Miniatures Share Your Non-Civil War Miniatures Here!

CivilWarTalk

Lieutenant General
- ★★★ -
Managing Member & Webmaster
Joined
Apr 1, 1999
Location
Martinsburg, WV
This Thread is here specifically as a place to post any photos of Non-Civil War Miniatures, either your work, or your photos of amazing work you think is worthy of showing off to others!

Please don't post Non-Civil War Miniatures photos anywhere but this thread!

Please don't post any Civil War Era Miniatures in this thread! If you see that someone has mistakenly done this, please report it and we will probably move it out and turn it into it's own thread so it can be featured on the forum and shared properly!

Thanks!
 

Kurt G

Sergeant Major
Joined
May 23, 2018
This is an old figure from Series 77. 1980s vintage and made out of white metal . It's called "The Gambler" and has the typical Series 77 features ; Legs that are a bit too short and that unique face and nose .

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Booner

2nd Lieutenant
Forum Host
Joined
May 4, 2015
Location
Boonville, MO.
Really nice work Kurt! And I agree with Rebel Brit that your flesh tones are always first rate.

I have a soft spot for the Series 77 line of figures. I remember quite a few, and I think the first figure I painted was a Series 77, a Northern private holding a cup of coffee. I seem to remember that the company gave him the name of something like "Sven Jorgensen" or something like that. With a Scandinavian name I had to paint his eyes blue and hair blond. I think I still have a couple of Series 77 figures in my "to paint'' box somewhere.
 

Kurt G

Sergeant Major
Joined
May 23, 2018
Really nice work Kurt! And I agree with Rebel Brit that your flesh tones are always first rate.

I have a soft spot for the Series 77 line of figures. I remember quite a few, and I think the first figure I painted was a Series 77, a Northern private holding a cup of coffee. I seem to remember that the company gave him the name of something like "Sven Jorgensen" or something like that. With a Scandinavian name I had to paint his eyes blue and hair blond. I think I still have a couple of Series 77 figures in my "to paint'' box somewhere.
I remember the Union private . I never got that one , but I think it was a very nice figure . I have the Roger's Rangers figure , but I started repainting it . Also have the Garibaldi Guard ( 39th NY) because my GGGrandfather was in the 39th . I am in the process of moving over the next month or so. It will be awhile before I do any new projects.
 

Booner

2nd Lieutenant
Forum Host
Joined
May 4, 2015
Location
Boonville, MO.
I remember the Union private . I never got that one , but I think it was a very nice figure . I have the Roger's Rangers figure , but I started repainting it . Also have the Garibaldi Guard ( 39th NY) because my GGGrandfather was in the 39th . I am in the process of moving over the next month or so. It will be awhile before I do any new projects.
I remember those two, I painted the Rogers Ranger. My all time favorite Series 77 figure was their mountain man. I spent a week painting all the beading he had in a geometric design.
And I do remember their figures were kind of stocky, or as my wife would have said, they were "short waisted."
 

Kurt G

Sergeant Major
Joined
May 23, 2018
I remember those two, I painted the Rogers Ranger. My all time favorite Series 77 figure was their mountain man. I spent a week painting all the beading he had in a geometric design.
And I do remember their figures were kind of stocky, or as my wife would have said, they were "short waisted."
Shepard Paine had an article in one of his books about cutting the legs , adding brass rod extensions and resculpting the gap with putty.
 

DixieRifles

Captain
Member of the Year
Regtl. Staff Shiloh 2020
Joined
Mar 22, 2009
Location
Collierville, TN
nspired by a scene in the movie “Battle of Britian”, I used an extra airplane kit figure and created a freight dolly to build this scene. I didnt know the German translation.
(1-1/2 inch tall figure. Maybe 1/48 scale)

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I was going thru my stack of old magazines. I kept an issue of “Air Classics” that covered the details of the 1970 movie “Battle of Britain”. There were several great photos of airplanes and such. One full page photo was the inspiration for my figure.

44351B51-CBA9-4352-BF25-A6D3BBB3E745.jpeg

How close did I copy it?

One little bit of info found in the details of the magazine. The movie obtained a post-war Spanish version of the German Messerschmidt. The noticeable difference is the engine and a 4-bladed propellor. The Germans mounted their engine inverted; the exhausts on the bottom. Whereas the Spanish version has the exhaust up high on the cowling.
When they filmed scenes with this airplane in a static position, they removed the 4-bladed prop and installed a historically accurate 3-bladed prop. In the flying scenes, it is quite easy to count spinning propellors: 4.
 

Kurt G

Sergeant Major
Joined
May 23, 2018
I was going thru my stack of old magazines. I kept an issue of “Air Classics” that covered the details of the 1970 movie “Battle of Britain”. There were several great photos of airplanes and such. One full page photo was the inspiration for my figure.

View attachment 411374
How close did I copy it?

One little bit of info found in the details of the magazine. The movie obtained a post-war Spanish version of the German Messerschmidt. The noticeable difference is the engine and a 4-bladed propellor. The Germans mounted their engine inverted; the exhausts on the bottom. Whereas the Spanish version has the exhaust up high on the cowling.
When they filmed scenes with this airplane in a static position, they removed the 4-bladed prop and installed a historically accurate 3-bladed prop. In the flying scenes, it is quite easy to count spinning propellors: 4.
Not bad for a movie of that era . The tanks in such movies as Patton were terrible. They also used what I believe were Spanish licensed He-111s in Patton which had different engines than their German counterparts . Still , the He-111s looked good in Patton.
 

Lincoln56

Corporal
Joined
Jul 24, 2016
Location
Texas
Not bad for a movie of that era . The tanks in such movies as Patton were terrible. They also used what I believe were Spanish licensed He-111s in Patton which had different engines than their German counterparts . Still , the He-111s looked good in Patton.
Those were Spanish HE-111's. Tanks have been problematic in movies - 'Kelly's Heroes' (1970) used modified Soviet T-34's as German; 'Battle of the Bulge (1965) used the M47 Patton as German; 'A Bridge Too Far' (1977) used disguised German Leopard I tanks which came into service in 1965. Only four actual Sherman tanks appear in the film. The rest were plastic molds set on top of a VW Beetle chassis.

Nice to see an actual German Tiger 131 borrowed from a English museum in 'Fury'.
 

DixieRifles

Captain
Member of the Year
Regtl. Staff Shiloh 2020
Joined
Mar 22, 2009
Location
Collierville, TN
Nice to see an actual German Tiger 131 borrowed from a English museum in 'Fury'.
“Fury” was great to watch—-once. I thought Hollywood turned it into a fiction and almost a comedy.
I really had problems with the scene of two tanks battling it out bumper-to-bumper.

But— I was wrong.
One of my friends had a father in the 752d Tank Battalion which supported the 88th Infantry Division and my Dad’s 85th Infantry Division in Northern Italy. His father was a tank commander and he got into a one-on-one battle with a Hetman tank— & Im almost sure it was a Tiger. He hit with a shot from 25 Yards! Of course there was one difference: it was not in an open field but in a small town with obstacles such as trees etc.
You might find this story on his website: http://www.752tank.com/
He has researched every soldier in the battalion and documented many battles with maps and current photos of existing buildings.

But still not my favorite movie.

{Edited} Here is link to the story of the battle with Tiger 221. Link: http://www.752tank.com/cecina.html
 
Last edited:

Lincoln56

Corporal
Joined
Jul 24, 2016
Location
Texas
“Fury” was great to watch—-once. I thought Hollywood turned it into a fiction and almost a comedy.
I really had problems with the scene of two tanks battling it out bumper-to-bumper.

But— I was wrong.
One of my friends had a father in the 752d Tank Battalion which supported the 88th Infantry Division and my Dad’s 85th Infantry Division in Northern Italy. His father was a tank commander and he got into a one-on-one battle with a Hetman tank— & Im almost sure it was a Tiger. He hit with a shot from 25 Yards! Of course there was one difference: it was not in an open field but in a small town with obstacles such as trees etc.
You might find this story on his website: http://www.752tank.com/
He has researched every soldier in the battalion and documented many battles with maps and current photos of existing buildings.

But still not my favorite movie.
Thanks for the link!

Felt the same watching the two tanks scene.

As often is the case Hollywood played loose with detail. However, appreciative of the effort regarding the German Tiger, well worn uniforms and equipage, and the complete exhaustion of the men etc... as opposed to what is normally served up. As well as a willingness to convey the visceral portrayal of effects, similar to those in the 'Saving Private Ryan' Normandy assault, which have been rightly or wrongly avoided by so many other movies. As William T. Sherman said, "War is cruel".
 

Kurt G

Sergeant Major
Joined
May 23, 2018
Those were Spanish HE-111's. Tanks have been problematic in movies - 'Kelly's Heroes' (1970) used modified Soviet T-34's as German; 'Battle of the Bulge (1965) used the M47 Patton as German; 'A Bridge Too Far' (1977) used disguised German Leopard I tanks which came into service in 1965. Only four actual Sherman tanks appear in the film. The rest were plastic molds set on top of a VW Beetle chassis.

Nice to see an actual German Tiger 131 borrowed from a English museum in 'Fury'.
That Frankenstein Leopard must be the worst of the lot .
 

rebel brit

1st Lieutenant
Forum Host
Joined
Feb 7, 2013
Location
United Kingdom
Native American Indian
Inuit with baby.jpg

I thought the above picture of an Inuit woman with baby would make an interesting subject for a 1/10th bust.
I scratch-built the following way back in 2010.

I started by sculpting the head and face in Super sculpey firm clay, not that I particularly needed to achieve a good likeness but I was pleased with the result.
The next step was to build the body and the papoose.

Inuit with baby 1.JPG
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Inuit with baby 3.JPG
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Then by adding more clay I built up the fur/seal skin collar.


Inuit with baby 5.JPG
Inuit with baby 6.JPG
Inuit with baby 7.JPG


Finally to finish the Bust, my first attempt at sculpting a baby's head, luckily no arms or legs to add.

Inuit with baby 8.JPG
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Inuit with baby 10.JPG
 
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