Shelby Foote's Shiloh Novel

mofederal

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I ran into this first edition paperback cover of Shelby Foote's Shiloh. I had never seen this early of an edition of the book before. First published in 1952. I think the paperback book was published in 1954.

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I thought it was an easy read. But very enjoyable. I couldn't put it down. I plan on reading it again.
Same here.

It's been many years since I've read this work.
I have a 1990's hardback reprint somewhere.

I do remember being pleasantly surprised !

But I would classify it as a long "short story" rather than a novel.
However, that's only my opinion.

:smoke:
 

Bill_S

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It was based upon the quality of this novel, that Random House selected Mr. Foote to write a "short" civil war history! Which as we all know, became the acclaimed three volume The Civil War: A Narrative.

But I would classify it as a long "short story" rather than a novel.
However, that's only my opinion.

I would agree. It is an enjoyable read and certainly worth a try.

Cheers
 
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Which as we all know, became the acclaimed three volume The Civil War: A Narrative.
The Beleagured City: The Vicksburg Campaign, is another another good quick read.

Before his death, Foote was with the Modern Library publishing company.

He wrote nothing new, but did select enough parts of his narrative to create a very good "Cliff Notes" version of his own famous work.

He did the same with Stars in Their Courses ... about the Gettysburg Campaign.

IMO that was a great business decision on Shelby's part.

All he had to do was edit what he had written decades before, ... repackage ... and sell to a new audience.



 
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Pete Longstreet

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It was based upon the quality of this novel, that Random House selected Mr. Foote to write a "short" civil war history! Which as we all know, became the acclaimed three volume The Civil War: A Narrative.



I would agree. It is an enjoyable read and certainly worth a try.

Cheers
Foote quickly learned that he wouldn't be interested in writing a "summary" of the Civil War... He then took the next 20 years and wrote a masterpiece!
 

Pete Longstreet

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The Beleagured City: The Vicksburg Campaign, is another another good quick read.

Before his death, Foote was with the Modern Library publishing company.

He wrote nothing new, but did select enough parts of his narrative to create a very good "Cliff Notes" version of his own famous narrative about specific campaigns.

He did the same with Stars in Their Courses ... about the Gettysburg Campaign.

IMO that was a good business decision on Shelby's part.

All he had to do was edit what he had written decades before, ... repackage ... and sell to a new audience.



I have both Stars In Their Courses and The Beleaguered City on cassette, read by Foote himself. I then converted it to MP4 and saved it to my computer so I'll always have it. Yea... I'm a fan of Shelby Foote lol.
 

DixieRifles

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This book is based on the Battle of Shiloh. Foote uses actual events, but implements his own fictional characters, thus describing their viewpoints and experiences throughout the battle.
I gave away my copy last month. When I read a fiction, I get a story in my head and have a hard time distinguishing was that true or not.
 

Pete Longstreet

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I gave away my copy last month. When I read a fiction, I get a story in my head and have a hard time distinguishing was that true or not.
I usually never read fiction. But from what I understand, Foote used actual events, quotes, etc. For example, if Albert Sidney Johnston did or said something, it was factual. He just placed his fictional characters into the Battle to fight along Johnston (or whomever). But the events or specific details about Shiloh are all true, and based on fact.
 
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I usually never read fiction.
If done properly, historical fiction is one of my favorite genres.

Is this the novel where a dog is a character. Short, easy read?
I don't recall a dog as a character, but it was an easy read.


But from what I understand, Foote used actual events, quotes, etc. For example, if Albert Sidney Johnston did or said something, it was factual. He just placed his fictional characters into the Battle to fight along Johnston (or whomever). But the events or specific details about Shiloh are all true, and based on fact.
Very true.

One example :

Foote perfectly captured the frustration and anger of the common soldiers seeking shelter from the rain the night before they had to
march through mud & muck on the way to Shiloh from Corinth.

And then watching the Generals ride to the front in carriages, while dressed in their fine uniforms.
From what I remember, the foot soldiers were really pizzed at the fancy peacock ... AKA General Beauregard.

:smoke:

1630554607680.gif
 
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Time for a quick Shelby Foote video

"Google" said he speaks of Shiloh.
He does not.

He talks about Mississippi literary heritage in the towns of Greenville, Clarksdale and Greenwood.
And the initial Civil War actions in Natchez & Vicksburg.


Although no Shiloh commentary in the clip, very few old timers still speak with that accent.
There are still a few with us, but we're loosing them every day.

:frown:
 

Vicksburger

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Here is a picture I found by accident. It is a young Shelby Foote and James Jones(1921-1977), novelist, author of From Here to Eternity (1951) and other books. The picture was found at the Univ. of Mississippi website with the caption: "Shelby Foote and James Jones at the Keatings' home in Greenville, MS." Intriguing to me since Jones is from my hometown. In Some Came Running (1958) he has an extensive scene where the main character (from Illinois) takes a trip through the South and N.B. Forrest was discussed.
Does anyone know the date or the occasion?
James Jones and Shelby Foote.jpg
 

BillWright

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Jul 15, 2021
The Beleagured City: The Vicksburg Campaign, is another another good quick read.

Before his death, Foote was with the Modern Library publishing company.

He wrote nothing new, but did select enough parts of his narrative to create a very good "Cliff Notes" version of his own famous work.

He did the same with Stars in Their Courses ... about the Gettysburg Campaign.

IMO that was a great business decision on Shelby's part.

All he had to do was edit what he had written decades before, ... repackage ... and sell to a new audience.



 
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