Sgt. Robert Lee Weddington CSA North Carolina 20th Regiment Company A- HELP PLEASE!

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TSS23540

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I've been researching my family history and ancestor's activities in the Civil War and I need some help finding more information. My great-great grandfather was Robert Lee Weddington of the CSA. He had 2 brothers, Samuel A. and William M., who were in the same Company and Regiment, and a sister Mary C.

This is what I know so far:

Robert Lee Weddington was born in 1840 in Cabarrus County North Carolina.

He had many siblings and half-siblings, his parents were Col. William Addison Weddington and Eleanor Shrive Weddington.

Enlisted in Company A, North Carolina 20th Infantry Regiment on 20 Nov 1861.

Resided in Cabarrus County and enlisted at Ft. Johnson at age 21, 20 Nov 1861. Mustered in as Private and was promoted to Sargeant prior to June30/July 1, 1863. Present or accounted for until wounded and captured at Gettysburg, PA, July 1-6, 1863. Hospitalized at Davids Island, New York Harbor, until paroled and transferred to City Point, VA, where he was received August 28, 1863 for exchange. Present or accounted for until captured at or near Farmville, VA, April 6, 1865.

He relocated to Bryan, Brazos, Texas after the War. He married Arthusia Jane (Jennie) Mitchell Weddington after moving to Texas. They had 2 children, Adelle Weddington (my great grandmother) and Harvey Addison Weddington. He died in 1910 in Bryan, Brazos, Texas, and is buried in Booneville Cemetery.

ANY HELP FILLING IN THE BLANKS WITH SOME OF THIS INFO WOULD BE GREATLY APPRECIATED. I HAVE HIT AN ABSOLUTE WALL TRYING TO FIND MORE OUT, AND MY RESEARCH SKILLS ARE LIMITED.
 

DixieRifles

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Sounds like you know a lot of his history. I always like to know the when-whys of relocating out to Texas.

Im sure you would like to know more about his service such as possible battles he and his regiment fought in.
Also did he return to the same tegiment after his parole?
Do you have any of this info? (I dont mind doing a quick search but dont want to if you already have answers.)
 

lelliott19

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Hello @TSS23540 Welcome to Civil War Talk - the best place on the internet for Civil War Discussion.

I have attached the carded records from Fold 3 for your 2x great grandfather Robert Lee Weddington of Co A 20th North Carolina Infantry. At Gettysburg, where you ancestor was wounded, the 20th NC was part of Iverson's brigade, Rodes Division, Ewell's Corps. During the Appomattox campaign, when your ancestor was captured April 6, 1865, the 20th NC was Johnston's brigade, Early's Division.

EDIT TO ADD: The carded records in his file (page 3) indicate that he was a participant at Malvern Hill, South Mountain, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg (until wounded.) And other cards indicate that he indeed returned to the 20th NC after his parole.
 

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TSS23540

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I believe he returned to the same regiment after his parole, but not positive. Thanks for any additional info you can provide. I always find relocation out West to Texas fascinating as well. Basically signing up for even for peril after the War.
 
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I've been researching my family history and ancestor's activities in the Civil War and I need some help finding more information. My great-great grandfather was Robert Lee Weddington of the CSA. He had 2 brothers, Samuel A. and William M., who were in the same Company and Regiment, and a sister Mary C.

This is what I know so far:

Robert Lee Weddington was born in 1840 in Cabarrus County North Carolina.

He had many siblings and half-siblings, his parents were Col. William Addison Weddington and Eleanor Shrive Weddington.

Enlisted in Company A, North Carolina 20th Infantry Regiment on 20 Nov 1861.

Resided in Cabarrus County and enlisted at Ft. Johnson at age 21, 20 Nov 1861. Mustered in as Private and was promoted to Sargeant prior to June30/July 1, 1863. Present or accounted for until wounded and captured at Gettysburg, PA, July 1-6, 1863. Hospitalized at Davids Island, New York Harbor, until paroled and transferred to City Point, VA, where he was received August 28, 1863 for exchange. Present or accounted for until captured at or near Farmville, VA, April 6, 1865.

He relocated to Bryan, Brazos, Texas after the War. He married Arthusia Jane (Jennie) Mitchell Weddington after moving to Texas. They had 2 children, Adelle Weddington (my great grandmother) and Harvey Addison Weddington. He died in 1910 in Bryan, Brazos, Texas, and is buried in Booneville Cemetery.

ANY HELP FILLING IN THE BLANKS WITH SOME OF THIS INFO WOULD BE GREATLY APPRECIATED. I HAVE HIT AN ABSOLUTE WALL TRYING TO FIND MORE OUT, AND MY RESEARCH SKILLS ARE LIMITED.
Welcome !

Chancellorsville, VA after battle report:

Report of Lieut. Col. Nelson Slough, Twentieth North Carolina Infantry.

MAY 15, 1863.
SIR: I have the honor to report to you the conduct and behavior of my
regiment in the battles of the 2d and 3d instant, at the Wilderness
Church and Chancellorsville.

On Saturday evening, the 2d, about 5 o'clock, we arrived at a point
on the north side of the Plank road, where we formed our line of battle,
and were ordered forward to attack the enemy, which we did, being in
the front line.

After marching nearly 1 mile through a thick wood, we arrived in an
old field. Here we received a heavy volley from the enemy, posted in
an open field behind a hill. We soon advanced at a charge. The enemy
fled; we pursued, driving them before us with little opposition for about
3 miles. Night coming on, we were ordered to halt by Gen. Rodes,
the commander of our division, and soon thereafter were order to the
rear.

The next morning we were again drawn up in line of battle on the
north side of the Plank road, along a line of the enemy's breastworks,
which had been abandoned by them on the day previous. After being
properly formed, we were ordered forward, we being the third line; but
no command being given to halt, and my regiment being governed by
the right battalion, we marcher dover the second line to nearly equal
distance between the front and second line, when we halted. The front
line, being hotly engaged with the enemy, soon gave way in confusion,
passing through our line. My regiment stood firm and soon became
hotly engaged with the enemy front. The Fifth Regt. North Carolina
troops, from some cause or other, failed to come up, it being, or should
have been, on the left of our line; but it not coming up, the enemy
outflanked us on our left, and poured destructive volleys into our left
flank, which compelled us to fall black to the breastworks heretofore
named. My regiment rallied very readily. After the line of battle was
reformed and disposition made to protect our left flank, we were again
ordered forward. My regiment moved forward in good order, and soon
we became engaged with the enemy in our front, defeating them; and
soon thereafter the firing ceased, the enemy being defeated at all points,
and our victorious army in possession of the field of battle.

I cannot find words to express my admiration of the daring and heroism
displayed by both officers and men during the entire engagement. The
officers were all at their proper places, discharging their duties with zeal
and fidelity, regardless of the shot and shell of the enemy, which flew
thick around them.

So large a number of both non-commissioned officers and privates
distinguished themselves by their cool and daring conduct that I will
name but one, for fear of doing injustice. That one is Sergt. J. M. W.
Parks, of Company B; a braver and better soldier is not in my
regiment. The company officers, without any exception, behaved most
gallantly.

The annexed report will show the number of killed, wounded, and
missing in my regiment, together with their rank.*

I am, sir, most respectfully, your humble and obedient servant,

N. SLOUGH,
Lieut. Col., Cmdg. Twentieth Regt. North Carolina Troops.

Capt. D. P. HALSEY, Assistant Adjutant-Gen.

Source: Official Records Series I. Vol. 25. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 39
 
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John Hartwell

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welcome.jpeg

Here's your man's obituary from the Brazos Daily Eagle, Nov. 19, 1910. It calls him "Captain" R. L. Weddington, but gives no detail of his commission. It may have been an "honorific" title he was locally known by. Also says he left six children.

wed1.jpeg
wed2.jpeg

Nov. 16th:
wed6.jpeg

 
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John Hartwell

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A few other newspaper mentions:
wed7.jpeg

Ft. Worth Gazette, April 8, 1891

wed4.jpeg

Bryan Daily Gazette, July 20, 1907
He was a contractor, and there are a number of mentions of his building housed or other structures. He also owned rental property:
wed5.jpeg

1899

wed3.jpeg

1908​
There are also a number of "society" notices of visits from relatives, etc: eg:
wedfg.jpeg

Sept 20, 1909​
 
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Tom Elmore

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All three brothers, Robert, Samuel and William, were wounded at Gettysburg, probably all on July 1 while attacking Oak Ridge northwest of Gettysburg. Once the fighting was over that day, all three were probably carried by an ambulance to a Confederate field hospital, perhaps the one set up at the Jacob Hankey farm. Their wounds were serious enough that they could not be taken on the retreat, and so they were left behind. Like most of their comrades in the same situation, probably all three fell into Union hands on July 5, when the hospital came under Union control. All three were eventually sent on to DeCamp General Hospital on Davids' Island, New York (according to their compiled service records).

Only one, Samuel, appears on a surgeon's list that was compiled following the battle. He is identified as J. A. Wedington, with the notation that his wounds were in the back and side. It must be Samuel, since his service record recorded that he received gunshot wounds in the back and side. On July 18, Samuel was moved from the field hospital to Camp Letterman General Hospital east of town, where the care was better, and his condition improved enough that he could be transported by train to Davids' Island. Robert and William likely shared a similar experience.

The 20th North Carolina carried into action about 300 officers and enlisted men, and had 29 killed and 93 wounded, besides many being taken prisoner. Nearly their entire loss occurred within a few minutes of 2:10 p.m. on July 1. Only 62 were left in the regiment when the battle ended.
 
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Andrew

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In the September 1862 Maryland Campaign, they fought with Garland's/McRae's brigade (Garland was killed on Sep 14th at South Mountain). The 20th fought on the morning of Sep 14 at Fox's Gap on South Mountain. At Sharpsburg on Sep 17, they saw action around the East Woods and later at the western end of the Sunken Road.

Here is a brief narrative of the fighting (which includes a map) on the morning of Sep 14, 1862 at Fox's Gap.

Here's a link to the NC monument at Fox's Gap on South Mountain, which was placed not too far from where the 20th North Carolina's saw its most heated action.
 
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TSS23540

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Yall are amazing and have brought so much to light. Amazing researching. Thanks for all the information so far!
 
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