Slavery in union controlled territory

uaskme

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Nov 9, 2016
Location
SE Tennessee
That's a great exaggeration. Here's a sample of what actually happened around Nashville:

Information from the "Report of Thomas Hood and S. W. Bostwick" (December 28, 1864)
"Of colored refugees who have performed work for the government and their pay."

"The number of colored refugees employed [at Nashville] by Captain Morton, and who have died without receiving their pay, is estimated at from six to eight hundred. This would be twenty-five per cent of the entire number employed by him; surely a most extraordinary mortality, the predicate for which we could not ascertain."

"...a very large proportion of them never will or can be paid."


#Laborers....#Paid
..2768......…..310 Nashville (under Capt. Morton)
..1383......…..387 Nashville (under Lt. Burroughs)
...227............128 Clarksville
...110.......…....71 Murfreesboro
...395........….....2 Fort Donaldson
.4883...….…...898 [18%]

Pay due laborers under Capt. Morton- $85,858.50
Amount paid- $13,648.00

Pay due laborers under Lt. Burroughs- $44,479.31
Amount paid- $16,358.00
Well, after all, these people were Black. Most Northerners didn’t think Blacks should be paid or were equal to Whites. That old Equality Myth.
 
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uaskme

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Nov 9, 2016
Location
SE Tennessee
Perhaps there were a few slaves that preferred slavery over freedom, but I'm not aware of any.
Lincoln was disappointed by the low numbers that fled to Union lines.

Something about Blacks not Trusting The Blue Boys who earlier forced them back to their Masters and fear of the treatment they would get within Union lines. Fear they might end up in Cuba. Guess some learned about Lincoln’s and others Colonization plans.
 

danny

Sergeant
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Location
Hattiesburg
The simple fact of the matter is that the entire logistical support necessary for the advance from Nashville to The Sea could not have happened without the enthusiastic participation of self-liberated people. In 1860, there were 72,000 slaves in the counties surrounding Nashville. Just as a raw number, that about equals the size of the Army of Tennessee. Simplistically, that is 72,000 man days of effort subtracted from the CSA & 72,000 added to the Union. Effectively, that is a net of 144,000 days effort gained day inn& day out. The net damage done to the CSA war effort & the force multiplier self-liberation was for the Union is incalculable.
Were they enthusiastic after Sherman let them drown in Georgia?
 

DanSBHawk

1st Lieutenant
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
That is a Narrative.

People usually have 2 reasons for their Actions. 1 reason they want you to believe. The other for why they did it.
I'll let other people do the psycho-analyzing of long dead historical persons.
 
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DanSBHawk

1st Lieutenant
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
That is why some study History and aren’t satisfied with a prevailing Narrative.

Curios why many focus on the Lost Cause and refuse to study other aspects of the War.
Whether a narrative is prevailing or not is less important than if the narrative is based on actual evidence.
 

19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
Natchez

"There is much sickness, suffering and destitution in this camp. There was not one
house that I visited where death had not entered its portals. The number of deaths
in families numbered from one to eleven. Seventy-five had died in a single day. I
was informed that some had returned to their masters on account of their suffering....

This camp had numbered four thousand at one time, now it is reduced to 2,100 —
a sad tale to tell, but nevertheless true. The same, I doubt not, can be said of
other camps. Whoever will ride along the levee from Milliken's Bend to Desoto
as I did, and see the numerous graves along the way, for the distance of twenty-
five miles, cannot doubt it."

-A report on the condition of the freedmen of the Mississippi : presented to the Western Sanitary Commission, December 17th, 1863 by James E. Yeatman, pp.13-14
 

DanSBHawk

1st Lieutenant
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
Natchez

"There is much sickness, suffering and destitution in this camp. There was not one
house that I visited where death had not entered its portals. The number of deaths
in families numbered from one to eleven. Seventy-five had died in a single day. I
was informed that some had returned to their masters on account of their suffering....

This camp had numbered four thousand at one time, now it is reduced to 2,100 —
a sad tale to tell, but nevertheless true. The same, I doubt not, can be said of
other camps. Whoever will ride along the levee from Milliken's Bend to Desoto
as I did, and see the numerous graves along the way, for the distance of twenty-
five miles, cannot doubt it."

-A report on the condition of the freedmen of the Mississippi : presented to the Western Sanitary Commission, December 17th, 1863 by James E. Yeatman, pp.13-14
I hope what is being suggested is not "blacks were better off enslaved."
 

DanSBHawk

1st Lieutenant
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
Are you suggesting that government slavery - work for no pay, no food, no medicine - was better?
Freedom is always better than slavery.

It's tragic that blacks suffered hardships during the war. It's tragic that they suffered slavery before the war. It's tragic that they suffered mistreatment for a hundred years after the war.

I'm sure white southern civilians outnumbered Union soldiers in Mississippi during the period you referenced. I wonder how many white southerners stepped up to help relieve the suffering of the freedmen and their families.
 

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