Sgt Steele's small arms of the Infantry exhibit

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Karen Lips

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Every once in a while I am asked to put together an ACW firearms display... some accuse me of doing a nice job. They keep giving me picnic tables to put my display on, takes some figuring to make it look acceptable.

I need 6 more arms to make the display complete. M1817 rifle, M1855 rifle, M1861, French rifle, Special Model 1861, Lorenz & a Spencer Rifle. I have a good start.

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Amazing!
 
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johan_steele

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Mr. Steele: can I get your thoughts on 2-band vs. 3-band Enfield rifles, which ones you prefer and why?
I've owned a Parker Hale P58 Naval Rifle and a Parker Hale P53. I liked both, accuracy was quite acceptable and the handling was nice. But to answer your question I would want to know are you looking at re-enacting, Living History, live fire etc?

For Live Fire I would prefer that P58 I think. But for Living History the P53 would be preferable. The P53 being more versatile as it saw considerably wider use and could be used for multiple impressions. That's the quick answer anyway.
 

johan_steele

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kevikens

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I'll be happy with just sixty... I mean six more. The top arm you asked of is a shortened Potsdam. Interesting arm as there was a drygoods seller in Philadelphia prior to the war who was importing surplus arms from the continent on the cheap. Any damaged arms he would send to a local gunsmith to repair, this is one that has had the stock professionally shortened. They would then be sold to settlers & immigrants heading west. His prices were cut throat when compared to newly manufactured arms.
By any chance was the Philadelphia firm the Wurflein Brothers? They did a lot of proofing of European firearms before they were sold to the military. I have one of their Prussian naval muskets from the Suhl armory.
 

johan_steele

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By any chance was the Philadelphia firm the Wurflein Brothers? They did a lot of proofing of European firearms before they were sold to the military. I have one of their Prussian naval muskets from the Suhl armory.
I believe so, the name sounds familiar, but am not sure. I'm 500 miles away from my notes.
 
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Jobe Holiday

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The European arms were purchased by Philadelphia and then sent to Andrew Wurfflein to be cleaned and refurbished. At which time they were stamped "City of Phila", plus a tiny stamp of "A. Wurfflein" to indicate he did the work. As a side note, every one of the Model 1839 Prussian Naval Muskets I have ever seen has had City of Philadelphia ownership marks, along with A. Wurfflein's personal shop stamp.
J.
 

kevikens

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The European arms were purchased by Philadelphia and then sent to Andrew Wurfflein to be cleaned and refurbished. At which time they were stamped "City of Phila", plus a tiny stamp of "A. Wurfflein" to indicate he did the work. As a side note, every one of the Model 1839 Prussian Naval Muskets I have ever seen has had City of Philadelphia ownership marks, along with A. Wurfflein's personal shop stamp.
J.
Yes, this is the one. It has a naval cartouche in the stock, an anchor on the breech and a fixed open sight on the barrel. It is .72 caliber. They were issued to the Phila. City Guard, a militia outfit, only called up once for active duty in the late summer of 1862 when Lee invaded Md. After the war some were obtained by the local GAR and nickel plated for ceremonial use. The one I have shows very little wear except for some of the nickeling around the nipple where some plating has flaked off.
 
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johan_steele

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Last weekend at the Olmstead County Living History Fair myself, FrankConrad and Jim Coughlin set a display. Between the three of us there were 50 infantry and cavalry arms. It was a nice display which not only included ACW era arms but tools as well as an original muster roll.
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