The Peninsula Seven Days numbers for Lee and McClellan

Elennsar

Colonel
Joined
May 14, 2008
Location
California
According to the http://www.gamersarchive.net/theGamers/archive/cwb.htm folks (who seem to do their research fairly well as best as I can determine)

For Lee: Recently, Avalon Hill published On to Richmond, the latest in Joe Balkoski’s series of operational ACW games. In that game, the designers commented that they felt that Lee’s numbers were under reported, and that the Rebel army really had numeric parity with McClellan. Players have already asked my what my game shows, and how much it jives with this research. First of all, the full Rebel strength in these games is about 83,000 infantry and cavalry, including the troops that were deployed around the southside of the James to prevent a surprise Union move against Richmond from that flank. These men were certainly part of the Richmond defensive force, even if they never saw action against the Federal Army of the Potomac during the week in question. Uncounted in those numbers are the almost 10,000 artillerymen hidden in the artillery counters but not explicitly represented as manpower numbers. Essentially, then, the Rebel Army in Malvern Hill counts out at about 93,000 men, not so very far off from On to Richmond’s estimate of 103,000 Rebel Troops. Next, we need to count the 1500 or so
Richmond militia organized out of industrial and government workers, and note that the are always several thousand troops included in an army (provosts, train guards, etc.) that never get included in my combat strength numbers, and which will certainly put the overall numbers of Confederate troops within the higher estimate.

For McClellan: Relying more on the overall army returns would indeed reflect
higher overall strengths, something that is as true in the Federal army as it is in Lee’s command: By his overall returns McClellan had maybe 120,000 troops in action, but by relying on the regimental reports you get numbers closer to 100,000 than otherwise.

According to http://www.brettschulte.net/CWBlog/...al-level-orders-of-battle-the-seven-days-oob/

Lee: Roughly 109,000 total (including 11,400 "miscellanous"- including roughly 1200 in the reserve artillery and 4,100 cavalry - but also including the Richmond heavy artillery and troops that saw absolutely no field battle), plus 6,400 men with Holmes that would have very little direct presence in the campaign, and virtually none offensively - so say roughly 97,000.

McClellan: Roughly 100,000 total, including 5,000 "miscellanous", not counting McDowell.

http://www.icsm.it/secessione/cb02oob.html

calculates both as being roughly 105,000 all totalled.

So as best as I can tell from three distinct sources, which have no connection, McClellan may not have had sufficient numbers to successfully attack and defeat Lee as one might wish, at least not in a direct clash of armies. He's in no danger of being enveloped or any other such disaster except in his imagination, nor does Lee have the forces to make his "change of base" necessary.

One could find other sources, but given that two of those are done for wargaming purposes, where having a pretty accurate count is important to properly represent the situation - I find it very unlikely that Lee is being underrepresented or McClellan overrpresented.
 

67th Tigers

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Nov 10, 2006
For McClellan: Relying more on the overall army returns would indeed reflect
higher overall strengths, something that is as true in the Federal army as it is in Lee’s command: By his overall returns McClellan had maybe 120,000 troops in action, but by relying on the regimental reports you get numbers closer to 100,000 than otherwise.

According to http://www.brettschulte.net/CWBlog/...al-level-orders-of-battle-the-seven-days-oob/

McClellan: Roughly 100,000 total, including 5,000 "miscellanous", not counting McDowell.

http://www.icsm.it/secessione/cb02oob.html

We have the strength of the AoP; 54,043 plus 24,690 present sick. (and some of the 10,937 sick in general hospital too I'd imagine). McDowell had 37,800 plus 10,355 present sick. There's also the Banks in the Shenandoah with 11,316 plus 3,075 present sick, and another 6,048 and 1,203 present sick.
 

Nytram01

First Sergeant
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Location
Portsmouth, Hampshire, England
I must admit, though this may be a bit off topic, that I find it strange how that little period between Seven Pines/Fair Oaks ending and the Seven Day's starting generally is ignored....er...to stronger word...overlooked is better.

Generally the way the situation is presented is this: Johnston wounded - Lee takes command - launches offensive and drives McClellan away. Now, while this is all fine and accurate it overlooks those crucial 24 odd days where Lee was able to concentrate manpower into his Army.

With Johnston wounded and out of action the Confederate command structure in Virginia was no longer split between Lee and Johnston and Lee could focus all his efforts on his target without having to worry about Johnston and his targets.

So the Army Lee inherited from Johnston was made up of effectively of the troops Johnston had influence over in Virginia, which came to somewhere between 50-60,000 men and then Lee then spent about 24 days enlarging this Army - something Joe Johnston had been wanting to do since 1st Manassas but lacked the trust and support of the Government to do -to around 92,000 men.

This may seem like splitting hairs but the generalized presentation of the transfer of command of the Confederate premier Army from Joe Johnston to Bobby Lee make very little mention of this reinforcement, pay very little attention to the concentration of force that occured during this period.

For some reason this important fact often goes overlooked and the Seven Days are generally represented as completely outnumbered Lee and the ANV driving off the vastly superior numbered AotP where Johnston had failed.

The fact that Lee realized the army he inherited from Johnston was not strong enough to achieve his aims and that he would have to reorganize the command structure of it does little to diminish his status as a great general.

That he wasn't completely ountumbered also does little to diminsh his success in the Seven Days (Strategic success you understand - he only really scored one victory in the whole of that series of battles, lost twice and had a whole lot of inconclusives).

I just dont really understand why this often gets overlooked. It's not outrightly ignored, that Lee reinforced before launching on the Seven Days, but its not really publisized either.
 

Elennsar

Colonel
Joined
May 14, 2008
Location
California
We have the strength of the AoP; 54,043 plus 24,690 present sick. (and some of the 10,937 sick in general hospital too I'd imagine). McDowell had 37,800 plus 10,355 present sick. There's also the Banks in the Shenandoah with 11,316 plus 3,075 present sick, and another 6,048 and 1,203 present sick.

Those numbers on the Army of the Potomac and McDowell do not seem supported by anything else on the Seven Days.

How you can go from 100,000 odd when counting what regiments are presenting with the colors to "54,043 (not counting sick" is beyond me. There's no motivation for the colonels to claim their ranks are fuller than they really are.

I must admit, though this may be a bit off topic, that I find it strange how that little period between Seven Pines/Fair Oaks ending and the Seven Day's starting generally is ignored....er...to stronger word...overlooked is better.

Fine by me to to discuss it - the issue of Confederate reinforcements arriving for Lee but not Johnston needs a discussion too, and this is a good place for it.

Part of them - at least 10,000 - are arriving from Jackson (and would whether or not Lee was in command). This does not count the men "transfered" the Shenandoah and coming back with him.

I just dont really understand why this often gets overlooked. It's not outrightly ignored, that Lee reinforced before launching on the Seven Days, but its not really publisized either.

Leecentric writing, perhaps.

I'd say more, but I can't think of anything more on the topic. I'd be glad to discuss it, I'm just fresh out of thoughts.

How many men outside those Johnston commanded (which includes Jackson) did Lee manage to draw in?

And from where?
 

Nytram01

First Sergeant
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Location
Portsmouth, Hampshire, England
Fine by me to to discuss it - the issue of Confederate reinforcements arriving for Lee but not Johnston needs a discussion too, and this is a good place for it.

Part of them - at least 10,000 - are arriving from Jackson (and would whether or not Lee was in command). This does not count the men "transfered" the Shenandoah and coming back with him....

...Leecentric writing, perhaps.

I'd say more, but I can't think of anything more on the topic. I'd be glad to discuss it, I'm just fresh out of thoughts.

How many men outside those Johnston commanded (which includes Jackson) did Lee manage to draw in?

And from where?

Lee brought Theophilus H. Holmes Command in to the ANV. Holmes' had been detatched from Johnston's Army sometime after 1st Manassas and stationed at Fredericksburg and Aquia Creek where he fell under the strategic control of Lee and out of Johnston's jurisdiction. I read somewhere that Holmes' had been transfered to North Carolina prior or during the Peninsular campaign but I'm not sure, if that's true, what force he brought with him when Lee called on him.

According to this site http://www.civilwarhome.com/CMHsevendays.htm Lee brought 15,000 men up from the Carolina's - which was again a course of action Johnston had been championing prior to his wounding - so we could assume that this was Holmes' command.

If that sites right then Lee inherited an Army of about 57,000 men from Joe Johnston, brought in Holmes' command of about 15,000 men and then brought in Jackson's command of about 10,000 men but that still leave it about 10,000 men short of the 92,000 man mark.

I'm not sure where those remaining 10,000 men came from at the moment, perhaps they were in Richmond, defending the capitol or something, but the point is that Lee found them and faced McClellan with far more even odds than Johnston ever did and with a better chance for success than we (I'm using a generalizing term here) are lead to believe.

As I said before, it does little to diminish his status as a great general or tarnish his legacy so there's no real reason to overlook this reinforcement is there?
 

Elennsar

Colonel
Joined
May 14, 2008
Location
California
There's roughly 6,000 or so in the Richmond defenses - heavy artillery etc., and 4,000+ from Whiting would make sense.

As for why its underreported - well, it does make Lee look better to lead 70,000 men against McClellan's 120,000 or something.

Still odd.
 

67th Tigers

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Nov 10, 2006
Those numbers on the Army of the Potomac and McDowell do not seem supported by anything else on the Seven Days.

They are consistent with the sample of brigade effective strengths reported in the ORs, which typically range from 800-1,000 per brigade, but the sample set is very limited.

How you can go from 100,000 odd when counting what regiments are presenting with the colors to "54,043 (not counting sick" is beyond me. There's no motivation for the colonels to claim their ranks are fuller than they really are.

Oh, that's easy; money. The adjutant-generals figures are always higher than the surgeon-generals figures since the former is the number of people who were paid, and the latter was the number present.

Part of them - at least 10,000 - are arriving from Jackson (and would whether or not Lee was in command). This does not count the men "transfered" the Shenandoah and coming back with him.

http://67thtigers.blogspot.com/2009/03/seven-days-confederate-orbat.html

22,099 under Jackson.
 

Elennsar

Colonel
Joined
May 14, 2008
Location
California
They are consistent with the sample of brigade effective strengths reported in the ORs, which typically range from 800-1,000 per brigade, but the sample set is very limited.

Funny how none of the other sources agree with that.

Oh, that's easy; money. The adjutant-generals figures are always higher than the surgeon-generals figures since the former is the number of people who were paid, and the latter was the number present.

That doesn't explain why the regimental commanders would be reporting extra men.

22,099 under Jackson.

Even if that's counting Whiting's division and Lawton, Jackson barely had that many men at the height of his Valley Campaign forces, and by the time they're being moved to the Pennisula, they've just been through a very tiring campaign.
 

Dred

First Sergeant
Joined
Jun 22, 2007
Location
Tulsa, Oklahoma
Just something to consider on numbers that pertains to the entire war;

Grant surmised in his Memoirs that he did not believe he ever reached numerical superiority over the rebs at any time until Richmond. He goes on to explain why, due to sick call, extra or special duty, what have you. He thought at best they were evenly matched as far as numbers in the actual fighting.
 

Elennsar

Colonel
Joined
May 14, 2008
Location
California
If any general in the history of war has ever proclaimed he had overpowering numbers (except to an enemy), I haven't heard of him.

It is true though that the supposed strength advantage could rapidly deplete due to all those things Grant mentioned - but the responsibility for keeping those in check so there's still enough of an army to fight with is on the shoulders of the commander.
 

bschulte

Sergeant
Joined
Jul 31, 2005
Funny how none of the other sources agree with that.

The numbers at my site are Present for Duty. If 67th is using the term effectives like I think he is, that accounts for at least part of the discrepancy. Effectives does not include officers, for one.
 

67th Tigers

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Nov 10, 2006
The numbers at my site are Present for Duty. If 67th is using the term effectives like I think he is, that accounts for at least part of the discrepancy. Effectives does not include officers, for one.

The figures above as those recorded in the Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion (Surgeon-General of the United States, Washington, 1870). It's a book that has some interesting parts; for example just under half (26,297) of the combat deaths with causes recorded were from roundshot and the remaining 33,563 were from small projectiles (musketry, canister and shrapnel). However it took 235,585 injuries by small projectiles to cause that number of deaths.

They are the monthly average figures, which were averaged from returns on the 10th, 20th and 30th of the month, and so may understate strength if there was any reinforcement.

Atlantic Region (i.e. Eastern Theatre) as a whole has seen the number of present decline month on month since January (238,144) and sits at 186,885 present of whom 48,808 are sick and injured in the June 1862 return and 1,669 died. The month of June shows 4,583 present with serial 133 (gunshot wound) and 1,042 dead in the same serial. May shows 2,172 present with serial 133 and 596 dead by that cause.

July 1862 (which is in the next medicial year, so I have to shift tables) shows an average of 106,069 present of whom 42,911 are sick and 371 died. Only 114 deaths by gunshot were recorded, which matches the rates in March, April and May, indicating that the strength and dead of the Seven Days, excepting Malvern Hill (explicitly stated to have had the casualties including in the July return) are included in the June return.

No idea if this table will come out but:


June July August September
East (New England and Middle States) No Return 1,699 2,322 3,020
Middle 5,370 12,357 9,135 19,101
Shenandoah 14,391 - - -
Rappahanock 48,155 - - -
Washington No Return 70,086 51,878 16,840
Potomac 78,733 106,069 69,320 149,052
Virginia 7,251 12,966 11,055 16,699
North Carolina 16,649 10,039 10,095 10,535
South 16,336 14,203 13,145 13,857
General Hospital 10,397 14,434 22,654 38,351
Total 197,282 241,853 189,604 267,455

As you can see, McClellan's return for the "Army of the Potomac" seems to include all forces under his nominal command including 1st Corps (Dept of the Rappahanock).
 

M E Wolf

Colonel
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2008
Location
Virginia
One has to track activities and movements by dates really-- Days of no official battles could be explained by marching and or resting at a spot.

O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XI/1 [S# 12]
THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN, VIRGINIA
March 17-September 2, 1862.(*)
PART I.
REPORTS--March 17-June 24, 1862.
SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS. (+)
Mar. 17, 1862. -- Embarkation of the Army of the Potomac commenced at Alexandria, Va.
26, 1862. -- Confederate Department of Henrico, under command of Brig. Gen. John H. Winder, extended to embrace Petersburg and vicinity.
27, 1862. -- General Joseph E. Johnston, C. S. Army, ordered to re-enforce the Army of the Peninsula.
31, 1862. -- Blenker's division ordered to Mountain (Frémont's) Department.
April 1-2, 1862. -- Headquarters Army of the Potomac transferred to vicinity of Fort Monroe.
4, 1862. -- The First Army Corps (McDowell's) detached from Army of the Potomac and merged into Department of the Rappahannock. The Fifth Army Corps (Banks')merged into the Department of the Shenandoah.
Skirmish at Howard's Mill, near Cockletown.
5-May 4, 1862. -- Siege of Yorktown.
11, 1862. -- Confederate naval operations in Hampton Roads.
12, 1862. -- Command of General Joseph E. Johnston, C. S. Army, extended over the Departments of Norfolk and the Peninsula.
22, 1862. -- Franklin's division arrives at Yorktown.
May 4, 1862. -- Skirmishes near Williamsburg.
5, 1862. -- Battle of Williamsburg.
6, 1862. -- Williamsburg occupied by the Union forces.
7, 1862. -- Engagement at West Point, Barhamsville, or Eltham's Landing.
7-8, 1862. -- Reconnaissance to Mulberry Point, James River.
8, 1862. -- Naval demonstration upon Sewell's Point.
May 9, 1862. -- Norfolk evacuated by the Confederate forces.
Skirmish at Slatersville.
10, l862. -- Norfolk and Portsmouth occupied by the Union forces.
13, 1862. -- Skirmish at Baltimore Cross-Roads, near New Kent Court-House.
15, 1862. -- Engagement at Fort Darling, James River.
17, 1862. -- Maj. Gen. Irvin McDowell ordered to move upon Richmond in co-operation with Major-General McClellan.
Expedition up the Pamunkey River.
18, 1862. -- Brig. Gen. Fitz John Porter, U.S. Army, assumes command of Fifth Army Corps (reorganized).
Maj. Gen. William B. Franklin, U.S. Army, assumes command of Sixth Army Corps.
18-19, 1862. -- Reconnaissance toward Old Church.
19,1862. -- Skirmish at City Point, James River.
Skirmish at Gaines' Mill.
20-23, 1862. -- Operations about Bottom's Bridge, Chickahominy River.
21, 1862. -- Advance across Bottom's Bridge.
22, 1862. -- Reconnaissance to New Castle and Hanovertown Ferries.
23, 1862. -- Reconnaissance from Bottom's Bridge toward Richmond.
Reconnaissance from Bottom's Bridge to the Turkey Island Creek Bridge.
Skirmish at Ellison's Mill, near Mechanicsville.
Skirmish at Hogan's, near New Bridge.
24, 1862. -- McDowell's orders to move upon Richmond suspended. Skirmish at New Bridge. Skirmish at Seven Pines. Skirmish at Mechanicsville.
Reconnaissance toward Hanover Court-House.
25-26, 1862. -- Expedition from Bottom's Bridge to James River.
26, 1862. -- Reconnaissance toward Hanover Court-House. 27, 1862.
-- Skirmish at Slash Church.
Skirmish at White Oaks.
27-29, 1862. -- Engagement at Hanover Court-House (27th) and operations (28th-29th) in that vicinity.
28, 1862. -- Virginia Central Railroad Bridge, on South Anna River, destroyed by Union forces.
Destruction of Confederate supplies at Ashland.
29, 1862. -- Skirmish near Seven Pines.
Richmond and Fredericksburg Railroad Bridge, on South Anna River, destroyed.
30, 1862. -- Skirmish near Fair Oaks.
Skirmish near Zuni.
31-June 1, 1862. -- Battle of Fair Oaks, or Seven Pines.

June 1, 1862. -- General Robert E. Lee, C. S. Army, assumes command of the Army of Northern Virginia.
The Department of Virginia extended and embraced in Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan's command, Maj. Gen. John E. Wool, U.S. Army, being assigned to the Middle Department, and Maj. Gen. John A. Dix, U.S. Army, to command at Fort Monroe.
1- 2, 1862. -- Reconnaissance beyond Seven Pines.
2, 1862. -- Expedition to Wormley's Ferry, Pamunkey River.
3- 7, 1862. -- Reconnaissance to the James River to communicate with the Union fleet.
5, 1862. -- Skirmish at New Bridge.
7, 1862. -- Reconnaissance on east bank of the Chickahominy.
June 8, 1862. -- Skirmish near Fair Oaks.
Major-General McDowell ordered, under conditions stated, to operate in the direction of Richmond.
Reconnaissance on the New Market Road.
11, 1862. -- Re-enforcements sent from Army of Northern Virginia to the Valley District.
12-13, 1862. -- McCall's division re-enforces the Army of the Potomac.
13-15, 1862. -- Stuart's raid, including skirmishes at Hawes' Shop, Old Church, and Garlick's Landing.
15, 1862. -- Reconnaissance to vicinity of New Market.
Skirmish near Seven Pines.
Parley between Brig. Gen. Howell Cobb, C. S. Army, and Col. Thomas M. Key, U.S. Army.
17, 1862.- -- Jackson's command moves from vicinity of Staunton and Weyer's Cave for the Peninsula.
18, 1862. -- Skirmish near Fair Oaks.
Skirmish on Nine Mile Road, near Richmond.
19, 1862. -- Skirmish on the Charles City Road, near Richmond.
20, 1862. -- Skirmish near New Bridge.
Affair at Gill's Bluff, James River.
21, 1862. -- The Confederate Department of North Carolina extended to the south bank of James River.
Skirmish near Fair Oaks Station.
22-23, 1862. -- Reconnaissance to the left of White Oak Swamp.
23, 1862. -- Operations about New Kent Court-House.
24, l862. -- Skirmish near Mechanicsville.
25-July 1, 1862. -- " The Seven-days' Battles."
27, 1862. -- Jackson re-enforces Army of Northern Virginia.
28-July 4, 1862. -- Expedition from Fort Monroe to open communication with Army of the Potomac.
July 2, 1862. -- Skirmish near New Kent Court-House. Skirmish at Malvern Hill. Affair near Haxall's Landing.
3, 1862. -- Reconnaissance from Harrison's Landing, on Charles City Road.
3-4, 1862. -- Skirmishes near Herring Creek, or Harrison's Landing.
4, 1862. -- Reconnaissance from Harrison's Landing.
Skirmish at Westover.
5- 6, 1862. -- Operations against Union shipping, James River.
7- 9, 1862. -- Reconnaissance from Yorktown.
9, 1862. -- Reconnaissance on the Long Bridge Road.
10, 1862. -- Reconnaissance from Harrison's Landing toward White Oak Swamp and skirmish.
11, 1862. -- Reconnaissance from Harrison's Landing beyond Charles City Court-House, Va.
16, 1862. -- Reconnaissance from Westover, on the Richmond Road.
22, 1862. -- Maj. Gen. John A. Dix assumes command of the Seventh Army Corps, Department of Virginia.
Maj. Gen. A. E. Burnside assumes command of the Ninth Army Corps.
Affair near Westover.
22-30, 1862. -- Scout in King William, King and Queen, and Gloucester Counties.
23, 1862. -- Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck assumes command of the Armies of the United States.
29, 1862. -- Reconnaissance from Harrison's Landing to Saint Mary's Church.
July 30,1862. -- McClellan ordered to remove his sick, etc.
Reconnaissance from Harrison's Landing to Jones' Ford, Chickahominy River.
31-Aug. 1,1862. -- Attack on Union camps and shipping between Shirley and Harrison's Landing.
Aug. 2-8,1862. -- Reconnaissance from Harrison's Landing and reoccupation of Malvern Hill by the Union forces.
3,1862. -- Reconnaissance on south side of James River and skirmish at Sycamore Church.
McClellan ordered to withdraw his forces to Aquia Creek.
4-5,1862. -- Reconnaissance from Coggins Point beyond Sycamore Church.
5,1862. -- Skirmish at White Oak Swamp Bridge.
Engagement at Malvern Hill.
6,1862. -- Skirmish at Malvern Hill.
13,1862. -- Preliminary orders issued for the movement of the Army of Northern Virginia from the Peninsula.
14-15,1862. -- The Third and Fifth Army Corps move from Harrison's Landing for Aquia Creek.
14-19,1862. -- Operations of the cavalry covering the rear of the Army of the Potomac from Harrison's Landing to Williamsburg.
17,1862. -- Reconnaissance toward Forge Bridge.
20,1862. -- The Fifth Army Corps embarked at Newport News.
21,1862. -- The Third Army Corps sail from Yorktown.
23,1862. -- The Sixth Army Corps embarked at Fort Monroe.
26,1862. -- The Second Army Corps left Fort Monroe.
 

M E Wolf

Colonel
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2008
Location
Virginia
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XI/2 [S# 13]
THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN, VIRGINIA.
March 17-September 2, 1862.
PART II.
REPORTS--June 25-September 2, 1862.(*)
-----
June 25-JULY 1, 1862.--Seven-days' Battles.
-----
SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS.(*)
June 25,1862. -- Skirmish near Ashland.
Engagement at Oak Grove, King's School-House, French's Field, or the Orchard.
26, 1862. -- Skirmish at Atlee's Station, on the Virginia Central Railroad. Skirmish near Hanover Court-House.
Skirmish at Meadow Bridge, near Mechanicsville.
Battle of Mechanicsville, Beaver Dam Creek, or Ellison's Mill. Engagement at Point of Rocks, Appomattox River.
26-27, 1862. -- Skirmishes at Hundley's Corner.
July 2,1862. -- General Stoneman's operations, including destruction of stores at White House Landing.
27, 1862. -- Battle of Gaines' Mill, Cold Harbor, or the Chickahominy. Action at Garnett's Farm. Skirmish at Fair Oaks.
28, 1862. -- Action at Garnett's and Golding's Farms.
Skirmish at Dispatch Station, on Richmond and York River R. R. 29, 1862.
29, 1862. -- Engagement at Peach Orchard, or Allen's Farm, near Fair Oaks Station
Skirmish on the James River Road, near Willis' Church. Skirmish on the Williamsburg Road, near Fair Oaks Station.
Battle of Savage Station, on Richmond and York River Railroad.
Skirmish at Jordon's Ford.
30, 1862 -- Engagement at White Oak Swamp Bridge.
Action at Brackett's.
Battle of Glendale, Nelson's Farm, Charles City Cross-Roads, New Market Road, Frazier's Farm, or Willis' Church.
Engagement at Turkey Bridge, or Malvern Cliff. Skirmish near New Kent Court-House. Skirmish at Jones' Bridge.
July 1, 1862. -- Battle of Malvern Hill, or Crew's (or Poindexter's) Farm.
 
Joined
Jul 12, 2009
Location
Palm Beach, FL
Union materiel losses from Peninsula campaign

Hi CivilWarTalk,

I posted this under campfire Chat, but perhaps it is better posted here both in this thread and as a new post. Forgive me for cross-posting.

I know what the losses in manpower were during the Peninsula campaign. What were the materiel losses?

I am back to researching my talk on Civil War supply, after a month's leave to work on some other projects. I have not updated my website, but I will do so in the near future.

Thanks for your help,

Bob
 
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