Sharecropping comparable to slavery?

DanSBHawk

Captain
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
And I have repeatedly noted Sharecropping and Tenant farming are not the same.

Again this OP is "was sharecropping comparable with slavery" has nothing to do with some false blame game. Not seeing where the majority of your posts have had anything to do with whether you feel they are comparable or not.
I've never said that Sharecropping and Tenant farming is the same. And I think that attempting to make an issue of the differences between the two terms in this thread is unhelpful and intended to be distracting.

As to the OP, and whether sharecropping is comparable to slavery. In truth there is only one group of people that can answer that question... those who have been both slave and sharecropper.

I think that if someone wants to make sharecropping seem no better than slavery, then they should find examples of black sharecroppers during Reconstruction who yearned to be enslaved again.
 
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Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Location
mo
I've never said that Sharecropping and Tenant farming is the same. And I think that attempting to make an issue of the differences between the two terms in this thread is unhelpful and intended to be distracting.

As to the OP, and whether sharecropping is comparable to slavery. In truth there is only one group of people that can answer that question... those who have been both slave and sharecropper.

I think that if someone wants to make sharecropping seem no better than slavery, then they should find examples of black sharecroppers during Reconstruction who yearned to be enslaved again.
Actually as the thread was about sharecropping which involves a lack of capital......it would seem to me that attempting to expand it somehow to tenant farming which suggests one does have capital seems disingenuous.

It was rather simple question based on on over the years I have seen more then once the comparison that sharecropping was an extension of slavery, honestly never have seen such a claim about tenant farming.

It certainly does seem to me having capital, or ones own horses/mules/ equipment/ ECT would impart a degree of freedom/choices/ or opportunity over one who doesn't. Why the OP is sharecropping
 
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DanSBHawk

Captain
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
Actually as the thread was about sharecropping which involves a lack of capital......it would seem to me that attempting to expand it somehow to tenant farming which suggests one does have capital seems disingenuous.

It was rather simple question based on on over the years I have seen more then once the comparison that sharecropping was an extension of slavery, honestly never have seen such a claim about tenant farming.

It certainly does seem to me having capital, or ones own horses/mules/ equipment/ ECT would impart a degree of freedom/choices/ or opportunity over one who doesn't. Why the OP is sharecropping
"Attempting to expand it somehow to tenant farming"?

That happened in the second post of the thread, and you had no problem with it.
 
Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Location
mo
"Attempting to expand it somehow to tenant farming"?

That happened in the second post of the thread, and you had no problem with it.
Have no idea how you think I had no problem with it, as I haven't addressed it at all as far as the OP other then stressing it is not the same as sharecropping.........
 

Tom Hughes

First Sergeant
Joined
May 27, 2019
Location
Mississippi
I have seen remarks such as it was just a continuation of slavery.

Recently a modern figure compared poor whites to slavery, not exactly in the context I'll ask. We wont go to who, but try to stay on what I ask which somewhat stems from his remarks.

But there were numerous poor white sharecroppers well into the 1900's. If a comparison of sharecropping to slavery is accurate or appropriate, would it be fair to likewise compare poor white sharecroppers to slaves or slavery? Wouldn't they be in effect held in place in social and economic status as much as any other sharecroppers? Because to some degree, ones social status is seldom seperate from ones economic status, why their were terms such as "cracker"
My father in law's father made $240 a year sharecropping and moving was not an option. Too poor. If that ain't slavery, then I don't know what is.
 

ForeverFree

Major
Joined
Feb 6, 2010
Location
District of Columbia
My father in law's father made $240 a year sharecropping and moving was not an option. Too poor. If that ain't slavery, then I don't know what is.

Was your father in law's father ever put on an auction block?

Slave-Auction-in-Virginia--600x312.jpg


This is slavery.

Note further that overwhelmingly slaves were not paid, although small number (such as urban slaves) did receive some kind of recompense.

All slavery is exploited labor. But not all exploited labor is slavery.

- Alan
 

Tom Hughes

First Sergeant
Joined
May 27, 2019
Location
Mississippi
Was your father in law's father ever put on an auction block?

View attachment 350900

This is slavery.

Note further that overwhelmingly slaves were not paid, although small number (such as urban slaves) did receive some kind of recompense.

All slavery is exploited labor. But not all exploited labor is slavery.

- Alan
Why of course not. He was white and it was in the 1930s.
The point I was making was that whites and blacks were suffering poverty together and enduring many economic hardships after the civil war had ended and that extended into the 20th century.
 

ForeverFree

Major
Joined
Feb 6, 2010
Location
District of Columbia
Why of course not. He was white and it was in the 1930s.
The point I was making was that whites and blacks were suffering poverty together and enduring many economic hardships after the civil war had ended and that extended into the 20th century.

To be honest, I didn't get that from your post. You made that point "My father in law's father made $240 a year sharecropping and moving was not an option. Too poor. If that ain't slavery, then I don't know what is." Thing is, that wasn't slavery.

But I do agree that many people, both black and white, suffered poverty and economic hardship for long periods in American history.

- Alan
 
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