Sir Walter Scott: Tales of Long(er) Ago

grace

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#1
After some time away, I'm back from a different era, one that captured my heart and many other hearts of this time as well. England long ago viewed through the rosy tint of the present day.

Sir Walter Scott had replaced Miss Austen by this point! He's mentioned in the Little House books, but he was a popular author twenty or so years before. Even though many of the things that made him so loved back then are seen at best as hopelessly dated today, he's still read a little from time to time.

In many ways, he offered an escape from the daily life of the mid-19th woman and man. He lived from 1771-1832 and was loved by many people.

And apparently, he started the Civil War. Hm!

https://harpers.org/blog/2007/07/how-walter-scott-started-the-american-civil-war/

Methinks the author dost protest too much!
 

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John Hartwell

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#2
That was Mark Twain's conclusion. See: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/the-chivalry-prepares-for-war.98563/#post-85578

Many upper class southerners did take to heart Scott's romanticizing of personal honor and Chivalry -- at least they liked to imagine themselves a part of that fairy-tale world. The imagery was continued by the postwar Lost Cause writers, who wound up making the antebellum South into a sort of Magic Kingdom of gallant knights, gracious ladies, and happy, contented peasants.
 

Cavalry Charger

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#3
Such enormous responisibility applied to an author, as though he created the world in which Southerners, and Northerners, existed.

That people found value is in his prose says more about them than the author.

Progress and reason, according to the article, appear to determine that 'romance' and 'chivalry' are not fitting. I disagree.

The many parts make up the whole, and though an existence may mar progress, it is not altogether worthless.

Some ideas may need to take on greater value, and others less, but like any story, real or imagined, it is still being written.
 
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#8
I think Scott sold well in the North also. The Medieval festivals which cropped up in South might well have been an outgrowth of the books. In Missouri I am sure these festivals were held in St. Louis, and I know of one held in Palmyra, Mo. in the North of the state. Twain in Huckleberry Finn named a sinking Steamboat the Walter Scott as a sort of joke or pun. A real boat that Twain served aboard as a cub pilot was named the Aleck Scott. Great thread.
 

Vicksburger

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#9
After some time away, I'm back from a different era, one that captured my heart and many other hearts of this time as well. England long ago viewed through the rosy tint of the present day.

Sir Walter Scott had replaced Miss Austen by this point! He's mentioned in the Little House books, but he was a popular author twenty or so years before. Even though many of the things that made him so loved back then are seen at best as hopelessly dated today, he's still read a little from time to time.

In many ways, he offered an escape from the daily life of the mid-19th woman and man. He lived from 1771-1832 and was loved by many people.

And apparently, he started the Civil War. Hm!

https://harpers.org/blog/2007/07/how-walter-scott-started-the-american-civil-war/

Methinks the author dost protest too much!
My favorite author is Sir Walter Scott. There are some threads on him here at CWT. I think he was the writer that popularized the Highlanders/Jacobite struggle pitting an underdog (Scots clans/Jacobites) taking on a much stronger power (British) and the analogy
Sir Walter Scott.jpg
to the Confederates is obvious. He was in my judgment one of the greatest men who ever lived. Be sure to read his Waverley Novels.
 

grace

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#10
@Vicksburger, the parallels are evident and speak to the draw of both "lost causes" years and years later. Thank you for pointing that out!

I've read Ivanhoe, The Talisman, Rob Roy, and a few others. I really love Talisman; have you read it?
 

Vicksburger

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#11
@Vicksburger, the parallels are evident and speak to the draw of both "lost causes" years and years later. Thank you for pointing that out!

I've read Ivanhoe, The Talisman, Rob Roy, and a few others. I really love Talisman; have you read it?
@Vicksburger, the parallels are evident and speak to the draw of both "lost causes" years and years later. Thank you for pointing that out!

I've read Ivanhoe, The Talisman, Rob Roy, and a few others. I really love Talisman; have you read it?
Yes and did you know there is a 1950's movie on "the Talisman" but it is not called that , they changed the name to: "King Richard and the Crusaders." It is on TV occasionally, if you get TCM it will probably be on sometime this spring. I taped it and when I watch it I am reminded of just how clever Sir Walter is! If you have not read his "Scottish" Waverley Novels don't be put off by the Scottish Gaelic language that he loves to use. Just skip all the Introductory chapters and start with chapter one. I think Guy Mannering and The Antiquary are two of his best.
 

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