★  Seymour, Truman

Truman Seymour Jr.

:us34stars:
Seymour.jpg


Born: September 24, 1824

Birthplace: Burlington, Vermont

Father: Rev. Truman Seymour Sr. 1799 – 1874
(Buried: Albany Rural Cemetery, Menands, New York)​

Mother: Anne Armstrong 1799 – 1873
(Buried: Albany Rural Cemetery, Menands, New York)​

Wife: Louisa Weir 1832 – 1919
(Buried: U.S. Military Academy Post Cemetery, West Point, New York)​

Children:

Truman Seymour III 1859 – 1859​
(Buried: U.S. Military Academy Post Cemetery, West Point, New York)​

Education:

1846: Graduated from West Point Military Academy – (19th in class)​
1865: Received A. M. Degree from Williams College​

Occupation before War:

1846 – 1847: Brevet 2nd Lt. United States Army, 1st Artillery​
1846: Garrison Duty at Fort Pickens, Florida​
1847: 2nd Lt. United States Army, 1st Artillery​
1847: Served in the Battle of Cerro Gordo, Mexico​
1847: Served in the Battle of Contreras, Mexico​
1847: Served in the Battle of Churubusco, Mexico​
1847: Brevetted Captain for his role at Contreras, & Churubusco​
1847: Served in the Assault and Capture of Mexico City, Mexico​
1847 – 1860: 1st Lt. United States Army, 1st Artillery​
1848 – 1849: Garrison Duty at Fort Hamilton, New York​
1849 – 1850: Garrison Duty at Fort Columbus, New York​
1850 – 1853: Assistant Drawing Professor at West Point​
1853 – 1856: Garrison Duty at Fort Moultrie, South Carolina​
1856 – 1858: Served in Florida, in the Seminole War​
1858 – 1859: Recruiter for United States Army​
1859 – 1860: Leave of Absence in Europe​
1860: Garrison Duty at Fort Moultrie, South Carolina​
1860 – 1861: Captain, United States Army, 1st Artillery​
1860 – 1861: Served in the Defenses of Fort Sumter, South Carolina​

Civil War Career:

1860 – 1861: Captain United States Army, 1st Artillery​
1861: Served in the Bombardment of Fort Sumter, South Carolina​
1861: Brevetted Major for Gallantry in Defenses of Fort Sumter​
1861: Commander of Camp Instruction at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania​
1861 – 1866: Captain United States Army, 5th Artillery​
1861 – 1862: Served in the Defenses of Washington, D.C.​
1862: Chief of Artillery for McCall’s Division in Union Army​
1862 – 1865: Brigadier General in Union Army, Volunteers​
1862: Brigade Commander at Battle of Mechanicsville Virginia​
1862: Brigade Commander at Battle of Gaines Mill, Virginia​
1862: Brigade Commander at Battle of Glendale, Virginia​
1862: Brigade Commander at Battle of Malvern Hill, Virginia​
1862: Brigade Commander at Second Battle of Bull Run, Virginia​
1862: Served in the Battles of South Mountain, and Antietam​
1862: Brevetted Lt. Colonel, for Gallantry at Battle of South Mountain​
1862: Served in the march to Falmouth, Virginia​
1862: Brevetted Colonel, for Gallantry at Battle of Antietam​
1863: Chief of Staff and Chief of Artillery in Department of the South​
1863: Division Commander on Folly Island, South Carolina
Seymour 1.jpg
1863: Division Commander in the Descent on Morris Island, South Carolina​
1863: Wounded during the Assault on Fort Wagner​
1863 – 1864: Union Army Commander at Hilton Head, Fort Pulaski​
1864: Union Army Commander of Expedition to Florida​
1864: Took possession of Jacksonville, Florida on February 7th
1864: Union Army Commander for District of Florida​
1864: Union Army Commander at Battle of Olustee, Florida​
1864: Captured at the Battle of the Wilderness, Virginia​
1864: Prisoner of war until exchanged on August 9th in Charleston​
1864: Division Commander in Operations of Shenandoah Valley​
1864 – 1865: Served in the Siege of Petersburg, Virginia​
1865: Brevetted Major General for the way he handled his troops​
1865: Brevetted Major General in U.S. Army for his service in war​
1865: Served in the Battle of Sayler’s Creek, Virginia​
1865: Served in the pursuit of Lee to Appomattox, Virginia​
1865: Served in the March to Washington, D.C.​
1865: Mustered out of the Union Army on August 24th

Occupation after War:

1861 – 1866: Captain, United States Army 5th Artillery​
1865 – 1866: U.S. Army, Commander of Key West, Florida​
1866 – 1868: U.S. Army, Commander of Pensacola, Florida​
1600345403078.png

"A View of the Hudson River" - A painting by Truman Seymour
Created sometime before 1891
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Public Domain Artwork

1866 – 1876: Major, United States Army 5th​ Artillery​
1868 – 1869: Member of U.S. Army, Artillery Board​
1869 – 1870: U.S. Army, Commander of Fort Warren, Massachusetts​
1870 – 1875: U.S. Army, Commander of Fort Preble, Maine​

1875 – 1876: U.S. Army, Commander of Fort Barranacas, Florida​
1876: Retired from United States Army after 30 years’ service​
1876 – 1891: Became Prolific in his paintings in Europe​

Died: October 30, 1891

Place of Death: Florence, Italy

Cause of Death: Heart Disease

Age at time of Death:
67 years old

Burial Place: Cimitero Evangelico degli Allori, Florence, Italy
 
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Virginia Dave

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Location
Waynesboro, Virginia
Truman Seymour Jr.:
:us34stars:
Born: September 24, 1824View attachment 374620
Birthplace: Burlington Vermont
Father: Rev. Truman Seymour Sr. 1799 – 1874
(Buried: Albany Rural Cemetery Menands New York)
Mother: Anne Armstrong 1799 – 1873
(Buried: Albany Rural Cemetery Menands New York)
Wife: Louisa Weir 1832 – 1919
(Buried: U.S. Military Academy Post Cemetery West Point New York)
Children:
Truman Seymour III 1859 – 1859
(Buried: U.S. Military Academy Post Cemetery West Point New York)

Education:
1846: Graduated from West Point Military Academy – (19th​ in class)
1865: Received A. M. Degree from Williams College

Occupation before War:
1846 – 1847: Brevet 2nd​ Lt. United States Army 1st​ Artillery
1846: Garrison Duty at Fort Pickens Florida
1847: 2nd​ Lt. United States Army 1st​ Artillery
1847: Served in the Battle of Cerro Gordo Mexico
1847: Served in the Battle of Contreras Mexico
1847: Served in the Battle of Churubusco Mexico
1847: Brevetted Captain for his role at Contreras & Churubusco
1847: Served in the Assault and Capture of Mexico City Mexico
1847 – 1860: 1st​ Lt. United States Army 1st​ Artillery
1848 – 1849: Garrison Duty at Fort Hamilton New York
1849 – 1850: Garrison Duty at Fort Columbus New York
1850 – 1853: Assistant Drawing Professor at West Point
1853 – 1856: Garrison Duty at Fort Moultrie South Carolina
1856 – 1858: Served in Florida in the Seminole War
1858 – 1859: Recruiter for United States Army
1859 – 1860: Leave of Absence in Europe
1860: Garrison Duty at Fort Moultrie South Carolina
1860 – 1861: Captain United States Army 1st​ Artillery
1860 – 1861: Served in the Defenses of Fort Sumter South Carolina

Civil War Career:
1860 – 1861: Captain United States Army 1st​ Artillery
1860 – 1861: Served in the Defenses of Fort Sumter South Carolina
1861: Served in the Bombardment of Fort Sumter South Carolina
1861: Brevetted Major for Gallantry in Defenses of Fort Sumter
1861: Commander of Camp Instruction at Harrisburg Pennsylvania
1861 – 1866: Captain United States Army 5th​ Artillery
1861 – 1862: Served in the Defenses of Washington D.C.
1862: Chief of Artillery for McCall’s Division in Union Army
1862 – 1865: Brigadier General in Union Army Volunteers
1862: Brigade Commander at Battle of Mechanicsville Virginia
1862: Brigade Commander at Battle of Gaines Mill Virginia
1862: Brigade Commander at Battle of Glendale Virginia
1862: Brigade Commander at Battle of Malvern Hill Virginia
1862: Brigade Commander at Second Battle of Bull Run Virginia
1862: Served in the Battles of South Mountain and Antietam
1862: Brevetted Lt. Colonel for Gallantry at Battle of South Mountain
1862: Served in the march to Falmouth Virginia
1862: Brevetted Colonel for Gallantry at Battle of Antietam
1863: Chief of Staff and Chief of Artillery in Department of the South
1863: Division Commander on Folly Island South CarolinaView attachment 374621
1863: Division Commander in the Descent on Morris Island S.C.
1863: Wounded during the Assault on Fort Wagner
1863 – 1864: Union Army Commander at Hilton Head, Fort Pulaski
1864: Union Army Commander of Expedition to Florida
1864: Took possession of Jacksonville Florida on February 7th​
1864: Union Army Commander for District of Florida
1864: Union Army Commander at Battle of Olustee Florida
1864: Captured at the Battle of the Wilderness Virginia
1864: Prisoner of war until exchanged on August 9th​ in Charleston
1864: Division Commander in Operations of Shenandoah Valley
1864 – 1865: Served in the Siege of Petersburg Virginia
1865: Brevetted Major General for the way he handled his troops
1865: Brevetted Major General in U.S. Army for his service in war
1865: Served in the Battle of Sayler’s Creek Virginia
1865: Served in the pursuit of Lee to Appomattox Virginia
1865: Served in the March to Washington D.C.
1865: Mustered out of the Union Army on August 24th​

Occupation after War:
1861 – 1866: Captain United States Army 5th​ Artillery
1865 – 1866: U.S. Army Commander of Key West Florida
1866 – 1868: U.S. Army Commander of Pensacola Florida
1866 – 1876: Major United States Army 5th​ Artillery
1868 – 1869: Member of U.S. Army Artillery Board
1869 – 1870: U.S. Army Commander of Fort Warren Massachusetts
1870 – 1875: U.S. Army Commander of Fort Preble Maine
1875 – 1876: U.S. Army Commander of Fort Barranacas Florida
1876: Retired from United States Army after 30 years’ service
1876 – 1891: Became Prolific in his paintings in Europe


Died:
October 30, 1891
Place of Death: Florence Italy
Cause of Death: Heart Disease
Age at time of Death:
67 years old
Burial Place: Cimitero Evangelico degli Allori Florence Italy
Quite a history. Looks like he never took a day off.
 
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Location
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The Battle at Olustee, Fl. was one of the most evenly matched of the war. One source has it as 5,115 Union soldiers against 5,200 Confederate soldiers under Joseph Finegan. It was however a defeat for Seymour as he received twice the causulties, (about 2,000 to 1,000)
 

Arioch

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In the aftermath of the Battle of Glendale 1862, on the Peninsula, Seymour assumed command of the Pa. Reserves division when McCall was captured and Meade wounded.

In the subsequent retreat to Harrison's landing (and battle of Malvern Hill) Seymour ordered that the wounded be left behind. The rank and file troops of the Reserves despised him for this decision, and never trusted him afterwards. Many defied that order and slipped back to the field hospitals to carry their buddies away with them, and not leave them to the confederates.
 

Bruce Vail

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Jul 8, 2015
Seymour commanded the troops that repelled the Confederate attack at Ellerson's Mill during the Battle of Mechanicsville. His men, particularly the artillery units, did a good job of shredding the Confederate assault. Confederate Gen. D.H. Hill would later criticize Robert E. Lee for ordering a hopeless attack and causing the pointless death of hundreds of Confederates.
 
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He wasn't the only General captured during the Battle of the Wilderness in Gordon's flank attack.Brigadier General Alexander Shaler was captured as well.
Seymour and Shaler were two of the five generals confined in Charleston when that city was under fire by Union Artillery.The 5 generals wrote to Washington to deny that they were placed in unnecessary danger. Seymour was exchanged in August 1864.
 
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I do believe that he was commanding Battery H, 1st US Artillery at Sumter. Battery E was commanded by Abner Doubleday.

Ryan
I was a little confused as the biography states that he was at Fort Moultrie preparing for the war. Then it states Seymour commanded an artillery company against the Confederate assault on Fort Sumter but doesn't specifically state just where from during the siege.Thanks!
 

rpkennedy

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Location
Carlisle, PA
I'm a little confused as the biography states that he was at Fort Moultrie preparing for the war. Then it states Seymour commanded an artillery company against the Confederate assault on Fort Sumter but doesn't specifically state just where from during the siege.Thanks!

The garrison at Ft. Moultrie was evacuated by Major Anderson and added to the force at Ft. Sumter.

Ryan
 

Lubliner

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Nov 27, 2018
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee
He received a good amount of Brevet promotions except during the Peninsula Campaign, and of course, Olustee. Is failure at Olustee was severe, and many of those 'even numbered' troops were untrained Colored Troops, that received many casualties.
How did he perform during the 7 days on the Peninsula? He was breveted twice afterward for South Mountain and Antietam. I assume he performed well, though the order to abandon the wounded hurt his reputation. How did McClellan get along with him?
Thanks,
Lubliner.
 
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Location
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I don't really know what was the biggest class at West Point after the War but his class of 1846 was probably the largest,pre-war anyway,it had 59. And it contained a few "heavy hitters" from the Civil War like Stonewall Jackson and George McClellan.
 
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