Miniatures Share Your Non-Civil War Miniatures Here!

CivilWarTalk

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This Thread is here specifically as a place to post any photos of Non-Civil War Miniatures, either your work, or your photos of amazing work you think is worthy of showing off to others!

Please don't post Non-Civil War Miniatures photos anywhere but this thread!

Please don't post any Civil War Era Miniatures in this thread! If you see that someone has mistakenly done this, please report it and we will probably move it out and turn it into it's own thread so it can be featured on the forum and shared properly!

Thanks!
 

rebel brit

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United Kingdom
Roza Shanina
WWII Russian Female Sniper Roza Shanina 1924 - 1945 killed at the age of 20 after having had 59 confirmed kills.
https://rarehistoricalphotos.com/roza-shanina-1945/

This is the final Russian figure and one that I completed in 2011.
Made using Magic-Sculpt and Super Sculpey Firm in a 1/16th scale /120mm size. (just under 5 inches high).

Started off by making a wire armature and filling it out using Magic-Sculpt.
I decided to cast it in 3 pieces (head, body & rifle) but wasn't entirely happy with the likeness, so decided to re-do the head.

roza12.jpg
roza13.JPG
roza2.JPG


After completing the boots in Magic-Sculpt I used Super Sculpey Firm clay to construct the body.
Unlike Magic-Sculpt which is a putty that hardens within approx 1 hour, the Super Sculpey Clay enables you to work on the figure indefinitely before baking.

roza6.JPG
roza4.JPG
roza5.JPG


Struggled with making such a small scale weapon so I 'persuaded' a friend to build it for me, just leaving me to sculpt the hands onto the rifle.
The finished figure.
roza11.JPG
roza7.JPG
roza8.JPG


After completing this figure I became addicted to sculpting Flat figures and decided to do another Roza Shanina this time as a Flat.
Measures approx 3 inch x 2 inch and this one I did get round to painting.
Roza Shanina 16.jpg
Roza Shanina 15.jpg

My next post will of a WWII American Nurse, so stay tuned.
 

Kurt G

Sergeant Major
Joined
May 23, 2018
Roza Shanina
WWII Russian Female Sniper Roza Shanina 1924 - 1945 killed at the age of 20 after having had 59 confirmed kills.
https://rarehistoricalphotos.com/roza-shanina-1945/

This is the final Russian figure and one that I completed in 2011.
Made using Magic-Sculpt and Super Sculpey Firm in a 1/16th scale /120mm size. (just under 5 inches high).

Started off by making a wire armature and filling it out using Magic-Sculpt.
I decided to cast it in 3 pieces (head, body & rifle) but wasn't entirely happy with the likeness, so decided to re-do the head.

View attachment 404087 View attachment 404088 View attachment 404089

After completing the boots in Magic-Sculpt I used Super Sculpey Firm clay to construct the body.
Unlike Magic-Sculpt which is a putty that hardens within approx 1 hour, the Super Sculpey Clay enables you to work on the figure indefinitely before baking.

View attachment 404094 View attachment 404096 View attachment 404098

Struggled with making such a small scale weapon so I 'persuaded' a friend to build it for me, just leaving me to sculpt the hands onto the rifle.
The finished figure.
View attachment 404126 View attachment 404131 View attachment 404128

After completing this figure I became addicted to sculpting Flat figures and decided to do another Roza Shanina this time as a Flat.
Measures approx 3 inch x 2 inch and this one I did get round to painting.
View attachment 404143 View attachment 404144
My next post will of a WWII American Nurse, so stay tuned.
Those are both great pieces . Did you ever try to have the full figure pieces made for sale ? They are as good as any out there .
 

rebel brit

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Those are both great pieces . Did you ever try to have the full figure pieces made for sale ? They are as good as any out there .
A few years ago I had a website mainly for Figures, busts etc but now I concentrate more on the website I have for Flat figures that I can cast myself.
So in answer to your question , "yes" and pleased to say I sold quite a few.
 

rebel brit

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Location
United Kingdom
Angel of Bataan

Her name is Mae Beulah 'Peggy' Greenwalt a WW2 U.S Army nurse serving in the Pacific. At the fall of Corregidor she courageously saved the colours of the 12th Regimental Quartermaster Corps by wrapping the colours around her and convincing her Japanese captors that it was a shawl. After being held as a POW for the next 33 months until 1945 Lt Greenwalt upon release presented the flag to the commander of the 12th QM regiment.

Both recognized the deed for what it was - a clear demonstration of Honor.

I was sent some pictures and commissioned to sculpt a 1/10th scale bust of a nurse representing Mae Beulah 'Peggy' Greenwalt.
I made the face, head and 'Shawl' using Super Sculpey Firm clay .
Angel of Bataan 1.jpg
angel of battaan2.JPG


The blouse was made using Magic-Sculpt
Angel of Bataan3.jpg
Angel of Bataan4.jpg


At this point I decided to remove the bottom right folds as It didn't look symmetrical.
Once the shape was established I started on adding the tassels, these were made by twisting 2 wires together and cutting into short pieces .
Angel of Bataan5.JPG
Angel of Bataan6.JPG


In regards to the Flag motif you will see from the following pics that it was incorrect.

Angel of Bataan8.JPG
Angel of Bataan7.JPG


The picture of the Flag I was sent was in fact a reverse image of the Flag of the U.S Army Quartermaster Center.
The only way I realised this was when, in the area of Fort Lee VA I called at the Quartermaster Museum. I got chatting to a guy in the Museum and mentioned the sculpt I'd just finished, and that I was surprised there was no info or display on Bataan. He told me to continue looking round the Museum but to come back and see him when I was finished.
You can imagine my surprise when I walked into his office and there was the flag.
Apparently it was in the back having just been restored and waiting to go back on display. He was kind enough to set it up for me to take some photos.
So lucky I got talking to this guy, really made my day.
IMG_2349.JPG
IMG_2364.JPG
 
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Booner

2nd Lieutenant
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Location
Boonville, MO.
Wow, This might be your best female figure yet. Both the figure and the story are wonderful. You said you were commissioned to make the figure. What became of it?
 

Kurt G

Sergeant Major
Joined
May 23, 2018
Angel of Bataan

Her name is Mae Beulah 'Peggy' Greenwalt a WW2 U.S Army nurse serving in the Pacific. At the fall of Corregidor she courageously saved the colours of the 12th Regimental Quartermaster Corps by wrapping the colours around her and convincing her Japanese captors that it was a shawl. After being held as a POW for the next 33 months until 1945 Lt Greenwalt upon release presented the flag to the commander of the 12th QM regiment.

Both recognized the deed for what it was - a clear demonstration of Honor.

I was sent some pictures and commissioned to sculpt a 1/10th scale bust of a nurse representing Mae Beulah 'Peggy' Greenwalt.
I made the face, head and 'Shawl' using Super Sculpey Firm clay .
View attachment 405558 View attachment 405559

The blouse was made using Magic-Sculpt
View attachment 405561 View attachment 405562

At this point I decided to remove the bottom right folds as It didn't look symmetrical.
Once the shape was established I started on adding the tassels, these were made by twisting 2 wires together and cutting into short pieces .
View attachment 405563 View attachment 405564

In regards to the Flag motif you will see from the following pics that it was incorrect.

View attachment 405565 View attachment 405566

The picture of the Flag I was sent was in fact a reverse image of the Flag of the U.S Army Quartermaster Center.
The only way I realised this was when, in the area of Fort Lee VA I called at the Quartermaster Museum. I got chatting to a guy in the Museum and mentioned the sculpt I'd just finished, and that I was surprised there was no info or display on Bataan. He told me to continue looking round the Museum but to come back and see him when I was finished.
You can imagine my surprise when I walked into his office and there was the flag.
Apparently it was in the back having just been restored and waiting to go back on display. He was kind enough to set it up for me to take some photos.
So lucky I got talking to this guy, really made my day.
View attachment 405569 View attachment 405571
I had never heard of her before . That's a great story and a great sculpt .
 

DixieRifles

Captain
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Collierville, TN
The picture of the Flag I was sent was in fact a reverse image of the Flag of the U.S Army Quartermaster Center.
The only way I realised this was when, in the area of Fort Lee VA I called at the Quartermaster Museum. I got chatting to a guy in the Museum and mentioned the sculpt I'd just finished, and that I was surprised there was no info or display on Bataan. He told me to continue looking round the Museum but to come back and see him when I was finished.
You can imagine my surprise when I walked into his office and there was the flag.
Nice figure. Is she supposed to be wearing the QM Flag or some shawl that was embrodeired with it?

I visited Fort Lee VA back in the 1960's when my Air Force brother was stationed there. He took me through the QM museum.
That flag is a typical regiment/battalion flag that contains the Coat of Arms for a specific unit. The color of the flag would denote what type of unit. I am not familiar with QM units, but googling around I see that this Tan color seems to be the color used on their flags.
For example, here is a flag for a QM Regiment with a different coat of arms but same color. This flag has a wreath above the eagle with a QM insignia.

Flag--QM.JPG


The Coat of Arms was also made into a Distinguished Unit Insignia pin that was worn on the uniform and/or cap.
An example of a Post-WW2 DUI pin for 9th QM Battalion, which includes their motto.
DUI QM.JPG


The pattern you used does appear to be a reverse of the QM insignia used during WW2. This is from the collar brass worn by enlisted men.
Disc QM.JPG
 

rebel brit

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Location
United Kingdom
Nice figure. Is she supposed to be wearing the QM Flag or some shawl that was embrodeired with it?
The figure is shown wearing the QM flag, unfortunately not the correct motif. However it can be easily rectified by sanding off the incorrect details and painting freehand the correct motif.
The last pic above shows the actual flag of the 12th QM Regt as it should have been depicted.
Here's a close up.
IMG_2361.JPG
 

DixieRifles

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Collierville, TN
This is not a new figure. I think I posted a photo of this figure but it was probably a lousy photo taken back in 1980's.

I got the figure out of storage and had to re-assemble it. The horse broke off the base and the man and the saddle were off the horse. The reins broke off and his nice plum that I stylized is gone. This is what it looks like NOW after some repairs and reassembly and photos shot through a nicer camera.

5th Netherlands Dragoon -- 1815.
They fought as an ally with the British during the last battles against Napoleon. At Quatre Bras, they complained the British infantry shot at them because their uniforms were Green. There were present at Waterloo but I think they were hesitant about being near the Brits.
Back in 1990's, I had an interest in the French "Red Lancers" of the Imperial Guard. I posted a large clay figure that I painted earlier in this thread. In my research, I discovered the commander of the 5th Netherlands Dragoons had previously served with the French in the "Dutch" Red Lancers. I entered this is a small plastic modeling contest held in Memphis.

Uniform Source: A Wolfgang Tritt print from a calendar of mounted soldiers.
Kit: This is a plastic Historex kit that sets of arms and legs for the man and the horse. You could mix the horse body, legs and head for different stances. The Kit was originally a French troop called the Eclaireurs (circa 1813). The cap was a match but I converted the coat from 1 row of buttons to 2 rows. I worked hard to form some action in the figure. I made a tall plume that was twisted by the movement of his head---alas it is missing. I painted the horse with a base coat of light brown. I didn't like it and I tried to use thinner to remove the paint. The plastic in this Historex kit is delicate and it left a rough finish to the horse. I decided to paint it dappled grey which I think was the color in the calendar print. Afterwards, my sister-in-law artist recommended I always mix a Color with Black & White or else the grey will be boring. Make a note of that.
BTW, the paint job on his face is Frankenstein. I may have tried to re-paint it a few years later but it is really screwed up.

Netherlands_5-Dragoon--Rt-1.JPG

Netherlands_5-Dragoon--LF-2.JPG


Correction---the horses in the Historex kits came in 3 parts: Head and Left and Right body halves with legs attached. Im sure I had to cut and bend one or more of the legs on my 5th Dragoons. The coiled ribbon was included to make straps. I preferred cutting from plastic sheets.

BTW, I may have a couple of Historex kits that I need to sale. I think one has a horse with a base coat applied.
Kit historex.JPG
 
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Kurt G

Sergeant Major
Joined
May 23, 2018
I tried a few Historex back in the day , but I struggled with Napoleonics . That ribbon material was useless . You did a fine job on the figure . As Booner said , I really like the horse .
 

Booner

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Location
Boonville, MO.
I've never tried to paint a dapple gray. But I would think I'd paint the base layer and do my shading to that, then lay the gray on top?
 

DixieRifles

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But I would think I'd paint the base layer and do my shading to that, then lay the gray on top?
I had used oils for a few small figures and things like the face. It was easier to match flesh tones.
I know I decided to use the oil on the horse because I figured I would be painting in multiple layers. I dont remember the exact steps. I got pretty good painting horses with acrylic. I would lay down a dark base coat and then dry brush a very light color.

BTW I am nothing of an expert on horses or dapple greys.
 
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