Slaves and the downfall of the Confederacy

Piedone

Corporal
Joined
Oct 8, 2020
In some other threads there arose the question how relevant the increasing loss of slave labour (through unrest, liberation, growing unwillingness, escapes) was for the downfall of the Confederacy.

I was of the opinion that it wasn't that relevant as most of the slaves seemingly did wait as long as possible before they dared to flee or to openly disobey - as far as I read they just dared it when the arrival of Union troops was imminent.
Hence I'd conclude that there shouldn't have been any relevant (slave) labour shortage in the territories under confederate control.

@leftyhunter has a different view - highlighting a generally growing unwillingness of slaves to cooperate with their owners. This should have led to a declining production everywhere in the South especially in places where it was not possible to exert enough pressure on the enslaved workforce (eg. because too many males were absent in the army...).

What do you think? Where's the truth? On which sources could we base our guesses?
 

leftyhunter

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Joined
May 27, 2011
Location
los angeles ca
In some other threads there arose the question how relevant the increasing loss of slave labour (through unrest, liberation, growing unwillingness, escapes) was for the downfall of the Confederacy.

I was of the opinion that it wasn't that relevant as most of the slaves seemingly did wait as long as possible before they dared to flee or to openly disobey - as far as I read they just dared it when the arrival of Union troops was imminent.
Hence I'd conclude that there shouldn't have been any relevant (slave) labour shortage in the territories under confederate control.

@leftyhunter has a different view - highlighting a generally growing unwillingness of slaves to cooperate with their owners. This should have led to a declining production everywhere in the South especially in places where it was not possible to exert enough pressure on the enslaved workforce (eg. because too many males were absent in the army...).

What do you think? Where's the truth? On which sources could we base our guesses?
I will try to go through my books when I am home and see what I come up with.
Leftyhunter
 

Viper21

Brigadier General
Moderator
Silver Patron
Joined
Jul 4, 2016
Location
Rockbridge County, Virginia
In some other threads there arose the question how relevant the increasing loss of slave labour (through unrest, liberation, growing unwillingness, escapes) was for the downfall of the Confederacy.

I was of the opinion that it wasn't that relevant as most of the slaves seemingly did wait as long as possible before they dared to flee or to openly disobey - as far as I read they just dared it when the arrival of Union troops was imminent.
Hence I'd conclude that there shouldn't have been any relevant (slave) labour shortage in the territories under confederate control.

@leftyhunter has a different view - highlighting a generally growing unwillingness of slaves to cooperate with their owners. This should have led to a declining production everywhere in the South especially in places where it was not possible to exert enough pressure on the enslaved workforce (eg. because too many males were absent in the army...).

What do you think? Where's the truth? On which sources could we base our guesses?
It was pretty relevant in areas of Yankee occupation. Louisiana comes to mind. Many slaves were taken & put in contraband camps. In some cases forced to work for the Yankees.

There were cases of Yankee "recruiters" forcing black folks into the USCT's at the point of a bayonet. This practice even received attention from Lincoln himself.

I've often heard from some of my fellow posters, that southern black folks were flocking to the Yankees in huge numbers, & couldn't wait to join the USCT's, & fight against the Confederates. Thing is we know, some of them were forced into that blue uniform. We also know, there were 4,000,000 slaves in 1860 (roughly 3.5 mil in CSA states & 500K in others). Yet, the USCT only numbered roughly 180,000 total. That's not even 5% of the slave population. It also doesn't take into account Freemen who may have volunteered. I believe there were approx 500,000 total. About 1/2 living in Yankee land, & 1/2 living in the South.

For reference, I believe Confederate enlistments were somewhere around 1,000,000 total, that's anywhere from 15-20% of the Confederate states' total population. Significant in my opinion.

Add in the fact that, many black folks stayed where they were. Some even lived out their days, on the same farms, they'd lived their whole lives. My point..? Something in these narratives doesn't add up, at least in my opinion.
 

BuckeyeWarrior

Sergeant
Joined
Jan 1, 2020
Location
Ohio
It was pretty relevant in areas of Yankee occupation. Louisiana comes to mind. Many slaves were taken & put in contraband camps. In some cases forced to work for the Yankees.

There were cases of Yankee "recruiters" forcing black folks into the USCT's at the point of a bayonet. This practice even received attention from Lincoln himself.

I've often heard from some of my fellow posters, that southern black folks were flocking to the Yankees in huge numbers, & couldn't wait to join the USCT's, & fight against the Confederates. Thing is we know, some of them were forced into that blue uniform. We also know, there were 4,000,000 slaves in 1860 (roughly 3.5 mil in CSA states & 500K in others). Yet, the USCT only numbered roughly 180,000 total. That's not even 5% of the slave population. It also doesn't take into account Freemen who may have volunteered. I believe there were approx 500,000 total. About 1/2 living in Yankee land, & 1/2 living in the South.

For reference, I believe Confederate enlistments were somewhere around 1,000,000 total, that's anywhere from 15-20% of the Confederate states' total population. Significant in my opinion.

Add in the fact that, many black folks stayed where they were. Some even lived out their days, on the same farms, they'd lived their whole lives. My point..? Something in these narratives doesn't add up, at least in my opinion.
I don't think anyone was keeping accurate track of how many slaves fled to Union lines. I've seen estimates of up to 1 million. Considering that slaves risked severe punishment and even death for fleeing during the war it took alot of courage to do so.

One thing I've always been amused about is how many southern slave owners actually believed their propaganda of the "happy slave". I've read many diaries and letters from women left on the plantations who were shocked and felt betrayed when their slaves ran away to the union army.

These slaves were uneducated and didn't have any money. Is it really surprising that many stayed in the south and even on their plantations? But many did and I think this letter from freedman to his former master gives us insight into what former slaves thought of their masters and working on an enslaved labor farm.



Dayton, Ohio, August 7, 1865
To My Old Master, Colonel P.H. Anderson
Big Spring, Tennessee

Sir: I got your letter, and was glad to find that you had not forgotten Jordan, and that you wanted me to come back and live with you again, promising to do better for me than anybody else can. I have often felt uneasy about you.

I thought the Yankees would have hung you long before this, for harboring Rebs they found at your house. I suppose they never heard about your going to Colonel Martin’s to kill the Union soldier that was left by his company in their stable.

Although you shot at me twice before I left you, I did not want to hear of your being hurt, and am glad you are still living. It would do me good to go back to the dear old home again, and see Miss Mary and Miss Martha and Allen, Esther, Green, and Lee.

Give my love to them all, and tell them I hope we will meet in the better world, if not in this. I would have gone back to see you all when I was working in the Nashville Hospital, but one of the neighbors told me that Henry intended to shoot me if he ever got a chance.

I want to know particularly what the good chance is you propose to give me. I am doing tolerably well here. I get twenty-five dollars a month, with victuals and clothing; have a comfortable home for Mandy,—the folks call her Mrs. Anderson,—and the children—Milly, Jane, and Grundy—go to school and are learning well.

The teacher says Grundy has a head for a preacher. They go to Sunday school, and Mandy and me attend church regularly. We are kindly treated.

Sometimes we overhear others saying, “Them colored people were slaves” down in Tennessee. The children feel hurt when they hear such remarks; but I tell them it was no disgrace in Tennessee to belong to Colonel Anderson.

Many darkeys would have been proud, as I used to be, to call you master. Now if you will write and say what wages you will give me, I will be better able to decide whether it would be to my advantage to move back again.

As to my freedom, which you say I can have, there is nothing to be gained on that score, as I got my free papers in 1864 from the Provost-Marshal-General of the
Department of Nashville.

Mandy says she would be afraid to go back without some proof that you were disposed to treat us justly and kindly; and we have concluded to test your sincerity by asking you to send us our wages for the time we served you.

This will make us forget and forgive old scores, and rely on your justice and friendship in the future.

I served you faithfully for thirty-two years, and Mandy twenty years. At twenty-five dollars a month for me, and two dollars a week for Mandy, our earnings would amount to eleven thousand six hundred and eighty dollars.

Add to this the interest for the time our wages have been kept back, and deduct what you paid for our clothing, and three doctor’s visits to me, and pulling a tooth for Mandy, and the balance will show what we are in justice entitled to.

Please send the money by Adams’s Express, in care of V. Winters, Esq., Dayton, Ohio.

If you fail to pay us for faithful labors in the past, we can have little faith in your promises in the future. We trust the good Maker has opened your eyes to the wrongs which you and your fathers have done to me and my fathers, in making us toil for you for generations without recompense.

Here I draw my wages every Saturday night; but in Tennessee there was never any pay-day for the negroes any more than for the horses and cows.

Surely there will be a day of reckoning for those who defraud the laborer of his hire.

In answering this letter, please state if there would be any safety for my Milly and Jane, who are now grown up, and both good-looking girls. You know how it was with poor Matilda and Catherine.(I think he's implying his former master raped Matilda and Catherine?)

I would rather stay here and starve—and die, if it come to that—than have my girls brought to shame by the violence and wickedness of their young masters.

You will also please state if there has been any schools opened for the colored children in your neighborhood. The great desire of my life now is to give my children an education, and have them form virtuous habits.

Say howdy to George Carter, and thank him for taking the pistol from you when you were shooting at me.

From your old servant, Jourdon Anderson
 

Viper21

Brigadier General
Moderator
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Location
Rockbridge County, Virginia
These slaves were uneducated and didn't have any money. Is it really surprising that many stayed in the south and even on their plantations? But many did and I think this letter from freedman to his former master gives us insight into what former slaves thought of their masters and working on an enslaved labor farm.



Dayton, Ohio, August 7, 1865
To My Old Master, Colonel P.H. Anderson
Big Spring, Tennessee

Sir: I got your letter, and was glad to find that you had not forgotten Jordan, and that you wanted me to come back and live with you again, promising to do better for me than anybody else can. I have often felt uneasy about you.

I thought the Yankees would have hung you long before this, for harboring Rebs they found at your house. I suppose they never heard about your going to Colonel Martin’s to kill the Union soldier that was left by his company in their stable.

Although you shot at me twice before I left you, I did not want to hear of your being hurt, and am glad you are still living. It would do me good to go back to the dear old home again, and see Miss Mary and Miss Martha and Allen, Esther, Green, and Lee.

Give my love to them all, and tell them I hope we will meet in the better world, if not in this. I would have gone back to see you all when I was working in the Nashville Hospital, but one of the neighbors told me that Henry intended to shoot me if he ever got a chance.

I want to know particularly what the good chance is you propose to give me. I am doing tolerably well here. I get twenty-five dollars a month, with victuals and clothing; have a comfortable home for Mandy,—the folks call her Mrs. Anderson,—and the children—Milly, Jane, and Grundy—go to school and are learning well.

The teacher says Grundy has a head for a preacher. They go to Sunday school, and Mandy and me attend church regularly. We are kindly treated.

Sometimes we overhear others saying, “Them colored people were slaves” down in Tennessee. The children feel hurt when they hear such remarks; but I tell them it was no disgrace in Tennessee to belong to Colonel Anderson.

Many darkeys would have been proud, as I used to be, to call you master. Now if you will write and say what wages you will give me, I will be better able to decide whether it would be to my advantage to move back again.

As to my freedom, which you say I can have, there is nothing to be gained on that score, as I got my free papers in 1864 from the Provost-Marshal-General of the
Department of Nashville.

Mandy says she would be afraid to go back without some proof that you were disposed to treat us justly and kindly; and we have concluded to test your sincerity by asking you to send us our wages for the time we served you.

This will make us forget and forgive old scores, and rely on your justice and friendship in the future.

I served you faithfully for thirty-two years, and Mandy twenty years. At twenty-five dollars a month for me, and two dollars a week for Mandy, our earnings would amount to eleven thousand six hundred and eighty dollars.

Add to this the interest for the time our wages have been kept back, and deduct what you paid for our clothing, and three doctor’s visits to me, and pulling a tooth for Mandy, and the balance will show what we are in justice entitled to.

Please send the money by Adams’s Express, in care of V. Winters, Esq., Dayton, Ohio.

If you fail to pay us for faithful labors in the past, we can have little faith in your promises in the future. We trust the good Maker has opened your eyes to the wrongs which you and your fathers have done to me and my fathers, in making us toil for you for generations without recompense.

Here I draw my wages every Saturday night; but in Tennessee there was never any pay-day for the negroes any more than for the horses and cows.

Surely there will be a day of reckoning for those who defraud the laborer of his hire.

In answering this letter, please state if there would be any safety for my Milly and Jane, who are now grown up, and both good-looking girls. You know how it was with poor Matilda and Catherine.(I think he's implying his former master raped Matilda and Catherine?)

I would rather stay here and starve—and die, if it come to that—than have my girls brought to shame by the violence and wickedness of their young masters.

You will also please state if there has been any schools opened for the colored children in your neighborhood. The great desire of my life now is to give my children an education, and have them form virtuous habits.

Say howdy to George Carter, and thank him for taking the pistol from you when you were shooting at me.

From your old servant, Jourdon Anderson
Uneducated, & no money, would've been a great reason to join the USCT's. I'm shocked that more didn't. The USCT numbers are usually touted as a lot, or a high number. I consider it a small number under the common narratives.

The letter, sure doesn't read like an uneducated man wrote it. I'd love to see an actual copy of the letter, & or, a copy of the supposed letter written by Col Anderson. I know this Jordan Anderson letter first appeared in the book, The Freedmen's Book 1866 Written by abolitionist Lydia Maria Child.

I've read this letter in her book. It's on page 265. It's not sourced, & there are no footnotes to follow.

From her bio on Amazon: Lydia Maria Child was an American abolitionist and Women’s rights activist. Her journals, fiction and domestic manuals reached wide audiences from the 1820s through the 1850s. She at times shocked her audience, as she tried to take on issues of both male dominance and white supremacy in some of her stories. After reading the writing of William Lloyd Garrison, she and her husband became ardent abolitionists. After the end of the Civil War, she compiled these stories and biographies into a single volume as a book of role models for the newly emancipated slaves.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/1499792697/?tag=civilwartalkc-20

Maybe it's an authentic letter, maybe it was propaganda that made for a good story. I'm sure people enjoyed it then, as surely some people enjoy it today. According to wikipedia, the letter was published in a Cincinnati Newspaper. However, searching Chronicling America, I couldn't find it.

Here's an 1870 Census document showing Jordan Anderson was a real person.

enhance.jpg


The census document (5 yrs after) has marked, "cannot read" & "cannot write". So, this certainly backs up my belief that he didn't write this letter. The text certainly doesn't read like an uneducated man even dictated it. I've read plenty of letters dictated by illiterate former slaves. This one doesn't read like it was put together by such a man. I read it as a snarky propaganda piece written by an educated person. Here's a copy of it's reprint in a NY Paper:

Letter_to_my_Old_Master%2C_from_Jordan_Anderson.jpg


This "letter" was most likely written by Valentine Winters, abolitionist, attorney, g grandfather of Jonathon Winters, founder of Winters Bank, & employer of Jordan Anderson in Dayton, Ohio.


Just like any other claim, this letter is subject to criticism, & should be treated with the same skepticism, that so many other claims are. We read a lot of skepticism concerning @Andersonh1's newspaper thread. Somehow, I doubt the folks who read his newspaper articles with incredibly high standards of authenticity, would view this newspaper article with the same skepticism. Funny how that works.
 

FedericoFCavada

First Sergeant
Joined
Jan 27, 2015
Location
San Antonio, Texas
@Viper21: You are overly fixated on the United States CT numbers and military service. North and South African American labor, unremunerated and poorly paid both, built the fortifications, labored in the camps, did the laundry, dug the ditches and graves, and did all manner of grueling, dirty jobs for the armies.

The removal of labor power in many instances constituted a sort of "strike" that undermined the Confederate effort. Slaves were understandably reticent to risk their lives or those of loved ones in a full scale revolt or even an arduous trek to Union lines. Yet, in the latter case, a good many did become "contrabands" and performed all manner of menial tasks. Exposure to uneducated and impoverished blacks from the rural south convinced many northerners and mid-westerners of the iniquities of the slave system and the essential question of "half slave and half free." Those less convinced were nonetheless more than happy to have some of the more unpleasant tasks of army life taken up by the people of color within contraband camps, or working around Union compounds and barracks...
 

19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
Loyalties.

This is certainly not the PC view - not PC then, not PC now - but they are observations of those who actually lived through the conflict:


"...the black rebs were worse than the white."

"Well, we fought--aye, for four years we fought,
Pouring out lavish treasure and life--
Did the black then arise as he ought,
Cleaving northward with torch and with knife?
All his masters were far from his track,
Under Johnston and Lee in the fight;
There was nothing to hold the black back
From assisting his champion, the white.

Did he aid us when bleeding we stood
To chase from him slavery's dreams,
Or to Lee sent he clothing, and food,
Harness, powder, equipment and teams.
We all know that in one single State
A revolt would have ended the fight;
So no more of their 'loyalty' prate,
For the black rebs were worse than the white."

-by "Miles O'Reilly" (pseudonym of Colonel & AAG Charles Halpine, USA)
https://civilwartalk.com/threads/bl...st-war-newspapers.165002/page-13#post-2319489
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_G._Halpine

*

"...the bitterest rebel of all..."

New Orleans Times, February 28, 1867:
NOtimes28feb1867a.jpg

NOtimes28feb1867b.jpg

NOtimes28feb1867c.jpg
 

19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
Searching through the PC Cobwebs

Jordan Noble, a free black who played the drum for Andrew Jackson in 1815, raised a company to support the Confederates in 1861. He would later claim original loyalty to the US. He wrote a short biographical sketch of his military service in which he made no mention of that Confederate service. I suppose some of the PC stance had to do with survival - if you want a pension, you better not mention the Confederacy....

NoblePension.jpg


Noble, Jordan B.jpg

Noble, Jordan B (1).jpg
 
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FedericoFCavada

First Sergeant
Joined
Jan 27, 2015
Location
San Antonio, Texas
Some Louisiana free people of color, mixed-race "mulatos" and "creoles" in Louisiana had a military tradition of militia service. They offered their services in defense of the southern parishes of Louisiana to the Confederacy. They were rebuffed. They later reformed after the Union occupation and styled themselves in Francophone fashion a veritable "Corps d'Afrique."

https://www.blackpast.org/african-a...a-native-guard-usa-corps-d-afrique-1862-1863/
 

19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
Some Louisiana free people of color, mixed-race "mulatos" and "creoles" in Louisiana had a military tradition of militia service. They offered their services in defense of the southern parishes of Louisiana to the Confederacy. They were rebuffed. They later reformed after the Union occupation and styled themselves in Francophone fashion a veritable "Corps d'Afrique."

https://www.blackpast.org/african-a...a-native-guard-usa-corps-d-afrique-1862-1863/
But is that true?

"no real plan for their use was decided upon until April 24, when news of Farragut's fleet steaming upriver spurred a subordinate of [Confederate] General Lovell to hastily distribute old muskets to the Native Guards and post them along the Esplanade side of the French Quarter." -New Orleans after the Civil War by Justin A. Nystrom, p.25

"They later reformed after the Union occupation and styled themselves in Francophone fashion a veritable "Corps d'Afrique."

According to historian James Hollandsworth, 108 out of 1035 did.
 

FedericoFCavada

First Sergeant
Joined
Jan 27, 2015
Location
San Antonio, Texas
Ten percent then, forming the nucleus of the 1st LA Native Guard USA. Thanks for the late James G. Hollandsworth, Jr. reference.
Two months before the surrender of NOLA to the U.S. army and navy, I have it that the CSA militia was disbanded, under the law of late January?

Certainly the Confederate Louisiana legislature barred non-whites from militia service.

Here's the law passed 23 Jan. 1862:

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=dul1.ark:/13960/t5s76689d&view=1up&seq=3

Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the State of Louisiana, in General Assembly convened, That the Militia of the State of Louisiana shall be composed of all the free white males capable of bearing arms residing in the State, and are eighteen years of age and not over forty-five and who are not exempt under this law.
 

Andersonh1

Brigadier General
Moderator
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Jan 12, 2016
Location
South Carolina
Ten percent then, forming the nucleus of the 1st LA Native Guard USA. Thanks for the late James G. Hollandsworth, Jr. reference.
Two months before the surrender of NOLA to the U.S. army and navy, I have it that the CSA militia was disbanded, under the law of late January?

Certainly the Confederate Louisiana legislature barred non-whites from militia service.

Here's the law passed 23 Jan. 1862:

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=dul1.ark:/13960/t5s76689d&view=1up&seq=3

Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the State of Louisiana, in General Assembly convened, That the Militia of the State of Louisiana shall be composed of all the free white males capable of bearing arms residing in the State, and are eighteen years of age and not over forty-five and who are not exempt under this law.

The 1st Louisiana Native Guard were not militia, they were Volunteer Louisiana State Troops, formed under the authority of the State Military Board's power to accept volunteer companies. The Board had been established by the Louisiana legislature to deal with preparing the state for a possible war, and among the members of the board was the Governor of Louisiana at the time, Thomas Moore.

Part of the board's regulations:
Sec. 5 Be it further enacted That volunteer companies desiring to be furnished with arms, shall report their organization to said Board, under the rules to be established by the Board; and volunteer companies, battalions, regiments and brigades, may be formed and elect tteir own officers, independent of the present Militia law, and subject to no command but their own officers and the Governor, Provided that no company shall consist of less than thirty members.​

The 1853 Louisiana militia law, in effect when the Native Guard formed, also specified free white males, but it did not prevent the Native Guard from forming, precisely because they were independent of the state's Militia law.

The 1853 law:
Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the State of Louisiana, in General Assembly convened, That the Militia of the State of Louisiana shall be composed of all free white males residing in the State, and who have resided there sixty days, and are eighteen years of age, and not yet forty-five, and who are not exempt under the laws of the United States or of this State.​
Orders for the Native Guard:

The Times Picayune Fr Sep 20 1861
hjfvuzk-jpg.jpg
 
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FedericoFCavada

First Sergeant
Joined
Jan 27, 2015
Location
San Antonio, Texas
So the law in 1853 was as meaningless as the law in 1862 then? The 20 Sept. 1861 rather predates the 23 Jan. 1862, but you mean to assert that the prohibition on non-whites bearing arms was as meaningless then as it was in 1853?

Why no weapons or uniforms?

You quote Wade Hampton in your signature, a white-line Democrat governor of South Carolina after the Civil War who was incensed by the exercise of 2nd Amendment rights to keep and bear arms by blacks... And who capitalized on the 1876 massacre of black militia by "Pitchfork Ben" Tillman and the Red Shirts... But now you insist, what exactly? That persons of African ancestry were warmly welcomed when they served in military units in the U.S. South? Or it was only the military service of African Americans in the Union that was the issue in the American South, since obviously black Confederates might have prevailed? Or what?
 

Andersonh1

Brigadier General
Moderator
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Location
South Carolina
So the law in 1853 was as meaningless as the law in 1862 then? The 20 Sept. 1861 rather predates the 23 Jan. 1862, but you mean to assert that the prohibition on non-whites bearing arms was as meaningless then as it was in 1853?

Not at all. The militia law governed the militia. The Native Guard were not militia, therefore the militia law didn't apply to them.

Volunteer State troops and militia were two different things.

You quote Wade Hampton in your signature, a white-line Democrat governor of South Carolina after the Civil War who was incensed by the exercise of 2nd Amendment rights to keep and bear arms by blacks... And who capitalized on the 1876 massacre of black militia by "Pitchfork Ben" Tillman and the Red Shirts... But now you insist, what exactly? That persons of African ancestry were warmly welcomed when they served in military units in the U.S. South? Or it was only the military service of African Americans in the Union that was the issue in the American South, since obviously black Confederates might have prevailed? Or what?

Not at all what I said. Where exactly did all of this come from? I clarified the legal authority under which the Native Guard operated, nothing more.
 

FedericoFCavada

First Sergeant
Joined
Jan 27, 2015
Location
San Antonio, Texas
Not at all. The militia law governed the militia. The Native Guard were not militia, therefore the militia law didn't apply to them.

Volunteer State troops and militia were two different things.



Not at all what I said. Where exactly did all of this come from? I clarified the legal authority under which the Native Guard operated, nothing more.
Hopefully you can correct the record over at Wikipedia, which is apparently in error?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1st_Louisiana_Native_Guard_(Confederate)

Your quote "You have no right to ask, or expect that she will at once profess unbounded love to that Union from which for four years she tried to escape at the cost of her best blood and all her treasure." is from Wade Hampton, is it not? THE Wade Hampton? Or some other Wade Hampton? I'm assuming it is the Charlestonian Wade Hampton III (1818-1902), one of the largest slaveholders in the U.S. South, Lt. General of CSA cavalry, and South Carolina redeemer postwar, governor of South Carolina from 1876-1879, and Senator from that state until 1891? That is "where ... all of [that about the 1876 Hamburg, SC massacre] came from?"

Why did the 1st Louisiana Native Guard (CSA), dispand between 15 Feb. 1862 and 24 Mar. 1862? Is it not the case that they were disbanded again 25 April 1862? Was it merely that NOLA had been occupied?
 

Andersonh1

Brigadier General
Moderator
Joined
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Location
South Carolina
Hopefully you can correct the record over at Wikipedia, which is apparently in error?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1st_Louisiana_Native_Guard_(Confederate)

They're not the only ones. I've seen a lot of websites refer to the Native Guard as militia. But that is incorrect.

That being said, they did ultimately fall under the authority of Major General John Lewis, commanding State Militia, according to Governor Moore's orders of March 24, 1862, so maybe that's where the confusion lies. Moore never calls them militia though, he refers to them as a "military organization"

Your quote "You have no right to ask, or expect that she will at once profess unbounded love to that Union from which for four years she tried to escape at the cost of her best blood and all her treasure." is from Wade Hampton, is it not? THE Wade Hampton? Or some other Wade Hampton? I'm assuming it is the Charlestonian Wade Hampton III (1818-1902), one of the largest slaveholders in the U.S. South, Lt. General of CSA cavalry, and South Carolina redeemer postwar, governor of South Carolina from 1876-1879, and Senator from that state until 1891? That is "where ... all of [that about the 1876 Hamburg, SC massacre] came from?"

What does that have to do with the topic of the thread?

Why did the 1st Louisiana Native Guard (CSA), dispand between 15 Feb. 1862 and 24 Mar. 1862? Is it not the case that they were disbanded again 25 April 1862? Was it merely that NOLA had been occupied?

They disbanded when New Orleans was occupied, yes. I'm not sure they disbanded between February and March, despite, again, many history sites saying that they did. Credit goes to 19th Georgia for finding the following, which would indicate that at least a portion of them, the Meschacebe Native Guards under Captain Amrand Lanusse, were still training during that time period.

qrlYFVg.jpg
 
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19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
By law (technically) the NG were 'volunteer state troops', but both militia and volunteers were generally known as militia.

Sometimes General Lewis would issue an order with a militia heading and other times volunteer troops or Louisiana troops.

I'll find some examples and post later.
 

19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
Or maybe it was the governor that referred to all as militia. It's been awhile since I've looked through these records:

"Official--By the Governor...HEADQUARTERS LOUISIANA MILITIA....Major-General John L. Lewis, Commanding the State Militia, will cause daily reports...of the Volunteer Troops...of every member resigning from their respective commands...in order that the names may be recorded, and the parties reported for Militia duty."

Resigning from the volunteers would make them subject to militia duty if they were white and within the ages of 18-45.

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