US Con -Sherman, John - U.S. Senator, OH

John Sherman

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John Sherman.jpg


Born: May 10, 1823

Birthplace: Lancaster, Ohio

Father: Judge Charles Robert Sherman 1788 – 1829
(Buried: Elmwood Cemetery, Lancaster, Ohio)​

Mother: Mary Hoyt 1787 – 1852
(Buried: Elmwood Cemetery, Lancaster, Ohio)​

Brother: General William Tecumseh Sherman 1820 – 1891
(Buried: Calvary Cemetery and Mausoleum, St. Louis, Missouri)​

Wife: Margaret Cecilia “Cecilia” Stewart 1827 – 1900
(Buried: Mansfield Cemetery, Mansfield, Ohio)​

Political Party:

Before – 1854: Member of Whig Party
1854 – 1858: Member of Oppositionist Party
1858 – 1900: Member of Republican Party

Occupation before War:

1837 – 1839: Junior Surveyor Muskingum River Improvements​
1844 – 1853: Attorney in Mansfield, Ohio​
1844: Campaigner for Henry Clay Presidential Campaign​
1848: Ohio Delegate to Whig Party National Convention​
1850: Supporter of the Compromise of 1850​
1852: Ohio Delegate to Whig Party National Convention​
1853 – 1855: Attorney in Cleveland, Ohio
Death.jpg
1855 – 1861: United States Congressman from Ohio​
1855 – 1857: Member of House Foreign Affairs Committee​
Spent two months in Kansas Territory, writing 1,188 Page Report​
1857: Presented home of his first Speeches on the financial situation​
1857 – 1859: Member of House Naval Affairs Committee​
1860 – 1861: Chairman of House Ways and Means Committee​
1860 – 1861: Member of House Navy Department Expenditures Committee​
Supporter of the bill admitting Kansas into the Union​
1860: Campaigner for Abraham Lincoln Presidential Campaign​

Civil War Career:

1861 – 1877: United States Senator from Ohio​
1861 – 1863: Member of Senate Finance Committee​
1861: Visited the White House with his brother to meet President Lincoln.​
1861: Served briefly as unpaid Colonel of Ohio Volunteers​
1861: Endorsed the Revenue Act of 1861​
1861: Voted in support of the Confiscation Act of 1861​
1863: Introduced the National Banking Act of 1863 in U.S. Senate.​
1863 – 1867: Chairman of Senate Agriculture Committee​
1864 – 1865: Chairman of Senate Finance Committee​
1864: Voted in support of the 13th​ Amendment to U.S. Constitution.​
1864: Campaigner for Abraham Lincoln reelection Campaign.​
1865 – 1867: Member of Senate Finance Committee​
1865 – 1867: Member of Senate Audit and Control of Contingent Expenses Committee​
1865: Attended President Lincolns second inauguration​
1865: Attended the Grand Review of Armies in Washington, D.C.​

Occupation after War:

1861 – 1877: United States Senator from Ohio​
1863 – 1867: Chairman of Senate Agriculture Committee​
1865 – 1867: Member of Senate Finance Committee​
1865 – 1867: Member of Senate Audit and Control of Contingent Expenses Committee​
1866: Voted in support of the Fourteenth Amendment to Constitution​
1867 – 1877: Chairman of Senate Finance Committee​
1867: Voted in support of the Tenure of Office Act​
1868: Voted in support of the Impeachment of Andrew Johnson​
1871 – 1873: Member of Senate Library Committee​
1873: Leader for the passage of Coinage Act of 1873​
1876: Went to New Orleans to ensure Hayes was elected President.​
1877 – 1881: United States Secretary of Treasury
Death 1.jpg
1881 – 1897: United States Senator from Ohio​
1881 – 1885: Member of Senate Finance Committee​
1881 – 1885: Chairman of Senate Library Committee​
1883: Supporter of The Mongrel Tariff​
1883 – 1885: Member of Senate Foreign Affairs Committee​
1884 – 1885: Chairman of Republican Party Senate Conference​
1884: Received 30 Delegate Votes for Republican Party Nomination​
1885: Voted in favor of the Alien Contract Labor Law​
1885 – 1887: President Pro Tempore of United States Senate​
1886 – 1893: Chairman of Senate Foreign Relations Committee​
1887 – 1889: Member of Senate Finance Committee​
1887 – 1889: Member of Senate Expenditures of Public Money Committee​
1887: His influence showed results in Interstate Commerce Act​
1888: Ran second for the Republican Party Nomination​
1890: Introduced Sherman Antitrust Act​
1890: Leader of Sherman Silver Purchase Act​
1891 – 1897: Chairman of Republican Party Senate Conference​
1891 – 1893: Member of Senate Finance Committee​
1895 – 1897: Chairman of Senate Foreign Relations Committee​
1895 – 1897: Member of Senate Finance Committee​
1897 – 1898: United States Secretary of State​
1898: Resigned as U.S. Secretary of State on April 25th​

Died:
October 22, 1900

Place of Death: Washington, D.C.

Age at time of Death: 77 years old

Burial Place: Mansfield Cemetery, Mansfield, Ohio
 
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During December 1859, South Carolina's congressman Porcher Miles and a handful of others, using as a pretext the impending elevation of Republican John Sherman to Speaker of the House, were prepared to unleash gunfire and slaughter inside the Congress to start a war. Although South Carolina's governor advised against bloodshed if possible, he was prepared for it and would go along with it:

"If that plan was adopted, a bloody revolution would be inevitable, and although I am prepared to wade in blood rather than submit to inequality and degradation; yet if a bloodless revolution can be effected, of course it would be preferable. If, however, you upon consultation decide to make the issue of force in Washington, write or telegraph me, and I will have a regiment in or near Washington in the shortest possible time.

"When I advise against the ejection of Sherman if elected I do not wish to be understood as not desiring the war to begin at Washington; but as I would prefer it should begin in sudden heat & with good provocation rather than a deliberate determination to perform an act of violence which might prejudice us in the eyes of the world."

Excerpt from the December 20, 1859 Letter from Governor William Gist to Congressman William Porcher Miles,
The Mississippi Valley Historical Review, Vol. XXIX, No. 3, December 1942, pg. 334
 

Polloco

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Salmon P. Chase resigned his seat in the Senate to become Lincoln's Secretary of the Treasury. This is the seat Sherman filled. He had to resign his seat in the House to do so.He held that seat through several elections , finally resigning on March 8, 1877 to become Rutherford Hayes' Secretary of the Treasury.
 
"You have got things into a hell of a fix, and you may get them out the best you can."

- William Tecumseh Sherman to John Sherman
This was following John Sherman's introduction of William T. -- who was fresh up from resigning as the head of the Louisiana Military Academy -- to President Lincoln. Lincoln had asked how things were going down there and William T. told him that they were preparing for war. Lincoln responded to the effect "we'll manage the house."
 

Pete Longstreet

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This was following John Sherman's introduction of William T. -- who was fresh up from resigning as the head of the Louisiana Military Academy -- to President Lincoln. Lincoln had asked how things were going down there and William T. told him that they were preparing for war. Lincoln responded to the effect "we'll manage the house."
Good point. I remember reading Tecumseh Sherman was disgusted with Lincoln regarding that response.
 

Polloco

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Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
Salmon P. Chase resigned his seat in the Senate to become Lincoln's Secretary of the Treasury. This is the seat Sherman filled. He had to resign his seat in the House to do so.He held that seat through several elections , finally resigning on March 8, 1877 to become Rutherford Hayes' Secretary of the Treasury.
He again filled a vacancy in the Senate when Hayes' term was up. This time filling the seat that James Garfield would have taken had he not been elected to the Presidency. He held this seat until 1897 when he again resigned to take a cabinet post. This time as William McKinley's Secretary of State.
 
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