So many questions about this Photo?????

Joined
Oct 6, 2011
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232
Location
Dickinson Texas
#1
1.) Is this a Civil War Photo? 2.) Where are the weapons? (I can make out one rifle and a couple of swords) 3.) All the "solders" look like teenagers. 4.) Every one has the same hair style (part down the middle) was this a regulation or just the style of that time?

Some things I do know about this photo: They were printed from 5x7 glass negatives, the photo was taken somewhere up north.

Civil War Photo 100r.jpg
 

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Oct 3, 2011
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Freedom, PA
#3
NCO chevrons are "points up", sack coats are five button, the caps on the officers all point to this being post Civil War, perhaps pre Spanish War or early 1900's. Just my .02
 
Joined
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Messages
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Dickinson Texas
#6
1.) Is this a Civil War Photo? 2.) Where are the weapons? (I can make out one rifle and a couple of swords) 3.) All the "solders" look like teenagers. 4.) Every one has the same hair style (part down the middle) was this a regulation or just the style of that time?

Some things I do know about this photo: They were printed from 5x7 glass negatives, the photo was taken somewhere up north.

View attachment 4264
My best guess is this photo was taken somewhere between 1870 when the factory-made dry plate was introduced and became popular and The Spanish–American War conflict in 1898.
 
Joined
Oct 6, 2011
Messages
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Dickinson Texas
#10
My guess is pre-WWI. When were calesthenics introduced?
I looked up Spanish American War Images, and they seemed to be a match. In a lot of the group photos no one had weapons, and the hands were held low and in front just like the one I posted.

When I was in the army we stood at attention with hands at the side or stood at ease with hands in the back. Vietnam Vet.
 

M E Wolf

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#12
O.R.--SERIES III--VOLUME V [S# 126]
CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, REPORTS, AND RETURNS OF THE UNION AUTHORITIES FROM MAY 1, 1865, TO THE END.(*)--#26
APPENDIX. (*)
PART XII.
DOCUMENT NO. 1.
Strength of the Army at various dates.
TABLE NO. 1.--Strength of U. S. Army January 1, 1861.(+)
TABLE No. 2.--Strength of the Army at various dates, compiled by the Adjutant-General of the Army, after a thorough revision of his records.(++)
DOCUMENT NO. 2.
Recruitment of European armies.(sq)
DOCUMENT NO. 3.
Recruitment of the British army.(sq)
DOCUMENT NO. 4.
Recruitment of the French army.(sq)
DOCUMENT NO. 5.
The organization of the rebel armies.
Although it was found impossible to obtain sufficiently comprehensive data from which to prepare a complete history of the creation and recruitment of the forces that confronted our own armies for four years, all the laws and general regulations issued by the rebel authorities relative to this subject, and some general information connected therewith, have been collated and are submitted.

[excerpt]
MEDICAL EXAMINATION OF MEN FOR MILITARY SERVICE AND FRAUDS TO BE GUARDED AGAINST.

The medical examinations of men for the military service were made in a large, well-lighted room, where they could be exercised briskly, and with the windows so arranged that the light fell equally upon every portion of it.

Upon entering the room the recruit, substitute, or drafted man was directed to divest himself of all his clothing. This was usually done in the presence of the surgeon, for this reason, that he was not then expecting to be noticed, and should he feel disposed to conceal any existing defects, as stiff joints, &c., he would in this way be thrown off his guard, and the attempted fraud at once detected without further examination.

He was first questioned in regard to his name, age, nativity, occupation, his general health and that of his family, whether any hereditary taints existed, and if he had ever suffered from any disease or accident, and if so, what; thus endeavoring to obtain all the information possible concerning him and at the same time enable the surgeon to judge of his mental as well as his physical qualifications.

He was then placed under a stationary measuring rod, directed to stand erect while his height was accurately noted, and a graduated tape was passed around the chest over the inferior angles of the scapula and directly over the nipple, and the measurement taken both at inspiration and expiration. After this the color of the eyes, hair, and the complexion were noted, and a general inspection of the whole body was now made, noticing the muscular development and general appearance, at the same time looking carefully for any tumors, ulcers, varicose veins or chronic swellings of the extremities, or any defect that could disqualify him for the service.

The head was then examined for any depressions or irregularities that might exist; the eyes, eyelids, ears, nose, teeth, palate, and fauces carefully noticed.

The chest was then inspected; respiration and the action of the heart observed, and anything that could be discovered by inspection, auscultation, or percussion noted.

He was next directed to stand erect, place his heels together, and raise his hands vertically above his head, the backs together, and was told to cough and make other expulsive movements, while the abdomen, inguinal rings, and scrotum were examined for hernia; the penis was then examined for epispadia, hypospadia, and venereal disease; the groin for glandular enlargements, and the testicles for atrophy, induration, or other diseases.

He was then directed to bend over, the fingers touching the floor, the legs straight and widely distended, and separating the nates, the fissure, for hemorrhoids, fistula, prolapsus, or any disease of the anus, was carefully inspected; and while in this position firm pressure was made on different portions of the spine to discover any disease or tenderness, if such existed.

Next he was directed to extend his arms straight from the body and then bring them together on the same level, behind and in front, pro-hate and supinate them rapidly, strike out from the shoulder, flex the arm upon the shoulder, and the forearm upon the arm, and open and close the fingers rapidly. In this way almost any defect of the upper extremities were discovered.

He was then told to walk rapidly, and then to run around the room several times, hop first on one foot and then on the other, with his heels together to raise himself upon his toes, then flex and extend the thigh, leg, and ankle, kick first with one foot and then the other, and make several leaps in the air. While thus excited he was again examined for chest diseases and also for hernia.

The eyesight was next tested by placing him at one end of the room while the surgeon stood at the other, and asking him the number or color of objects displayed to each eye separately. The hearing was also tested at the same time by modulating the tones of the voice while conversing with him, and covering one car while endeavoring to discover any defects that might exist in the other.

[end of excerpt]

All that drilling--there probably wasn't any need for gymnastics --staying alive probably provided enough exercise
:wink:Medical/Surgical History--Part III, Volume I
Chapter XI.--On Certain Diseases Not Heretofore Discussed.
I.--Nostalgia.[excerpt]Surgeon JOHN L. TAYLOR, 3d Mo. Cav.--In civil life every man was necessarily engaged in some business that gave more or less employment--enough for the sanitary condition of the mind and body. Many had been habituated to physical labor, with only such exercise of the mind as was necessary to accomplish the work on hand. For them to acquire a more extended field of mental labor is impossible; their habits of thought are formed. It is therefore needless to try a system of book-study with them. They must be taught practically the obligations and duties that become necessary for them to learn. They must be taught the manual of arms by the force of practice. They must learn the science of tactics by repeated drill. Daily military exercise should be enforced. This combines physical exercise with the same amount of mental labor that has been their custom through life. The home-sick pat lent shows a want of resolution and activity in all his undertakings; he is serious, sad and timid, apprehending on the slightest grounds the most serious results--great personal danger, and even death itself. This condition is soon followed by emaciation, languor and listlessness.

How shall we treat these patients? To send them home would encourage others to indulge in the hope of getting away. They begin to contemplate a leave of absence. Their minds are then permitted to entertain the causes that have produced the disease in others, and they become, as it were, imperceptibly entrapped. To ward off this condition the soldier must act before the vital and nervous powers become depressed.

During the first twelve months of the organization of this regiment we had twenty-three home-sick patients, and in five of these there was some mental alienation. especially manifested by their insistance that a return to their homes was indispensable to the recovery of their health. In many instances the symptoms of hypochondriasis were present: Disordered digestion; increased sensibility; palpitations; illusions; a succession of morbid feelings which appeared to simulate the greater part of disease; panics; exaggerated uneasiness of various kinds, chiefly in what regards the health, which they strenuously contended was seriously injured and could not be restored short of being at home. There was a stubborn indolence in these patients--an aversion to anything like even ordinary exercise. They were generally found lying in bed or sitting around the tents, making a great deal to do about their sufferings and the ills that were awaiting them. Kind and sympathizing words--amusements--seemed to invite a more deplorable condition. We became satisfied that an altogether different policy must be carried out. No ordinary means could arouse them from their mental and physical inactivity--they seemed to be callous to moral sensibility.

The patients were now required to exercise to the extent of their physical ability. This was enjoined as a duty. At the same time a system was inaugurated to impress them that their disease was a moral turpitude; that soldiers of courage, patriotism and sense should be superior to the influences that brought about their condition, and that to speak of home as inseparably connected with their recovery, and all that constituted happiness, was petty and degen-crating. The purpose in view was made known to the nurses, and every opportunity was taken to inflame the feelings of their patients by impressing them with the idea that their disease was looked upon with contempt--that gonorrhœa and syphilis were not more detestable. This course excited resentment,--passions were aroused, a new life was instilled and the patients rapidly recovered. Within two years not a single case of nostalgia has occurred, which may be attributed to the fact that idleness is unknown in the regiment, while the odium attached to the disease has played a part in causing the men to overcome the influences which tend to its production.

The fatigues of a march and the excitements of an active campaign stimulate the nervous energies to a high point. On the inauguration of a permanent camp, the labor necessary to secure shelter and comparative comfort fully occupies mind and body. But after a time, unless a healthy safety-valve be provided for the nervous force which has heretofore been expended in the superintendence of muscular action and in vital resistance to exposures, the soldier becomes fretted by the tameness of his camp-life. Tobacco is smoked during this period of listlessness and inactivity, nominally to pass the time,
but in reality for its sedative influence on the unemployed nervous system, until the circulation becomes poisoned and loss of appetite, impaired digestion and prostration of nerve-power are the results--the last being manifested by languor, tremulousness, palpitations and obscure cardiac pains. If alcoholic liquors can be obtained they are much resorted to at these times, and excesses tell on the nervous system by depressent action. Vicious dealings with the generative functions have, in individual cases, furnished the temporary excitement and produced that subsequent collapse of the vital powers which has figured on the registers as "nostalgia." Gambling is the favorite excitement of many, and prolonged sessions are held in cramped positions and foul atmospheres, implying loss of sleep and disorder of assimilation.

Excitement is craved--something to do to pass the dull hours. Drills and parades are better than nothing, as furnishing occupation and exercise; but they are distasteful to the men as devoid of excitement and savoring of unnecessary work.

Company commanders should cater to the tendencies of the leading spirits of the command. There are always certain men who can carry the crowd with them, either into foot- and base-ball clubs and other outdoor sports or to minstrel troupes and semi-theatrical entertainments, which furnish amusement to all, either as actors or audience. These men should be encouraged as the most valuable for the time being in the camp. Horse-racing affords an interest to all; and target-practice--not the formal so many rounds per man of duty-firing--but competitive shooting by teams from the different regiments. Pedestrianism ought to be cultivated among infantry troops, and prize-matches arranged for favorable days.

In large commands men can be picked out with special talents as vocalists, prestigiators, gymnasts, etc., and these should be organized as an army company and encouraged by official recognition and assistance in catering for the amusement of the troops. Everything of this kind would be hailed with enthusiasm.

A camp kept well amused will be a healthy one--free at least from all nostalgic influences--and the object to be gained, as promotive of efficiency, is worthy of special effort. In large commands an officer should be detailed as Superintendent of Public Amusements, who should be manager of theatrical performances, races, competitive shooting and prize competitions of all sorts. If active and enterprising, he would save many from the sick-list and the the command over the tedium of winter-quarters with undiminished nerve-force.













 
Joined
Oct 6, 2011
Messages
232
Location
Dickinson Texas
#14
[excerpt]
MEDICAL EXAMINATION OF MEN FOR MILITARY SERVICE AND FRAUDS TO BE GUARDED AGAINST.

The medical examinations of men for the military service were made in a large, well-lighted room, where they could be exercised briskly, and with the windows so arranged that the light fell equally upon every portion of it.

Upon entering the room the recruit, substitute, or drafted man was directed to divest himself of all his clothing. This was usually done in the presence of the surgeon, for this reason, that he was not then expecting to be noticed, and should he feel disposed to conceal any existing defects, as stiff joints, &c., he would in this way be thrown off his guard, and the attempted fraud at once detected without further examination.

He was first questioned in regard to his name, age, nativity, occupation, his general health and that of his family, whether any hereditary taints existed, and if he had ever suffered from any disease or accident, and if so, what; thus endeavoring to obtain all the information possible concerning him and at the same time enable the surgeon to judge of his mental as well as his physical qualifications.

He was then placed under a stationary measuring rod, directed to stand erect while his height was accurately noted, and a graduated tape was passed around the chest over the inferior angles of the scapula and directly over the nipple, and the measurement taken both at inspiration and expiration. After this the color of the eyes, hair, and the complexion were noted, and a general inspection of the whole body was now made, noticing the muscular development and general appearance, at the same time looking carefully for any tumors, ulcers, varicose veins or chronic swellings of the extremities, or any defect that could disqualify him for the service.

The head was then examined for any depressions or irregularities that might exist; the eyes, eyelids, ears, nose, teeth, palate, and fauces carefully noticed.

The chest was then inspected; respiration and the action of the heart observed, and anything that could be discovered by inspection, auscultation, or percussion noted.

He was next directed to stand erect, place his heels together, and raise his hands vertically above his head, the backs together, and was told to cough and make other expulsive movements, while the abdomen, inguinal rings, and scrotum were examined for hernia; the penis was then examined for epispadia, hypospadia, and venereal disease; the groin for glandular enlargements, and the testicles for atrophy, induration, or other diseases.

He was then directed to bend over, the fingers touching the floor, the legs straight and widely distended, and separating the nates, the fissure, for hemorrhoids, fistula, prolapsus, or any disease of the anus, was carefully inspected; and while in this position firm pressure was made on different portions of the spine to discover any disease or tenderness, if such existed.

Next he was directed to extend his arms straight from the body and then bring them together on the same level, behind and in front, pro-hate and supinate them rapidly, strike out from the shoulder, flex the arm upon the shoulder, and the forearm upon the arm, and open and close the fingers rapidly. In this way almost any defect of the upper extremities were discovered.

He was then told to walk rapidly, and then to run around the room several times, hop first on one foot and then on the other, with his heels together to raise himself upon his toes, then flex and extend the thigh, leg, and ankle, kick first with one foot and then the other, and make several leaps in the air. While thus excited he was again examined for chest diseases and also for hernia.

The eyesight was next tested by placing him at one end of the room while the surgeon stood at the other, and asking him the number or color of objects displayed to each eye separately. The hearing was also tested at the same time by modulating the tones of the voice while conversing with him, and covering one car while endeavoring to discover any defects that might exist in the other.

The medical exam I under went in 1969 for induction into the army wasn't this extensive. Basically if you had ten toes and ten fingers you were drafted (my opinion).
 



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