Miniatures Share Your Non-Civil War Miniatures Here!

CivilWarTalk

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This Thread is here specifically as a place to post any photos of Non-Civil War Miniatures, either your work, or your photos of amazing work you think is worthy of showing off to others!

Please don't post Non-Civil War Miniatures photos anywhere but this thread!

Please don't post any Civil War Era Miniatures in this thread! If you see that someone has mistakenly done this, please report it and we will probably move it out and turn it into it's own thread so it can be featured on the forum and shared properly!

Thanks!
 

rebel brit

1st Lieutenant
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Feb 7, 2013
Location
United Kingdom
AMERICAN WW2 MEDIC.
Here's a step by step guide to show how I sculpted a 1/10th scale bust of a WW2 American Medic from a picture.
The challenge for me was I had never sculpted a dog or an American helmet before.
Made using a mixture of Magic-Sculpt and Duro epoxy putty.

us medic.jpg
IMG_1483.JPG


Once I was satisfied that I'd got a facial likeness I started on the body and the helmet.
One constructive critique I received was that the helmet in the picture below looked a bit too tall, which I was able to correct before finishing.
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The fourth component which was the dog was built with the Medic's hand attached.

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The finished result which measured approx 3 inched high.

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By the way this was one I made at least 10 years ago.
 

Kurt G

Sergeant Major
Joined
May 23, 2018
AMERICAN WW2 MEDIC.
Here's a step by step guide to show how I sculpted a 1/10th scale bust of a WW2 American Medic from a picture.
The challenge for me was I had never sculpted a dog or an American helmet before.
Made using a mixture of Magic-Sculpt and Duro epoxy putty.

View attachment 395702View attachment 395703

Once I was satisfied that I'd got a facial likeness I started on the body and the helmet.
One constructive critique I received was that the helmet in the picture below looked a bit too tall, which I was able to correct before finishing.
View attachment 395704View attachment 395705

The fourth component which was the dog was built with the Medic's hand attached.

View attachment 395706View attachment 395707

The finished result which measured approx 3 inched high.

View attachment 395708

By the way this was one I made at least 10 years ago.
That is great work . The face , the dog and the helmet are perfect . I've seen a lot of sculpts with helmets and it seems that some good sculptors struggle with G.I. and especially British WW2 helmets . Was this ever a commercial piece ?
 

rebel brit

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Thanks Kurt, it was certainly one I enjoyed doing and glad you like him.
It was around this time I was approached to do quite a few Busts, some of which were for commercial use. This one I suspect was for a private collector as I've never seen one painted.
 

Booner

2nd Lieutenant
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Joined
May 4, 2015
Location
Boonville, MO.
AMERICAN WW2 MEDIC.
Here's a step by step guide to show how I sculpted a 1/10th scale bust of a WW2 American Medic from a picture.
The challenge for me was I had never sculpted a dog or an American helmet before.
Made using a mixture of Magic-Sculpt and Duro epoxy putty.

View attachment 395702View attachment 395703

Once I was satisfied that I'd got a facial likeness I started on the body and the helmet.
One constructive critique I received was that the helmet in the picture below looked a bit too tall, which I was able to correct before finishing.
View attachment 395704View attachment 395705

The fourth component which was the dog was built with the Medic's hand attached.

View attachment 395706View attachment 395707

The finished result which measured approx 3 inched high.

View attachment 395708

By the way this was one I made at least 10 years ago.
R Britt,
Your talents are just remarkable! You not only captured the human, but the dog too!

I had a figure once where I lost one of the hands. I thought, "No problem, I'll just make the hand out of epoxy." That didn't turn out so well for me. It's one reason why I find your capabilities so remarkable.
Well done indeed.
 

rebel brit

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United Kingdom
60th (Royal American) Regt. French Indian War.

After seeing the picture below in one of James N. excellent 'Throwback Thursday' threads, I asked him if he would give me permission to replicate it as a flat figure.
As I wanted to stay within a 120mm height, and to enable me to capture the detail in the jacket and the flag without making the figure look too small, I decided to cut off the lower part of the body.
Disclaimer....no one was injured in the making of this figure :biggrin:

Asheville, 1991 002.jpg
Asheville, 1991 002 (3).jpg

The next step was to sculpt the figure using Beesputty which is a type of clay.
Once I was happy with it, I hardened it using a heat gun then cast it in resin.
The final stage was to paint it using acrylics and a lot of patience.

IMG_5090a.jpg
IMG_5093a.jpg
 

Kurt G

Sergeant Major
Joined
May 23, 2018
60th (Royal American) Regt. French Indian War.

After seeing the picture below in one of James N. excellent 'Throwback Thursday' threads, I asked him if he would give me permission to replicate it as a flat figure.
As I wanted to stay within a 120mm height, and to enable me to capture the detail in the jacket and the flag without making the figure look too small, I decided to cut off the lower part of the body.
Disclaimer....no one was injured in the making of this figure :biggrin:

View attachment 396281 View attachment 396282
The next step was to sculpt the figure using Beesputty which is a type of clay.
Once I was happy with it, I hardened it using a heat gun then cast it in resin.
The final stage was to paint it using acrylics and a lot of patience.

View attachment 396284 View attachment 396286
Well done . I've had a long interest in the 60th and their service at the various frontier forts . They bore the brunt of Pontiac's Uprising . The enclosed image is of a very old diorama at reconstructed Fort Michilimackinac which is at the northern tip of Michigan's lower peninsula . Sorry for the poor image shooting through the glass . This diorama was around back in the 1960s and was still on display last time I was there a few years ago . The fort was captured by the Chippewas in 1763 .

DSC_0243.JPG
 

Booner

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Location
Boonville, MO.
Well done . I've had a long interest in the 60th and their service at the various frontier forts . They bore the brunt of Pontiac's Uprising . The enclosed image is of a very old diorama at reconstructed Fort Michilimackinac which is at the northern tip of Michigan's lower peninsula . Sorry for the poor image shooting through the glass . This diorama was around back in the 1960s and was still on display last time I was there a few years ago . The fort was captured by the Chippewas in 1763 .

View attachment 396301
That diorama was what first sparked my interest in painting miniatures.
I grew up in the thumb of Michigan. On a short family vacation in the early 60's were stopped by the fort where I got my first view of the diorama. Then every year in the late fall my father would get paid to drive our large grain truck from the thumb up through the U. P. (Upper Peninsula of Michigan), to a town in Northern Wisconsin to pick up barn cleaners for our local implement dealer. Dad would take me out of school for a couple of days so he would have someone riding with him. My price for taking the trip; I begged him to stop at the fort so I could run in and take another look at the diorama. (he would only allow me about an half an hour to toot the fort-I spent all of my time looking at the diorama).
I was at the fort a couple of years ago and the state has done a wonderful job of rebuilding the entire fort, and the diorama is still there.
 

Booner

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Location
Boonville, MO.
You paint as good as you skulpt, r britt!
And as I read your post about the 60th regiment, I thought "they sound familiar, weren't the at fort Michililmacinac?
I really did.
I had a good nights sleep last night.
 

rebel brit

1st Lieutenant
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Feb 7, 2013
Location
United Kingdom
Are you sure you dont mean it took 10 years to sculpt this? WOW!!

Is he a Japanese-American of the 442 RCT??
us medic.jpg


@DixieRifles ...............That's correct, the dog was adopted by the 442nd Regimental Medics as mascot. Here he is posing with Pvt. Ken Osaki, of Vista, CA. The dog is called 'Wahine' which means woman in Hawai`i. He is wearing a Red Cross arm band.
 

Kurt G

Sergeant Major
Joined
May 23, 2018
That diorama was what first sparked my interest in painting miniatures.
I grew up in the thumb of Michigan. On a short family vacation in the early 60's were stopped by the fort where I got my first view of the diorama. Then every year in the late fall my father would get paid to drive our large grain truck from the thumb up through the U. P. (Upper Peninsula of Michigan), to a town in Northern Wisconsin to pick up barn cleaners for our local implement dealer. Dad would take me out of school for a couple of days so he would have someone riding with him. My price for taking the trip; I begged him to stop at the fort so I could run in and take another look at the diorama. (he would only allow me about an half an hour to toot the fort-I spent all of my time looking at the diorama).
I was at the fort a couple of years ago and the state has done a wonderful job of rebuilding the entire fort, and the diorama is still there.
I had no idea you were originally from Michigan . Some of my Civil War kin settled in Bad Axe and Bay City . One became a commercial fisherman on Saginaw Bay . I also enjoyed going to the fort as a kid . Here's a picture of LaSalle's Griffon diorama also at the fort . This is also very old but it is very well done .

DSC_0247.JPG
 

rebel brit

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You paint as good as you skulpt, r britt!
And as I read your post about the 60th regiment, I thought "they sound familiar, weren't the at fort Michililmacinac?
I really did.
I had a good nights sleep last night.
Thanks @Booner and glad it brought back some happy memories for you. I know when Kurt mentioned where the diorama was located I looked up where Ft Michililmacinac was just in case I was ever in the area.
 

rebel brit

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United Kingdom
Kurt that's another great scene and that's exactly what I love about diorama's, besides the main scene of the two canoes leaving the ship and the priest giving his blessing the builder added the guy loading supply's in the hold.
 

Kurt G

Sergeant Major
Joined
May 23, 2018
Thanks @Booner and glad it brought back some happy memories for you. I know when Kurt mentioned where the diorama was located I looked up where Ft Michililmacinac was just in case I was ever in the area.
If you ever are near there it is well worth a visit . The 60th lost the fort and many were killed . Most of the officers were ransomed but the privates were mostly killed and some were eaten . Ritual cannibalism was practiced by some , but not all , of the upper Great Lakes tribes . The nearby Ottawa disapproved of what had happened and rescued a few captives . Today the soldiers are portrayed as members of the King's 8th . They occupied the fort until it was abandoned and rebuilt on nearby Mackinac Island .

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