Soldiers' National Monument (Gettysburg)

Soldiers' National Monument

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Farragutful, Sept 2017
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MONUMENT PROFILE
  • Battlefield: Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania
  • Location: Soldiers' National Cemetery
  • Map Coordinates: +39° 49' 11.28", -77° 13' 52.32"

MONUMENT DETAILS
  • Artists:
    • Sculptor: Randolph Rogers
    • Designer: James Goodwin Batterson
    • Designer: George W. Keller
  • Cornerstone Laid: July 4, 1865
  • Dedicated: July 1, 1869
  • Dimensions: Sculpture: H. 60 ft.
    • Base: W. 25 ft. x D. 25 ft.
  • Description:
The design of the monument, as executed by Mr. J. G. Batterson, of Hartford, Connecticut, is intended to be purely historical, telling its own story with such simplicity that any discerning mind will readily comprehend its meaning and purpose.​
The superstructure is sixty feet high, and consists of a massive pedestal, twenty-five feet square at the base, and is crowned with a colossal statue representing the Genius of Liberty. Standing upon a three-quarter globe, she raises with her right hand the victor's wreath of laurel, while with her left she gathers up the folds of our national flag under which the victory has been won. Projecting from the angles of the pedestal are four buttresses, supporting an equal number of allegorical statues representing, respectively, War, History, Peace, and Plenty.​
War is personified by a statue of the American soldier, who, resting from the conflict, relates to History the story of the battle which this monument is intended to commemorate.​
History, in listening attitude, records with stylus and tablet the achievements of the field and the names of the honored dead.​
Peace is symbolized by a statue of the American mechanic, characterized by appropriate accessories.​
Plenty is represented by a female figure, with a sheaf of wheat and fruits of the earth, typifying peace and abundance as the soldier's crowning triumph.​
The main die of the pedestal is octagonal in form, panelled upon each face. The cornice and plinth above are also octagonal, and are heavily moulded. Upon this plinth rests an octagonal moulded base bearing upon the face, in high relief, the national arms. The upper die and cap are circular in form, the die being encircled by stars equal in number with the States whose sons contributed their lives as the price of the victory won at Gettysburg.​
  • Cost: $50,000.00 for the Statue, in addition: to prepare the cemetery grounds, and complete reinternment of the dead around it, complete with headstones, fencing, and stone walls, and a lodge for the "porter": about $80,000.00, or a bit over $130,000.00 total. (without counting the cost of the Reynolds Statue, also purchased and installed at the same time.)
MONUMENT TEXT
Monument Front
GETTYSBURG
JULY 1, 2, 3,
1863

------

Monument REAR
IT IS RATHER FOR US TO BE
HERE DEDICATED TO THE GREAT
TASK REMAINING BEFORE US-
THAT FROM THESE HONORED DEAD
WE TAKE INCREASED DEVOTION TO
THAT CAUSE FOR WHICH THEY GAVE
THE LAST FULL MEASURE OF DEVOTION-
THAT WE HERE HIGHLY RESOLVE THAT
THESE DEAD SHALL NOT HAVE DIED
IN VAIN—THAT THIS NATION, UNDER
GOD, SHALL HAVE A NEW BIRTH OF
FREEDOM—AND THAT GOVERNMENT
OF THE PEOPLE, BY THE PEOPLE,
FOR THE PEOPLE, SHALL NOT PERISH
FROM THE EARTH. - LINCOLN,
- - - - - - - - - - - NOVEMBER 19, 1863


ADDITIONAL PHOTOS


1574311211528.png

Photo of Assembly of the
Soldiers' National Monument
With Block & Tackle Frame & Scaffolding
Tipton Photo, Circa June 1869,
Gettysburg National Military Park / NPS Photo.

-
-
-
-
-

1574281515906.png

View of the Soldiers' National Monument circa 1903
taken by the
Detroit Photographic Company,
LOC Photo

1574280304333.png

Genius of Liberty Statue,
©Michael Kendra, April 2002

1574280329602.png

Statue of War,
©Michael Kendra, April 2002

1574280348226.png

Statue of History,
©Michael Kendra, April 2002

1574280366527.png

Statue of Peace,
©Michael Kendra, April 2002

1574280387164.png

Statue of Plenty,
©Michael Kendra, April 2002

1574280060372.png

©Michael Kendra, April 2002

RELATED LINKS
citation information The following information is provided for citations.
Article Title:
Soldiers' National Monument (Gettysburg)
Article Subject:
Civil War Monuments, Structures, & Other Points of Interest
Author:
Mike Kendra, @CivilWarTalk
Website Name:
CivilWarTalk.com
URL:
https://civilwartalk.com/threads/soldiers-national-monument-gettysburg.165537/
Publisher:
CivilWarTalk, LLC
Original Published Date:
November 21, 2019

links to state and national monuments, and nearby landmarks Located at Gettysburg National Military Park, in Adams County, Pennsylvania (rev.6/1/21)
National Monuments
Eternal Light Peace Memorial Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial High Water Mark
Lincoln Speech Memorial Soldiers' National Monument
U.S. State Monuments
DE IN MD NY NY Auxiliary PA VT U.S. Regulars
C.S. State Monuments
AL AR DE FL GA LA MD MS NC SC TN TX VA
Union Regimentals
CT DE IL IN ME MD MA MI MN
NH NJ NY OH PA RI VT WV WI U.S. Regulars
Individual &
Commemorative
Monuments
Equestrian Monuments: Hancock Howard Lee Longstreet Meade Reynolds Sedgwick Slocum
Standing Bronze Statues:
Barlow Buford Burns Father Corby Crawford Doubleday Geary Gibbon
Greene Hays Humphreys Robinson Wadsworth Warren Webb
Wells
Other Individual Monuments:
Armistead Chapman Collis Cushing Fuller Rev. Howell Humiston Merwin
Nicholson Sickles Taylor Vincent Ward Weed & Hazlett Willard Woolson Zook
Landmarks
Black Horse Tavern Cashtown Inn Dobbin House Evergreen Cemetery Jennie Wade House Lutheran Theological Seminary
McAllister's Mill Railroad Station Sachs Covered Bridge
Thompson House David Wills House
Farms: Codori Bliss Brian
Daniel Schaefer Hummelbaugh Klingle Lady Leister McLean McPherson
Rogers Rose Rummel Sherfy Slyder Snyder Taney Trostle George Weikert Wentz
Points of Interest
New Museum & Visitor Center Benner's Hill Cemetery Hill Copse of Trees Culp's Hill
Devil's Den Peach Orchard Little Round Top
Big Round Top Sachs Covered Bridge
Spangler's Spring East Cavalry Field Soldiers' National Cemetery National Cemetery Annex

Gone But Not Forgotten: Old Museum, Visitor Center, & Electric Map Old Cyclorama National Tower
 
Last edited:

Gettysburg Guide #154

Sergeant
Member of the Month
Joined
Dec 30, 2019
MONUMENT PROFILE
  • Battlefield: Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania
  • Location: Soldiers' National Cemetery
  • Map Coordinates: +39° 49' 11.28", -77° 13' 52.32"

MONUMENT DETAILS
  • Artist: Rogers, Randolph, sculptor; Batterson, James Goodwin, designer; Keller, George W., designer.
  • Dedicated: July 1, 1869 (Cornerstone laid July 4, 1865)
  • Dimensions: Sculpture: H. 60 ft.; Base: W. 25 ft. x D. 25 ft.
  • Description:
The design of the monument, as executed by Mr. J. G. Batterson, of Hartford, Connecticut, is intended to be purely historical, telling its own story with such simplicity that any discerning mind will readily comprehend its meaning and purpose.​
The superstructure is sixty feet high, and consists of a massive pedestal, twenty-five feet square at the base, and is crowned with a colossal statue representing the Genius of Liberty. Standing upon a three-quarter globe, she raises with her right hand the victor's wreath of laurel, while with her left she gathers up the folds of our national flag under which the victory has been won. Projecting from the angles of the pedestal are four buttresses, supporting an equal number of allegorical statues representing, respectively, War, History, Peace, and Plenty.​
War is personified by a statue of the American soldier, who, resting from the conflict, relates to History the story of the battle which this monument is intended to commemorate.​
History, in listening attitude, records with stylus and tablet the achievements of the field and the names of the honored dead.​
Peace is symbolized by a statue of the American mechanic, characterized by appropriate accessories.​
Plenty is represented by a female figure, with a sheaf of wheat and fruits of the earth, typifying peace and abundance as the soldier's crowning triumph.​
The main die of the pedestal is octagonal in form, panelled upon each face. The cornice and plinth above are also octagonal, and are heavily moulded. Upon this plinth rests an octagonal moulded base bearing upon the face, in high relief, the national arms. The upper die and cap are circular in form, the die being encircled by stars equal in number with the States whose sons contributed their lives as the price of the victory won at Gettysburg.​

  • Cost: $50,000.00 for the Statue, in addition: to prepare the cemetery grounds, and complete reinternment of the dead around it, complete with headstones, fencing, and stone walls, and a lodge for the "porter": about $80,000.00, or a bit over $130,000.00 total. (without counting the cost of the Reynolds Statue, also purchased and installed at the same time.)

MONUMENT TEXT
Monument Front
GETTYSBURG
JULY 1, 2, 3,
1863

------

Monument REAR
IT IS RATHER FOR US TO BE
HERE DEDICATED TO THE GREAT
TASK REMAINING BEFORE US-
THAT FROM THESE HONORED DEAD
WE TAKE INCREASED DEVOTION TO
THAT CAUSE FOR WHICH THEY GAVE
THE LAST FULL MEASURE OF DEVOTION-
THAT WE HERE HIGHLY RESOLVE THAT
THESE DEAD SHALL NOT HAVE DIED
IN VAIN—THAT THIS NATION, UNDER
GOD, SHALL HAVE A NEW BIRTH OF
FREEDOM—AND THAT GOVERNMENT
OF THE PEOPLE, BY THE PEOPLE,
FOR THE PEOPLE, SHALL NOT PERISH
FROM THE EARTH. - LINCOLN,
- - - - - - - - - - - NOVEMBER 19, 1863


LOCATION MAP




ADDITIONAL PHOTOS


View attachment 335238
Photo of Assembly of the
Soldiers' National Monument
With Block & Tackle Frame & Scaffolding
Tipton Photo, Circa June 1869,
Gettysburg National Military Park / NPS Photo.

-
-
-
-
-

View attachment 335198
View of the Soldiers' National Monument circa 1903
taken by the
Detroit Photographic Company,
LOC Photo

View attachment 335190
Genius of Liberty Statue,
©Michael Kendra, April 2002

View attachment 335191
Statue of War,
©Michael Kendra, April 2002

View attachment 335192
Statue of History,
©Michael Kendra, April 2002

View attachment 335193
Statue of Peace,
©Michael Kendra, April 2002

View attachment 335194
Statue of Plenty,
©Michael Kendra, April 2002

View attachment 335189
©Michael Kendra, April 2002


RELATED LINKS
When the monument was dedicated on July 1, 1869, the statues of Peace and Plenty were not yet in place. Apparently, Rogers work on the statues was delayed because of a shortage of available marble in Italy, where he was doing his work. The final two pieces arrived and were installed in August.
 
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