Soldier Artifacts in the Galveston Rosenberg Library Museum Collection

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Lockhart, Texas
#1
Yesterday, I was honored to give a talk at the Galveston Rosenberg Library about my Civil War novel Tangled Honor, and its connections to historical Galveston. That part was fun.

But what gobsmacked me was seeing the table of Civil War artifacts that have been donated to the museum section of the library, My hostess, the archivist, literally went to her closet somewhere in the beautiful old 1904 building and pulled out these relics to add a little 'spice' to my talk.

The jacket, shirt and sock were donated in 1920 by ancestors of Joe Weekes, a 15-year old Confederate private from Alabama, who she said was captured at Fort Gaines.

I remember spending a very wet weekend inside Ft Gaines back in 2004 with a bunch of 9th Texas reenactors.

The hardtack, Spencer carbine and box of Colt Army Cartridges were dessert, each with its own donor who she named, but I've forgotten.
Anyway, I wish my closet held such treasures.
Alabama Weekes Jacket in Rosenberg Museum .jpg
Colt Piatol Cartridges Rosenberg Museumm.jpg
Hardtack from Wisconsin Soldier Rosenberg Museum.jpg
Sharps carbine at Rosenberg.jpg
Weeke's Sockat Rosenberg.jpg
 

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lelliott19

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#2
Joe Weekes, a 15-year old Confederate private from Alabama, who she said was captured at Fort Gaines
I found cards for a William Weekes, Pvt Co A 1 Battalion Alabama Cadets.
Enlisted July 1863 at Mobile, AL as a member of "Capt Price William, Jr.'s Company, Pelham Cadets, 1 Regiment Alabama Vols" which subsequently became Company A of the "1st Battalion Alabama Cadets."
Recorded on Company Muster Roll dated <illegible> 1863 as follows: Age <illegible> Height 5 feet 4 1/2 inches Complexion Dark Hair Black Eyes Black. Occupation: student Residence: Mobile
Captured August 5, 1864 at Fort Gaines
Exchanged <date illegible> 1865
Appears on a Roll of Prisoners of War of Co A 1 Battln Alabama Cadets, Genl. Holtzclaw's Brigade, Confederate States Army, commanded by Lieut. Dick Roper, surrendered at Citronelle, Ala. by Lieut. Gen R Taylor CSA to Maj. Gen ERS Canby, USA May 4 1865 and paroled at Meridian, Miss. May 13, 1865.
1555644498173.png
 

lelliott19

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#6
lelliot19, thank you for that quick research on Cadet William Weekes. Old man's memory confused William and Joe as his first name. I will forward the info to the library museum archivist today.
Do you want the entire file from Fold3? Im working on phone right now, but will attach the entire file when I get home.
 
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#9
Yesterday, I was honored to give a talk at the Galveston Rosenberg Library about my Civil War novel Tangled Honor, and its connections to historical Galveston. That part was fun.

But what gobsmacked me was seeing the table of Civil War artifacts that have been donated to the museum section of the library, My hostess, the archivist, literally went to her closet somewhere in the beautiful old 1904 building and pulled out these relics to add a little 'spice' to my talk.

The jacket, shirt and sock were donated in 1920 by ancestors of Joe Weekes, a 15-year old Confederate private from Alabama, who she said was captured at Fort Gaines.

I remember spending a very wet weekend inside Ft Gaines back in 2004 with a bunch of 9th Texas reenactors.

The hardtack, Spencer carbine and box of Colt Army Cartridges were dessert, each with its own donor who she named, but I've forgotten.
Anyway, I wish my closet held such treasures. View attachment 303363 View attachment 303364 View attachment 303365 View attachment 303366 View attachment 303367
Thank you for this, always great to know of another uniform, I particularly like the socks!
 

NH Civil War Gal

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#14
You probably don't know the answer but I do hope these items are being conserved somehow in acid-free boxes, etc. The moths have really gotten into the socks, besides the wearing out bit. That beautiful jacket can't be just folded and put away - every so often they have to be unfolded and folded a different way so they don't get lines in them. But nothing is going to wear out the hard tack!
 



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