Shenandoah 1864 2019 Lovettsville, Virginia

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I cannot claim ownership of these, but they were posted in the group Facebook page. My impression is 1st Vermont Heavy Artillery. My Company was selected men from the VI Corps to act as light infantry and 2nd Company was from the Vermont Brigade. So I am a Heavy Artillery turned Infantry turned Sharpshooter.
The adjunct was handled very well. We bivouacked in the field; the only canvas set up in the battalion was the commander's dog tent Friday night. We had pickets out all that night, then at dawn were up and on the march to engage the rebel p/c/h crowd. I had my first cup of coffee mid-morning on post. The only time we really saw the rest of the army's camp was when we marched through it en route to the Saturday spectator battle. The rest of the time we marched and fought in the woods surrounding the fields where the main events were held.

The only item I'd take issue with was the claim of 1,200 participants in the newspaper account. We might have had 250-275 federals, including cavalry and artillery, and at most twice that of Confederates -- probably more along the lines of 400. At least that's what I saw in the field. I've no idea how many civilians or staff officers were around. That's not a criticism, by the way -- the numbers fit very well with the amount of land available for the overall event and the "battles," with plenty of elbow room for maneuvering. The Saturday evening fight was a thing of beauty.

shenandoah 64a.jpg
shenandoah 64c.jpg
 
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JPChurch

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Manassas VA
Where exactly was this event at in Lovettsville??? Off what road???? Whose farmland? I would have stopped by, I have friends in Lovettsville......It's all horse country out that way for the most part...……….but it's getting developed more and more every year...……...Loudon county ain't all horse and beef critters and milk cows anymore. Try driving through Leesburg....UGGGHHHHHHH
 

7thWisconsin

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The adjunct was handled very well. We bivouacked in the field; the only canvas set up in the battalion was the commander's dog tent Friday night. We had pickets out all that night, then at dawn were up and on the march to engage the rebel p/c/h crowd. I had my first cup of coffee mid-morning on post. The only time we really saw the rest of the army's camp was when we marched through it en route to the Saturday spectator battle. The rest of the time we marched and fought in the woods surrounding the fields where the main events were held.

The only item I'd take issue with was the claim of 1,200 participants in the newspaper account. We might have had 250-275 federals, including cavalry and artillery, and at most twice that of Confederates -- probably more along the lines of 400. At least that's what I saw in the field. I've no idea how many civilians or staff officers were around. That's not a criticism, by the way -- the numbers fit very well with the amount of land available for the overall event and the "battles," with plenty of elbow room for maneuvering. The Saturday evening fight was a thing of beauty.

View attachment 329336View attachment 329338
You guys looked great. Not to pick a fight, but one of the things that frustrates me about adjunct detachments is that they tend to self-segregate away from the rest of the event. We didn't see much of you. We were impressed, but at first just kept asking "who are those guys?". In addition, you didn't get to see or enjoy the presence of a lot of other good reenactors. I have no idea of attendance tallies, and they're not always indicative of the quality of the event. I don't know if anyone else has used the phrase, but I've been describing this as a good example of a "crossover event." High-end mainstream, modest c/p/h.
 

Claude Bauer

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Where exactly was this event at in Lovettsville??? Off what road???? Whose farmland? I would have stopped by, I have friends in Lovettsville......It's all horse country out that way for the most part...……….but it's getting developed more and more every year...……...Loudon county ain't all horse and beef critters and milk cows anymore. Try driving through Leesburg....UGGGHHHHHHH
The event location was:

40371 Quarter Branch Road
Lovettsville, VA 20180
Google Map Location

A nice piece of property near the town of Lovettsville.
 
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Claude Bauer

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The Saturday evening fight was a thing of beauty.
I didn't stick around for the evening battle on Saturday--I'm glad those who participated enjoyed it, but I don't do battle reenactments that are closed to the public anymore. I used to, but after a while it felt to me like we were putting on a play for an empty theater. I know some reenactors prefer them and even attend EBUFU events (events by us and for us) where the whole weekend is closed to the public, but I'm not into that. To each their own. Don't want to derail this thread with a discussion on the topic, just want people to know that not all of these events are open to the public.
 
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JPChurch

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Manassas VA
Tacticals were great...last one I was in was down at Saylor's Creek/Appomattox back in like 1990, we were real close to the actual battlefield, then the next day arms were stacked for the Surrender. Tacticals can get dangerous, I saw a lot of busted noggins, bloody noses, soaking wet uniforms and shoes, jerked out knees and twisted ankles...….it's the real deal, none of this encampment stuff so all the spectators can gawk in awe...….
 
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Package4

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Pictures are starting to come in from the Shenandoah 1864 event:

This my unit, which had the largest turnout of any Federal group there:
View attachment 328380

There were a surprising number of mounted soldiers considering the size of the event:
View attachment 328381

Many of the participants camped "campaign" style.
View attachment 328382

A soldier polishes his brass using a buffstick and wet ash from the campfire:
View attachment 328383

A Federal company waiting to go into action (photo by Kimberly Schwatka):
View attachment 328384

Sunrise from the Federal camp (photo by Kimberly Schwatka):
View attachment 328385

Confederates getting ready for battle (photo by Brad Ireland):
View attachment 328386

Confederate supply wagon (photo by Brad Ireland):
View attachment 328387

Some period looking pictures from the National Regiment by Jack Puskar:
View attachment 328506

View attachment 328507

This fella is a member of the Christian Commission:
View attachment 328508

View attachment 328509
It was a very good event, my only criticism would have to be the ubiquitous A tents, that were present in both camps. Hopefully they will be dispensed with, for RR Production's two events coming up next year.
 

Package4

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I just received this missive from Chris, as did all others who registered for the event, please read and put these on your calendar for 2020:

Fellow Living Historians,

Thank you for all that you did to make Shenandoah 1864 all we ever dreamed it could be.


The teamwork and dedication to history you displayed is what made the event so successful.

I want to especially thank the Shenandoah Valley Battlefield Foundation, Doug Dobbs, Bill Watson, Ted Brennan, Mike Lavis, Laurel Scott, Brian Gesuero, Andrew Dangel, Tom Downes, Dick Watters, Gordon Grahe, Jesiah McCann, Mike Sheibe,Heath Fleming, Todd Kerns, Kevin Dawson, Audrey Teller,Dan McLean, Tom Craig and the entire team for making the vision happen.

But above all, it was the troops in the ranks that made the event so very special.

As I have often said, we only build the stage upon which you act, and you guys all deserve the highest praise for your efforts.


And even better yet, the landowner was thrilled with the manner in which you all took great care of his property, and wants us back!

And we are looking at 2021 to return to the site....more on that later.

But moving into 2020, Rear Rank Productions has released the following regarding next years twin events.

We are organizing two different events, with different goals for each.

More information will be coming out shortly, but I wanted to get this to you as soon as possible.

Watch for more updates!!

*****************************************************************************

October 14, 2019
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact- S. Chris Anders
[email protected]
Rear Rank Productions Announces Two 2020 Events

Lovettsville, VA—Rear Rank Productions is pleased to announce two events for the year 2020: Lee’s Last Stand, a semi-immersion event depicting the actions of late March of 1865; and Slaughter on the Mountain, a larger-scale event on original ground at Cedar Mountain.
“By offering two distinctly different events, we can cater to the desires of a wide variety of reenactors,” said S. Chris Anders, president of Rear Rank Productions. “ As a team we have produced both semi-immersion Burkittsville 1862 and War on the James, as well as larger events such as September Storm, At High Tide, Campaign Before Richmond, Maryland My Maryland, On to Richmond and Shenandoah 1864. As a team we are excited to bring both styles of events to the hobby in 2020.”
Lee’s Last Stand, scheduled for April 3-5, 2020 at Endview Plantation in Newport News, Virginia, will be a moving, all-campaign impression event with strict participation regulations and limited numbers. This event will feature a public interpretation portion as well as 36-hour, nonstop first-person action portraying the final days of the Army of Northern Virginia in and around Petersburg, Virginia.
Slaughter on the Mountain, the reenactment of the Battle of Cedar Mountain, will be held August 7-9, 2020 near Culpeper, Virginia, as a joint venture with the Valley Guards and the Friends of Cedar Mountain Battlefield. This event will feature both campaign and garrison impressions like Shenandoah 1864, replicating the various actions during the Battle of Cedar Mountain on the exact ground over which they occurred. Slaughter on the Mountain is limited to 2,000 participants, with all proceeds going to the continued preservation of the Cedar Mountain Battlefield.
“By presenting both unique events to the hobby, we hope to provide a variety of experiences,” Anders explained. “It has been years since RRP has produced a semi-immersion event, complete with ration issue and non-stop action—and there has not been a reenactment on the original land at Cedar Mountain since 1987. We are proud to offer both events and look forward to many years of producing events for reenactors by reenactors, including possibly both the 160th First Manassas and Ball’s Bluff events.” Registration details will be forthcoming.
###
Thank you again for all your efforts to make Shenandoah the sucess that it was!

And now forward into 2020!


Sincerely,
%2F14460c0f4bb958b9b1c1e0b30%2Fimages%2FChris_blue.jpg


S. Chris Anders
RRP, LLC
 

captaindrew

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I just received this missive from Chris, as did all others who registered for the event, please read and put these on your calendar for 2020:

Fellow Living Historians,

Thank you for all that you did to make Shenandoah 1864 all we ever dreamed it could be.


The teamwork and dedication to history you displayed is what made the event so successful.

I want to especially thank the Shenandoah Valley Battlefield Foundation, Doug Dobbs, Bill Watson, Ted Brennan, Mike Lavis, Laurel Scott, Brian Gesuero, Andrew Dangel, Tom Downes, Dick Watters, Gordon Grahe, Jesiah McCann, Mike Sheibe,Heath Fleming, Todd Kerns, Kevin Dawson, Audrey Teller,Dan McLean, Tom Craig and the entire team for making the vision happen.

But above all, it was the troops in the ranks that made the event so very special.

As I have often said, we only build the stage upon which you act, and you guys all deserve the highest praise for your efforts.


And even better yet, the landowner was thrilled with the manner in which you all took great care of his property, and wants us back!

And we are looking at 2021 to return to the site....more on that later.

But moving into 2020, Rear Rank Productions has released the following regarding next years twin events.

We are organizing two different events, with different goals for each.

More information will be coming out shortly, but I wanted to get this to you as soon as possible.

Watch for more updates!!

*****************************************************************************

October 14, 2019
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact- S. Chris Anders
[email protected]
Rear Rank Productions Announces Two 2020 Events

Lovettsville, VA—Rear Rank Productions is pleased to announce two events for the year 2020: Lee’s Last Stand, a semi-immersion event depicting the actions of late March of 1865; and Slaughter on the Mountain, a larger-scale event on original ground at Cedar Mountain.
“By offering two distinctly different events, we can cater to the desires of a wide variety of reenactors,” said S. Chris Anders, president of Rear Rank Productions. “ As a team we have produced both semi-immersion Burkittsville 1862 and War on the James, as well as larger events such as September Storm, At High Tide, Campaign Before Richmond, Maryland My Maryland, On to Richmond and Shenandoah 1864. As a team we are excited to bring both styles of events to the hobby in 2020.”
Lee’s Last Stand, scheduled for April 3-5, 2020 at Endview Plantation in Newport News, Virginia, will be a moving, all-campaign impression event with strict participation regulations and limited numbers. This event will feature a public interpretation portion as well as 36-hour, nonstop first-person action portraying the final days of the Army of Northern Virginia in and around Petersburg, Virginia.
Slaughter on the Mountain, the reenactment of the Battle of Cedar Mountain, will be held August 7-9, 2020 near Culpeper, Virginia, as a joint venture with the Valley Guards and the Friends of Cedar Mountain Battlefield. This event will feature both campaign and garrison impressions like Shenandoah 1864, replicating the various actions during the Battle of Cedar Mountain on the exact ground over which they occurred. Slaughter on the Mountain is limited to 2,000 participants, with all proceeds going to the continued preservation of the Cedar Mountain Battlefield.
“By presenting both unique events to the hobby, we hope to provide a variety of experiences,” Anders explained. “It has been years since RRP has produced a semi-immersion event, complete with ration issue and non-stop action—and there has not been a reenactment on the original land at Cedar Mountain since 1987. We are proud to offer both events and look forward to many years of producing events for reenactors by reenactors, including possibly both the 160th First Manassas and Ball’s Bluff events.” Registration details will be forthcoming.
###
Thank you again for all your efforts to make Shenandoah the sucess that it was!

And now forward into 2020!


Sincerely,
View attachment 329583

S. Chris Anders
RRP, LLC
Sounds like some great things coming, will definitely try to make on of their events, going to circle the August date for sure.
 
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You guys looked great. Not to pick a fight, but one of the things that frustrates me about adjunct detachments is that they tend to self-segregate away from the rest of the event. We didn't see much of you. We were impressed, but at first just kept asking "who are those guys?". In addition, you didn't get to see or enjoy the presence of a lot of other good reenactors. I have no idea of attendance tallies, and they're not always indicative of the quality of the event. I don't know if anyone else has used the phrase, but I've been describing this as a good example of a "crossover event." High-end mainstream, modest c/p/h.
Rob, I don't know about others, but for me the point of attending a "campaigner adjunct" is to feel as much as possible as if I were on campaign. That would not have been possible if we had set up next to fixed camps with their A tents or neat lines of dog tents, their sprawling headquarters and "living history" hospital displays , all with the furniture and fireside conversations lasting well into the night.

Again, that's not meant as a criticism, but if I had wanted that experience I would have fallen in with one of those units. At some point in the future I probably will. But if I sign up for a "campaigner adjunct" it usually means that I also don't want to have parking, the sutlers, the water tanks, and the porta-johns in my viewshed. I know that can look standoffish, but it's really just a matter of wanting a different experience. If people want to see more of us, they can always sign up. :wink:
 
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I didn't stick around for the evening battle on Saturday--I'm glad those who participated enjoyed it, but I don't do battle reenactments that are closed to the public anymore. I used to, but after a while it felt to me like we were putting on a play for an empty theater. I know some reenactors prefer them and even attend EBUFU events (events by us and for us) where the whole weekend is closed to the public, but I'm not into that. To each their own. Don't want to derail this thread with a discussion on the topic, just want people to know that not all of these events are open to the public.
We had the advantage of having two encounters with the opposition. We had started the day Saturday engaging the p/c/h rebels a few hundred yards apart from the rest of the event and that was the real high point of the event. For me it's not like putting on a play in an empty theater as much as coming a little closer to the experience of actual 19th century combat. The emphasis is on execution of commands and individual performance rather than stage acting -- consider it analogous to people exercising the skills playing soccer or flag football in a public park. Often there's no audience but the players, and they have just as fine as time as they would being watched by a crowd that didn't know the rules... :smile:
 
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