Sherman Sherman's Wartime Record

Joined
Jun 27, 2017
Even considering the Atlanta campaign, I would barely adequate at best. Considering only that campaign in which he had great numerical superiority his strategy was to use the broken terrain to threaten his opponent's main defense and flank him to the west. Ideally this move allows him to cut the enemy's route of retreat and trap him between two forces or send him in precipitous flight. Say what you will about Joe Johnston but he always managed to avoid either option.

Having proved to everyone but himself the efficacy of this approach, he abandons it at Kennesaw Mt in fruitless frontal assaults against a dug in enemy. Yep, genius.

I really would have loved to have seen Davis's relief order replacing him with Hood delayed for a week or two to see how the Battle of Peachtree Creek would have played out with a competent Johnston at the helm instead of Hood.

I wonder did Sherman send Hood thank you cards for each of his fruitless frontal attacks against a superior force.

But then one of the great accolades Sherman is given is for his imaginative strategy of marching through Georgia, destroying the enemy's will to resist.

Much is made of spreading his army over much of the width of Ga, confusing the enemy as to what his goal was. The only problem with this conclusion is that it is absolutely false. First Sherman left Atlanta driving a herd of 5000 cattle with him. Even with this moving food factory when his exhausted army reached the outskirts of Savannah they were close to starvation. This was true even though spread out as they were allowed them to forage across the countryside. Second there was no opposition, a few home guards most of whom probably had to think how to load their weapons and had probably never heard a shot fired in anger.

Think about the consequences of Hood not haring off to Tenn. Or realizing what Sherman was doing had turned to harry him. If he continues his 3 column advance, any of the columns may be attacked by his follower. Thus he would have had to inevitably move to consolidate his army. Unfortunately this would have inhibited foraging and much more rapidly depleted his supplies. Suppose Athena, goddess of wisdom personally comes down to slap Hood's head hard enough to get his 2 brain cells to rub together and inspire him to immediately send for Forrest who immediately harries Sherman's flanks incessantly. Who makes him deploy for battle to cross every creek.

In essence he would have been imprisoned in a trap of his own making. He cannot reach the sea for succor. He cannot return to Atlanta. Soon his only option would have been ignominious surrender, possibly without even the need for a pitched battle.
 

Lubliner

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Nov 27, 2018
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Chattanooga, Tennessee
Even considering the Atlanta campaign, I would barely adequate at best. Considering only that campaign in which he had great numerical superiority his strategy was to use the broken terrain to threaten his opponent's main defense and flank him to the west. Ideally this move allows him to cut the enemy's route of retreat and trap him between two forces or send him in precipitous flight. Say what you will about Joe Johnston but he always managed to avoid either option.

Having proved to everyone but himself the efficacy of this approach, he abandons it at Kennesaw Mt in fruitless frontal assaults against a dug in enemy. Yep, genius.

I really would have loved to have seen Davis's relief order replacing him with Hood delayed for a week or two to see how the Battle of Peachtree Creek would have played out with a competent Johnston at the helm instead of Hood.

I wonder did Sherman send Hood thank you cards for each of his fruitless frontal attacks against a superior force.

But then one of the great accolades Sherman is given is for his imaginative strategy of marching through Georgia, destroying the enemy's will to resist.

Much is made of spreading his army over much of the width of Ga, confusing the enemy as to what his goal was. The only problem with this conclusion is that it is absolutely false. First Sherman left Atlanta driving a herd of 5000 cattle with him. Even with this moving food factory when his exhausted army reached the outskirts of Savannah they were close to starvation. This was true even though spread out as they were allowed them to forage across the countryside. Second there was no opposition, a few home guards most of whom probably had to think how to load their weapons and had probably never heard a shot fired in anger.

Think about the consequences of Hood not haring off to Tenn. Or realizing what Sherman was doing had turned to harry him. If he continues his 3 column advance, any of the columns may be attacked by his follower. Thus he would have had to inevitably move to consolidate his army. Unfortunately this would have inhibited foraging and much more rapidly depleted his supplies. Suppose Athena, goddess of wisdom personally comes down to slap Hood's head hard enough to get his 2 brain cells to rub together and inspire him to immediately send for Forrest who immediately harries Sherman's flanks incessantly. Who makes him deploy for battle to cross every creek.

In essence he would have been imprisoned in a trap of his own making. He cannot reach the sea for succor. He cannot return to Atlanta. Soon his only option would have been ignominious surrender, possibly without even the need for a pitched battle.
It is a very good and strong point on having the confederates maintain control near Sherman's army. I believe if/when caught in the trap, central Georgia, he would have turned south toward the gulf.
Lubliner.
 
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