Slavery..How did it get it's start in North America?

JAGwinn

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THE SOUL OF
JOHN BROWN

BY
STEPHEN GRAHAM
New York
THE MACMILLAN COMPANY
1920
All Rights Reserved
[iv]
Copyright, 1920,
By THE MACMILLAN COMPANY
——
Set up and electrotyped. Published October, 1920.​


Not that anyone willed slavery in America or designed to have it. It was an economic accident. It was in America before most of the Americans. The first Negro slaves were brought up the James River in Virginia before the Mayflower arrived, and as Negro orators say to-day, “If being a long while in this country makes a good American, we are the best Americans that there are.” Slavery had grown to vast proportions by the time of the war against Britain. New America in 1783, standing on the threshold of the modern era, inherited a most terrible burden in her millions of slaves. It was a burden that was growing into the live flesh of America, and no one dared face at that time the problem of getting free of it.
[5]
The actual American people as a whole were little responsible for the institution of slavery. The pioneers hated and feared it. The planters always condemned it in theory, and after the Emancipation of 1863 no one of any sense in the South has ever wished it back. Even in those States where slavery took deepest root and showed its worst characteristics, there was throughout the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries a persistent resistance on the part of the colonists against having black servile labor introduced.
To cite one colony as in a way characteristic of the whole attitude of the colonists toward slavery, Georgia might be taken. Georgia was originally an asylum for the bad boys of too respectable British families and for discharged convicts and hopeless drunkards. Royal charter guaranteed freedom of religion (except to Papists); an embargo was placed on West Indian trade, so as to stop the inflow of rum; and Negro slavery was forbidden. All for the good of reprobates making a fresh start!
Invalids and merchants settled on the coast and made the society of Savannah. The bad boys proved to be too poor stuff with which to found a colony, and a special body of a hundred and thirty frugal and industrious Scots and a hundred and seventy carefully chosen Germans were brought in. Real work in Georgia commenced at Ebenezer, on the Savannah River,[6] and at New Inverness. The merchants strove to get slavery introduced; the Scots and the Germans strove to keep it out. At Savannah every night polite society toasted “The One Thing Needful”—Slavery. The common talk of the townsfolk was of the extra prosperity that would come to Georgia if slaves were brought in, the extra quantities of cotton, of rice, of timber, and all that middlemen could re-sell. The ministers of religion actually preached in churches in favor of an institution sanctioned by the Bible, and it was thought that a service was done for Christ by bringing the black men out of Africa, where they were somewhat inaccessible, and throwing them into the bosom of the Christian family in America. But the Scots and the Germans remonstrated against the permission of an evil shocking to human nature and likely to prove in time not a blessing but a scourge.

the book is here: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/48230
 

Drew

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"When it comes to slavery, the story that New England has long told itself goes like this: Slavery happened in the South, and it ended thanks to the North. Maybe
we had a little slavery, early on. But it wasn’t real slavery. We never had many slaves, and the ones we did have were practically family. We let them marry, we taught them to read, and soon enough, we freed them. New England is the home of abolitionists and underground railroads. In the story of slavery — and by extension, the story of race and racism in modern-day America — we’re the heroes. Aren’t we?"


http://archive.boston.com/bostonglobe/ideas/articles/2010/09/26/new_englands_hidden_history/

Does any of the bolded part sound familiar?

Let me answer the question, "How did it get its start in North America?"

New Englanders embraced the slave trade and peddled their wares to the South, that's how.
 

jgoodguy

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"When it comes to slavery, the story that New England has long told itself goes like this: Slavery happened in the South, and it ended thanks to the North. Maybe
we had a little slavery, early on. But it wasn’t real slavery. We never had many slaves, and the ones we did have were practically family. We let them marry, we taught them to read, and soon enough, we freed them. New England is the home of abolitionists and underground railroads. In the story of slavery — and by extension, the story of race and racism in modern-day America — we’re the heroes. Aren’t we?"


http://archive.boston.com/bostonglobe/ideas/articles/2010/09/26/new_englands_hidden_history/

Does any of the bolded part sound familiar?

Let me answer the question, "How did it get its start in North America?"

New Englanders embraced the slave trade and peddled their wares to the South, that's how.
Yep, the Yankees sold slaves to the innocents in the South.
 
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You need to go back before the Mayflower. The American Indian tribes in their many conflicts between themselves took prisoners and of the ones not killed they turned them into slaves. So the importation of African Negros were not the first slaves in America. Once the African slaves started to arrive by way of European intervention, it was short lived in the North, but the South seemed to embrace it as the normal course of affairs.
 

CSAPatriot

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From the same Boston Globe article:

"Perhaps no New England colony or state profited more from the unpaid labor of blacks than Rhode Island: Following the Revolution, scholars estimate, slave traders in the tiny Ocean State controlled between two-thirds and 90 percent of America’s trade in enslaved Africans"

It's absolutely fascinating to observe all the counterfeit, melodramatic, moralistic teeth-gnashing and hand-wringing that takes place when unionists piously point an accusing finger at the Confederacy and complain about the injustice of slavery. But all the while they casually ignore the palpable guilt of New England and the North for the severe abuses and extreme injustices they perpetrated as slave-owners and slave-traffickers. It's fascinating, and it's utterly appalling.
 

jgoodguy

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Slavery in the North lasted a long time???
Slavery in the British Colonies started in VA in 1619.
Slavery itself got started 6800 BCE in Mesopotamia.
Slavery was going strong until the 18th century when a number of factors weakened it including the American Revolution.
 

Drew

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Oct 22, 2012
Slavery in the North lasted a long time???

Yes, I think roughly 200 years is a long time. The Atlantic slave trade was outlawed around 1808 but New Englanders kept smuggling African slaves for generations afterwards.

The Port of New York was a famous haven for slave ships until 1860 when the Lincoln Administration finally decided to charge and hang a slave ship's captain. He was "hiding out" in New York City, with the rest of them.
 
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I read nowhere it says slavery didn't occur in the North. No one denies that, but also no one denies it grew and was commonplace in the South. North had it's own problems with legal immigration from Ireland and other European countries. In the West also from China. Employers would not hire nor if they did, pay a living wage. Coal miners lived in company housing and had to buy food from the same company. Railroad companies basically owned their workers like the coal mines. May not be called slavery, but a very fine line away.
As to stating the North perpetuated slavery is like putting all the blame on drug dealers for addiction. Without a market place for their product, it and they go elsewhere.
 

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"When it comes to slavery, the story that New England has long told itself goes like this: Slavery happened in the South, and it ended thanks to the North. Maybe
we had a little slavery, early on. But it wasn’t real slavery. We never had many slaves, and the ones we did have were practically family. We let them marry, we taught them to read, and soon enough, we freed them. New England is the home of abolitionists and underground railroads. In the story of slavery — and by extension, the story of race and racism in modern-day America — we’re the heroes. Aren’t we?"


http://archive.boston.com/bostonglobe/ideas/articles/2010/09/26/new_englands_hidden_history/

Does any of the bolded part sound familiar?

Let me answer the question, "How did it get its start in North America?"

New Englanders embraced the slave trade and peddled their wares to the South, that's how.

One might believe that if one had never read a single thing about the beginning of slavery in North America.

Those who have, however, are stuck with what actually happened, not with some psychosis about blaming one section or another.

Slavery in North America began when Dutch, Portuguese, and Spanish slave traders brought enslaved Africans to the continent. At first it wasn't cost effective in Virginia to buy a slave because the life expectancy was too short. The colonists at that point indentured the captured Africans, who were freed at the end of the indenture. Once colonists and their servants started living more than five years in the colony, it then became cost effective to purchase a slave and have his labor for the rest of his life. What we have seen from a legal standpoint is the first mentions of people legally enslaved in court records was in the Middle Colonies of Maryland and Virginia.
 

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Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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Location
Right here.
From the same Boston Globe article:

"Perhaps no New England colony or state profited more from the unpaid labor of blacks than Rhode Island: Following the Revolution, scholars estimate, slave traders in the tiny Ocean State controlled between two-thirds and 90 percent of America’s trade in enslaved Africans"

And America's trade was about 5% of the total Atlantic Slave Trade, meaning Rhode Island was responsible for between 3.3% and 4.5% of the Atlantic Slave Trade. Just under 6% of enslaved people transported in the Atlantic Slave Trade were transported to America.

It's absolutely fascinating to observe all the counterfeit, melodramatic, moralistic teeth-gnashing and hand-wringing that takes place when unionists piously point an accusing finger at the Confederacy and complain about the injustice of slavery. But all the while they casually ignore the palpable guilt of New England and the North for the severe abuses and extreme injustices they perpetrated as slave-owners and slave-traffickers. It's fascinating, and it's utterly appalling.

Apparently there's quite a bit of that psychosis going around.
 

Drew

Major
Joined
Oct 22, 2012
One might believe that if one had never read a single thing about the beginning of slavery in North America.

Those who have, however, are stuck with what actually happened, not with some psychosis about blaming one section or another.

Slavery in North America began when Dutch, Portuguese, and Spanish slave traders brought enslaved Africans to the continent. At first it wasn't cost effective in Virginia to buy a slave because the life expectancy was too short. The colonists at that point indentured the captured Africans, who were freed at the end of the indenture. Once colonists and their servants started living more than five years in the colony, it then became cost effective to purchase a slave and have his labor for the rest of his life. What we have seen from a legal st, andpoint is the first mentions of people legally enslaved in court records was in the Middle Colonies of Maryland and Virginia.

Oh, great. The OP asked, "Slavery..How did it get it's start in North America?"

You've invoked absolutely everyone except the people who actually lived in the North at the time and pushed it.

Grind your teeth all you like, there's no getting around the geography or "historiography" of where slavery came from.

It came from the North, that's where.
 

cash

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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Location
Right here.
Oh, great. The OP asked, "Slavery..How did it get it's start in North America?"

You've invoked absolutely everyone except the people who actually lived in the North at the time and pushed it.

Grind your teeth all you like, there's no getting around the geography or "historiography" of where slavery came from.

It came from the North, that's where.

If one has some psychological need to blame another section, I suppose ignoring the truth is needed.

For those of us who know the history and have no such problem, we're stuck with the truth. Read a book.
 
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