McClellan votes of any regiment yet reported.


Here's my question - what exactly does this mean? What is a "Majority for Lincoln" number? What's the difference between "Lincoln majorities" and "Majority for Lincoln."

My best guess is that it means the difference - Lincoln received, for example, 69 more votes in the Second Wisconsin than McClellan did.

And then the army wide numbers are "in the regiments where Lincoln won the majority, he received 3,412 more votes. In the regiments where McClellan won the majority, he received 198 more votes."

Am I reading this right?
 

Lubliner

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I think so. I think the typesetter interchanged Majority with Majorities, as he set the copy of what a writer wrote quickly. I do the same thing sometimes. You are correct on the numbers.
Lubliner.
 

Zack

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Los Angeles, California
GENERAL RESULTS IN THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC.
Lincoln majorities..............................3,412
McClellan majorities........................... 198
Majority for Lincoln.........................3,215

ohhhh okay. And I think in this section it means:

Of the regiments who voted for Lincoln, he had 3,412 more votes.

Of the regiments who voted for McClellan, he had 198 more votes

And (since 3412-198 is 3214) across the army as a whole Lincoln received 3,215 more votes than in this partial return. Not as huge of a gap as I was expecting but this is a partial return.
 

unionblue

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Lubliner

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I don't know if some of you have seen this book but it is the latest I found on the subject.

Emancipation, the Union Army, and the Reelection of Abraham Lincoln, by Jonathan W. White
I think the last line from the Gettysburg Address was still ringing in their ears and clinched the nomination for him;

"...It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us -- that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion -- that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain -- that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom -- and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth."

Lubliner.
 
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