Miniatures Share Your Non-Civil War Miniatures Here!

CivilWarTalk

Lieutenant General
- ★★★ -
Managing Member & Webmaster
Joined
Apr 1, 1999
Location
Martinsburg, WV
This Thread is here specifically as a place to post any photos of Non-Civil War Miniatures, either your work, or your photos of amazing work you think is worthy of showing off to others!

Please don't post Non-Civil War Miniatures photos anywhere but this thread!

Please don't post any Civil War Era Miniatures in this thread! If you see that someone has mistakenly done this, please report it and we will probably move it out and turn it into it's own thread so it can be featured on the forum and shared properly!

Thanks!
 

James N.

Colonel
Forum Host
Annual Winner
Featured Book Reviewer
Asst. Regtl. Quartermaster Antietam 2021
Joined
Feb 23, 2013
Location
East Texas
027.JPG

Oh! I'm getting off the subject of Civil War.
I collected some Britians Civil War figures from National Parks that I've visited.
View attachment 328153
confederate-officer-jpg.jpg
I too have that fellow, purchased at one of the Battlefield Parks. Since I lack both the eyesight and patience to paint myself anymore I've accumulated quite a few of these, assembling them into smallish diorama groupings, some of which I've also posted before but will repeat here. My latest - since getting these Confederates from various sets - have been the individual Irish Brigade at Fredericksburg figures based on the Don Troiani painting of the same, but I haven't taken any photos of them as yet. Ditto for some other single portrait figures of Stonewall Jackson, Jed Hotchkiss, Henry Kyd Douglas, Joshua Chamberlain, and Joe Hooker.

DSC01787.JPG
 
Last edited:

Booner

2nd Lieutenant
Forum Host
Joined
May 4, 2015
Location
Boonville, MO.
Well, you also have to realize that NOT all the soldiers wore their "dress uniforms" into the field. They switched to pants instead of high buttoned gaiters. Even in the American Revolution, the British highlanders switched to plaid pants instead of kilts. Their plums came off and their hat was covered with an oil-cloth.
When you are selecting a figure to paint, you should consider how the soldier looked in the field. I don't collect the classic "toy soldiers" typical of Britains figures. They just look took shiny and no realism. When I wanted to paint a Napoleonic War figure, I would go to some reference books with old paintings of the battles.

View attachment 328210

You bring up a good point about reference books. I thought I might start a thread next week about that very topic. I thought that since this is a new forum, I'd let this post run it's course before I added anything new, you know, like let it gain some traction before it branches out. I started this post about 24 hours ago, and we're now well into our third page, so I thank everyone who's contributed, and/or just looked at it. It shows we have some interest in the topic, which I guess shouldn't surprise me. Collecting and painting miniature is a solitary hobby, and I often think that I'm the only one who does it. But with the reply's to the post it shows that there's more interest in our quiet little hobby than most would think.

Again, thanks to all that have contributed to the thread.

Now post more pictures!
 

rebelatsea

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Mar 30, 2013
Location
Kent ,England.
Well, you also have to realize that NOT all the soldiers wore their "dress uniforms" into the field. They switched to pants instead of high buttoned gaiters. Even in the American Revolution, the British highlanders switched to plaid pants instead of kilts. Their plums came off and their hat was covered with an oil-cloth.
When you are selecting a figure to paint, you should consider how the soldier looked in the field. I don't collect the classic "toy soldiers" typical of Britains figures. They just look took shiny and no realism. When I wanted to paint a Napoleonic War figure, I would go to some reference books with old paintings of the battles.

View attachment 328210
Napoleon's "Old Guard" were specially selected to be 6ft and over, without headgear. Their uniform was designed to make them imposing and to be feared. Unfortunately at Waterloo it backfired, it was said that the Allies killed all the big Frenchmen and a nation of runts for a century was the result ! Victorious propaganda aside, killing so many large males must have had some effect in the succeeding generations.
 

DixieRifles

Captain
Member of the Year
Regtl. Staff Shiloh 2020
Joined
Mar 22, 2009
Location
Collierville, TN
Napoleon's "Old Guard" were specially selected to be 6ft and over, without headgear. Their uniform was designed to make them imposing and to be feared. Unfortunately at Waterloo it backfired, it was said that the Allies killed all the big Frenchmen and a nation of runts for a century was the result ! Victorious propaganda aside, killing so many large males must have had some effect in the succeeding generations.

Here is another example of uniforms seen in the field.

The 3rd Regiment of the Imperial Guards were Dutch and wore a white uniform. During one of the earlier battles, they were wearing their everyday bicorne hat. While they were moving to a battle, they were ordered to move quickly to relieve a unit. As they were crossing a bridge, they were ordered to remove their bicorne hats and put on their bearskin hats. They were in a rush so they simply tossed their bicorne hats into the river. From that day forth, they only wore the bearskin hats at all times.
3rdGrenadiers.JPG
 

JPChurch

First Sergeant
Joined
Dec 30, 2016
Location
Manassas VA
That's pretty neat-o from Band Of Brothers?? Why not Sgt. Saunders from "Combat!" Or even Kirby, Cage, Little John and Doc??
 

James N.

Colonel
Forum Host
Annual Winner
Featured Book Reviewer
Asst. Regtl. Quartermaster Antietam 2021
Joined
Feb 23, 2013
Location
East Texas
Napoleon's "Old Guard" were specially selected to be 6ft and over, without headgear. Their uniform was designed to make them imposing and to be feared. Unfortunately at Waterloo it backfired, it was said that the Allies killed all the big Frenchmen and a nation of runts for a century was the result ! Victorious propaganda aside, killing so many large males must have had some effect in the succeeding generations.
NOT TRUE - a "popular" myth based on the requirements for grenadiers in other countries, like Frederick's famous Potsdam Grenadiers. One of the most interesting memoires I've ever read is The Notebooks of Captain Coignet (Les Cahiers du Capitaine Coignet in the original French; I read it in translation.) Coignet was originally a private soldier in the Consular Guard who attained his final rank by Waterloo as a staff officer. He describes how Marshal Davout (who held the honorary position of Colonel-in-Chief of the Guard Grenadiers) gave him a pack of playing cards to put in his stockings in order to make him tall enough when he went for his examination, which as I remember was only 5'2" or thereabouts. By the ruse he passed, though he was possibly the shortest of the Guard Grenadiers. He served for many years as a mere corporal because he was illiterate; finally Marshal Mortier commanding the infantry of the Imperial Guard ORDERED him to learn to read and assigned four young men recently admitted to the Guard to teach him! As an officer he was enabled to join the Imperial Headquarters.
 

James N.

Colonel
Forum Host
Annual Winner
Featured Book Reviewer
Asst. Regtl. Quartermaster Antietam 2021
Joined
Feb 23, 2013
Location
East Texas
Napoleon's "Old Guard" were specially selected to be 6ft and over, without headgear. Their uniform was designed to make them imposing and to be feared. Unfortunately at Waterloo it backfired, it was said that the Allies killed all the big Frenchmen and a nation of runts for a century was the result ! Victorious propaganda aside, killing so many large males must have had some effect in the succeeding generations.
This is another exaggeration I'd also like to address, mainly because it took me a while to realize what had actually happened to give rise to stories like this. The Imperial Guard, as @DixieRifles has indicated above, consisted of many regiments of infantry and cavalry and batteries of foot and horse artillery and was designated by their length of service into Old, Middle, and Young Guard. (As has been seen, in the French Guard size had nothing to do with it!) At Waterloo there were three divisions of Guard infantry: Grenadiers, Chasseurs, and Young Guard; in the grenadiers and chasseurs were regiments of both Old and Middle Guard. Napoleon invariably withheld the Old Guard regiments, largely for political reasons because these were his oldest and therefore staunchest supporters. There was virtually no difference in the uniform between Old and Middle Guardsmen, and when the battalions of Middle Guard failed in the final attack of the day and began to retreat, the rest of the army thought it was the fabled Old Guard which had done so, and the cries went up "La Garde recule!" and "Suave qui peut!" (The Guard retreats - save yourselves!) It was the Old Guard regiments that formed square and served as rearguard for the now-fleeing French army and their losses were indeed felt in the army, but especially politically.
 

DixieRifles

Captain
Member of the Year
Regtl. Staff Shiloh 2020
Joined
Mar 22, 2009
Location
Collierville, TN
Here is my collection of Civil War Britains figures. I bought most of these at a National Park---Chattanooga's Lookout Mountain, Vicksburg(150th Anniversary of Surrender), maybe Shiloh. Some were bought from my dealer friend.

0BritainsCW-01.JPG

BritainsCW-01.JPG


Here is a figure that I painted years ago. I picked this up at a shop---this may have been when I lived in Texas and I had to drive through a lot of traffic to visit a shop in Dallas(in 1980's).
Figure is a 54mm of the the Zastrow Cuirassier of the Kingdom of Saxony. They fought and distinguished themselves at the Battle of Borodino. I remember that much but I frankly can't recall which side they fought on.
The figure came in only 2 or 3 parts: base, body and head. So not a lot of detail but I liked the pose and the cape.
At the time, I painted my bases with just dirt but I would add in some twigs of grass made from rope and painted.
I bought the base and made the brass sign with rub-on letters. Later I would use the rub-on letters and dip the brass into acid that would etch out the background and leave the letters----that is how it was supposed to work in theory.
The base is okay for viewing but the sloped sides makes it hard to pick up.

Saxon-01.JPG

Saxon-02.JPG


{Edited}
Saxon-000.JPG

Wiki article...
On 15 February 1812 the army was mobilized for the upcoming French invasion of Russia. The Saxon contingent was formed as the 21st and 22nd Division of the VII Army Corps of Grande Armée under the command of the French General of Division Jean Reynier. The Saxons fielded 18 infantry battalions, 28 Cavalry squadrons, 56 (six and four-pounder) guns, together 200 men and 7,000 horses.
 
Last edited:

Kurt G

Sergeant Major
Joined
May 23, 2018
A couple more.
1.Iron Brigade by Fer . 75mm or about 1/24 scale . Can anyone identify a possible error in the sculpting ?
2. WW1 German Stormtrooper by Young . 200mm bust , which means if the figure were full bodied it would be approximately 200mm tall.
Both were done primarily in acrylics with some oils .

IMG_2640.JPG


IMG_2658.JPG
 

Booner

2nd Lieutenant
Forum Host
Joined
May 4, 2015
Location
Boonville, MO.
A couple more.
1.Iron Brigade by Fer . 75mm or about 1/24 scale . Can anyone identify a possible error in the sculpting ?

I'll bite. The hat. I think the brim of the hat (Hardee?), was supposed to be turned up on the other (left) side?
However, if I tried to shoot the musket with that hat turned up like it think it supposed to be, I'd knock the hat off my head, so I can see why the sculptor turned the brim up on the right side. If I'm correct, why was the brim turned up on the left?

BTW, you skin tones are exceptional.
 
Last edited:

DixieRifles

Captain
Member of the Year
Regtl. Staff Shiloh 2020
Joined
Mar 22, 2009
Location
Collierville, TN
1.Iron Brigade by Fer . 75mm or about 1/24 scale . Can anyone identify a possible error in the sculpting ?
1. The stripes seem very low.
2. I was going to say the front badge was wrong. Instead I will say the wrong side of the hat is pinned up.
 

Kurt G

Sergeant Major
Joined
May 23, 2018
I'll bite. The hat. I think the brim of the hat (Hardee?), was supposed to be turned up on the other (left) side?
However, if I tried to shoot the musket with that hat turned up like it think it supposed to be, I'd knock the hat off my head, so I can see why the sculptor turned the brim up on the right side. If I'm correct, why was the brim turned up on the left?

BTW, you skin tones are exceptional.
You are right ! Also the figure had buttons on the collar for some reason , but they were easily removed with a hobby knife . Fer is a very good company , but every maker will make a mistake .
 

Kurt G

Sergeant Major
Joined
May 23, 2018
1. The stripes seem very low.
2. I was going to say the front badge was wrong. Instead I will say the wrong side of the hat is pinned up.
You are probably right about the stripes , but the main issue is the hat is pinned up on the wrong side .
 

Kurt G

Sergeant Major
Joined
May 23, 2018
I'll bite. The hat. I think the brim of the hat (Hardee?), was supposed to be turned up on the other (left) side?
However, if I tried to shoot the musket with that hat turned up like it think it supposed to be, I'd knock the hat off my head, so I can see why the sculptor turned the brim up on the right side. If I'm correct, why was the brim turned up on the left?

BTW, you skin tones are exceptional.
regulations were pinned on the right for cavalry and artillery and pinned on the left for infantry , but I don't know why .
 

James N.

Colonel
Forum Host
Annual Winner
Featured Book Reviewer
Asst. Regtl. Quartermaster Antietam 2021
Joined
Feb 23, 2013
Location
East Texas
regulations were pinned on the right for cavalry and artillery and pinned on the left for infantry , but I don't know why .
Simple - to accommodate the positions of carry for cavalry sabers and support arms for infantrymen. (Mounted artillerymen were supposed to wear a brimless shako.)
 
Joined
Sep 28, 2013
Location
Southwest Mississippi
or just purchase them, or you saw one that you found interesting, etc., please post a picture here.

Great thread !

Although I'm not a "collector," I do have more than a few miniatures.
Most are in storage (original boxes included) and I rotate the figures throughought the year.

Although it's not the St. Petersburg collection, I've been impressed with many of the King & Country products.
Currently I have their Lord Nelson on my desk.

He's wearing his working Admiral's uniform, while on shore.

0-1 (1).jpg


It's a great little representation of Nelson.

I only wish his eye patch was not "turned up".
 
Last edited:

Waterloo50

Major
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Joined
Jul 7, 2015
Location
England
Great thread !

Although I'm not a "collector," I do have more than a few miniatures.
Most are in storage (original boxes included) and I rotate the figures throughought the year.

Although it's not the St. Petersburg collection, I've been impressed with many of the King & Country products.
Currently I have thier Lord Nelson on my desk.

He's wearing his working Admiral's uniform, while on shore.

View attachment 328893

It's a great little representation of Nelson.

I only wish his eye patch was not "turned up".
You know, it’s a bit of a myth, Nelson never wore an eye patch.
 
Top