Slaves and the downfall of the Confederacy

Andersonh1

Brigadier General
Moderator
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Location
South Carolina
So were they converting volunteer companies into militia at that point? Or were the companies of officers who resigned transferred to the militia?

"Immediately after the Volunteer organization shall have been perfected, the organization of the regular Militia will be proceeded with... all persons... subject to militia duty, who have not joined volunteer companies, will be enrolled and organized..."
 

19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
So were they converting volunteer companies into militia at that point? Or were the companies of officers who resigned transferred to the militia?

"Immediately after the Volunteer organization shall have been perfected, the organization of the regular Militia will be proceeded with... all persons... subject to militia duty, who have not joined volunteer companies, will be enrolled and organized..."
So were they converting volunteer companies into militia at that point?

No.

Or were the companies of officers who resigned transferred to the militia?

Just the officers. Someone else would fill their place.
 

Andersonh1

Brigadier General
Moderator
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Location
South Carolina
1862 Louisiana Militia law: https://archive.org/details/officialcopyofmi01loui/page/n3/mode/2up?view=theater

The purpose of the act was "to reorganize the militia", and as I noted before, the definition of who was required to be a member, i.e. "all the free white males capable of bearing arms residing in the State, and are eighteen years of age and not over forty-five, and who are not exempt under this law" is essentially the same as the 1853 law in terms of race and age requirements. The 1853 militia law was in force when the Native Guards were accepted into service and did not preclude their service, so there's no reason to think the 1862 law changed anything in that regard.

Passages from the 1862 law dealing with Volunteer companies:

Sec. 42. Be it further enacted, &c., That Volunteer Companies, Battalions. Regiments and Brigades may be organized in this State under the same rules as Companies, Battalions, Regiments and Brigades of the regular Militia, with the following exceptions and regulations: Each company shall consist of not less than sixty privates lor Artillery and Infantry, and thirty-two for Cavalry ; provided, that no Company shall have more than one hundred privates ; ten Companies shall form one Regiment, and not less than four nor more than six Regiments shall form a Brigade, and any Company of Artillery or Cavalry may be attached to a Volunteer Brigade with the consent of the Commander-in-Chief. The volunteer companies, Regiments and Brigades may determine the mode of electing or appointing their own officers, which officers shall be the same as are provided by this act for the militia, and be subject to the orders of the Commander-in-Chief and the Major General of the State ; Provided, that any Volunteer Company, Regiment or Battalion organized according to this act, which shall not have attached itself to any Brigade within thirty days after the passage of this act, may be attached, by the Commander-in-Chief, to any Brigade cither volunteer or militia.​
Sec. 43. Be it further enacted, &c, That the different companies and Regiments may select their own uniform and adopt such by-laws and regulations for their government, which shall have the force of laws when approved by the Commander-in-Chief; provided, the same be not inconsistent with this act. Their courts-martial and courts of assessment and inquiry shall be formed as under the provisions of this act.​
There was a limited time in which to form volunteer companies after the passage of the reorganization law.
Sec. 44. Be it further enacted, &c, That after thirty days after the passage of this act no additional volunteer companies shall be formed without the consent of the Commander-in-Chief, and that no person shall be received after said time in any volunteer company without the consent of the Major General.​
I thought this provision was interesting:
Sec. 46. Be it further enacted, etc., That volunteer officers shall take precedence over militia officers of the same rank.​

Volunteers and militia could share arsenals.

Sec. 48. Be it further enacted, &c., That the Commander-in-Chief is hereby authorized to establish arsenals in such places as he may deem proper and appoint Armorers for the same, and adopt regulations for the use of the arms of the State in drilling the volunteer and militia companies.​
 

19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
The regular militia (white males, 18-45) in New Orleans were basically ineffective and not trusted by Confederate authorities. Only 20-30% would show up for drills or review. When Farragut made his way to the city, they were assigned to burn cotton.

They armed the Native Guards, but not the white militia.
 

Cycom

Sergeant
Joined
Feb 19, 2021
Location
Los Angeles, California
The regular militia (white males, 18-45) in New Orleans were basically ineffective and not trusted by Confederate authorities. Only 20-30% would show up for drills or review. When Farragut made his way to the city, they were assigned to burn cotton.

They armed the Native Guards, but not the white militia.
I remember reading about how the militia there were highly unreliable. Any ideas why?
 
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