Slave sugar, free sugar, and sugar beet sugar.

Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Location
mo
It was dead yesterday and earlier this morning. Yesterday reconstruction and secession were dead as well. Glad they back up.
 

FedericoFCavada

First Sergeant
Joined
Jan 27, 2015
Location
San Antonio, Texas
After some arguments, I actually took some Vermont maple syrup with me to South America to prove to some people in Uruguay that, yes, there really is a maple tree in North America that is used to produce a sweet syrup, and no, sugar syrup made from sugar cane is not the only sweet thing aside from honey... Now here, try it! They hated it. Ah well... :nah disagree: :coffee:
 

SandiD

Private
Joined
Aug 18, 2021
Location
Somewhere in the Hudson Valley
After some arguments, I actually took some Vermont maple syrup with me to South America to prove to some people in Uruguay that, yes, there really is a maple tree in North America that is used to produce a sweet syrup, and no, sugar syrup made from sugar cane is not the only sweet thing aside from honey... Now here, try it! They hated it. Ah well... :nah disagree: :coffee:
That just means more for us maple syrup lovers. LOL
 
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FedericoFCavada

First Sergeant
Joined
Jan 27, 2015
Location
San Antonio, Texas
So how did the availability of inexpensive sugar change the diet and recipes of Americans in the present Civil War years? I will use the Northwest as an example. When settlers first moved there, the lack of wide spread transportation networks would have caused sugar to be very expensive. One would think honey and maple sugar would be used in cooking. Once the transportation network improved, then less expensive sugar would be used in recipes.
A complex question, certainly. Sugar consumption grows and grows and grows. As cited in the above article, over twelve pounds per person in the USA in 1830, and over thirty pounds per person on the eve of the Civil War... And today we have far more sweeteners--corn syrup as one notorious example--than existed in the past, and we show no signs of reducing our sugar intake in spite of all the "alternate" sources of sweetness.

Recall that sugar was actually refined in many of the eastern seaboard cities. Rum was distilled. Molasses was manufactured. Different grades and forms of sugar were produced. Before sugar sacks had been developed, it was shipped in casks. The barrel staves came from North America. Many of the ships. Many of the cod fish eaten by the sugar-producing slaves in the Caribbean were caught by North American fishermen. The ancillary trades involved are prodigious. One oddity about molasses is that it has iron content, but the iron comes from the machinery used to crush the sugar cane stalks, I think? Molasses was often used as a sauce to make bake bad food more palatable or at least interesting to eat... Imagine how "sweet" honey and natural fruits must have seemed in comparison to our now somewhat jaded tastes loaded with sugar, eh?
 

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
Aug 25, 2012
A complex question, certainly. Sugar consumption grows and grows and grows. As cited in the above article, over twelve pounds per person in the USA in 1830, and over thirty pounds per person on the eve of the Civil War... And today we have far more sweeteners--corn syrup as one notorious example--than existed in the past, and we show no signs of reducing our sugar intake in spite of all the "alternate" sources of sweetness.

Recall that sugar was actually refined in many of the eastern seaboard cities. Rum was distilled. Molasses was manufactured. Different grades and forms of sugar were produced. Before sugar sacks had been developed, it was shipped in casks. The barrel staves came from North America. Many of the ships. Many of the cod fish eaten by the sugar-producing slaves in the Caribbean were caught by North American fishermen. The ancillary trades involved are prodigious. One oddity about molasses is that it has iron content, but the iron comes from the machinery used to crush the sugar cane stalks, I think? Molasses was often used as a sauce to make bake bad food more palatable or at least interesting to eat... Imagine how "sweet" honey and natural fruits must have seemed in comparison to our now somewhat jaded tastes loaded with sugar, eh?
You mean that people are fresh peaches instead of canned peaches in heavy syrup? It does improve the taste of canned peaches by putting two or three teaspoons of sugar on top. Two or three tablespoons of sugar if you like you peaches sweet.
 
Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Location
mo
You mean that people are fresh peaches instead of canned peaches in heavy syrup? It does improve the taste of canned peaches by putting two or three teaspoons of sugar on top. Two or three tablespoons of sugar if you like you peaches sweet.
I was amazed to discover a couple years ago some people eat cottage cheese without adding tablespoon or two sugar on top........had always thought sugar and cottage cheese was a given......
 

KianGaf

First Sergeant
Joined
May 29, 2019
Location
Dublin, Ireland
Is beet sugar still widely grown ? I remember as a kid it was a heavily subsidised crop. The harvest season always saw piles upon piles of sugar beet on the side of farmers fields ready for collection. The subsidies ended and so did the practice of grown sugar beet. I’d imagine all our sugar is imported now. It’s a tough life farming life I’d say as they have to constantly adapt.
 

KianGaf

First Sergeant
Joined
May 29, 2019
Location
Dublin, Ireland
After some arguments, I actually took some Vermont maple syrup with me to South America to prove to some people in Uruguay that, yes, there really is a maple tree in North America that is used to produce a sweet syrup, and no, sugar syrup made from sugar cane is not the only sweet thing aside from honey... Now here, try it! They hated it. Ah well... :nah disagree: :coffee:

I love maple syrup on pancakes no knockoff imitation syrup will do. Although the majority of maple syrup I see on shelves seems to be Canadian produced , that must mean the Vermonters produce a premium syrup and most grocery stores are too cheap to stock it.
 

SandiD

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Somewhere in the Hudson Valley
I love maple syrup on pancakes no knockoff imitation syrup will do. Although the majority of maple syrup I see on shelves seems to be Canadian produced , that must mean the Vermonters produce a premium syrup and most grocery stores are too cheap to stock it.
I get a lot of locally produced maple syrup here in NY. One place with premium maple syrup is Crown Maple in Dutchess County, NY. I've been to the grove and sugar house. Pretty interesting place.
 

FedericoFCavada

First Sergeant
Joined
Jan 27, 2015
Location
San Antonio, Texas
Is beet sugar still widely grown ? I remember as a kid it was a heavily subsidised crop. The harvest season always saw piles upon piles of sugar beet on the side of farmers fields ready for collection. The subsidies ended and so did the practice of grown sugar beet. I’d imagine all our sugar is imported now. It’s a tough life farming life I’d say as they have to constantly adapt.
In the United States it most certainly is. Presumably in France and some other European locales it must be common too?
 

SandiD

Private
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Somewhere in the Hudson Valley
In the United States it most certainly is. Presumably in France and some other European locales it must be common too?
From the American Sugar Beet Growers Association - "Over 4.5 million tons of sugar are produced each year in the U.S. from sugar beets and beet sugar represents 54 percent of domestic sugar production in the U.S."

Sugar Beet History

US Sugar Production per USDA
 

Rhea Cole

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Nov 2, 2019
Location
Murfreesboro, Tennessee
As far as I know, sorghum molasses is the elixir of the gods where sweets are concerned. My Dad always had to have a jar on hand. He would put a blob on his plate & throughly mix butter into it. A warm biscuit or cornbread with a slathering of sorghum butter melting into it is a taste of heaven on earth.
 
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Rhea Cole

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Nov 2, 2019
Location
Murfreesboro, Tennessee
French Royal government essentially traded Canada fo the Brits in order to keep highly lucrative sugar islands.

Napoleon took possession of Louisiana from the Spanish for the purpose of feeding slaves on Hispaniola. The regiments intended to occupy New Orleans & the Mississippi Valley were diverted to Haiti to suppress the slave revolt there, As we know, they were all but wiped out by self liberated slaves & mosquitos. As a result, Napoleon had no further use for the North American Continent. That was why Jefferson was able to get Louisiana at a bargain price.

Should you have the pleasure of visiting the new Saint Genevieve MO National Park, consider taking the ferry across the Mississippi River to Charleroi, a stone walled French fort. The garrison was set down in the midst of a howling wilderness to gather a corn tax from local Indians.

Charleroi was given away in some treaty or other. It took the British years to send a unit to accept possession & let the French garrison go home.
 

Fairfield

Sergeant Major
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Dec 5, 2019
After some arguments, I actually took some Vermont maple syrup with me to South America to prove to some people in Uruguay that, yes, there really is a maple tree in North America that is used to produce a sweet syrup, and no, sugar syrup made from sugar cane is not the only sweet thing aside from honey... Now here, try it! They hated it. Ah well... :nah disagree: :coffee:
Maple syrup is very, very sweet--and not everyone's taste. A friend once sent a bottle of it to relatives in England and, when she asked later how they liked it, they responded that it was so sweet that they could drink only a little bit at a time! :frown:
 

SandiD

Private
Joined
Aug 18, 2021
Location
Somewhere in the Hudson Valley
As far as I know, sorghum molasses is the elixir of the gods where seeets are concerned. My Dad always had to have a jar on hand. He would put a blob on his plate & throughly mix butter into it. A warm biscuit or cornbread with a slathering of sorghum butter melting into it is a taste of heaven on earth.
I'm a big fan of molasses - molasses cookies, molasses on my pancakes, molasses in my oatmeal, and on and on.
 
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