Seeking help to identify unknown flag...

Joined
May 18, 2019
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31
#1
Hello Community!
I thought (hope) you might be able to shed some light on this flag I recently acquired at a local flea market. It’s not Civil War but I know Militaria collectors often have expertise in many different wars/eras.

I think it could be a WWI or WWII 29th Division flank marker flag or perhaps a marker flag for one their cavalry units (cavalry used the color yellow). I’ve never seen a wreath circling the yong-yang symbol and of course the division symbol is blue and gray not blue and yellow so I could be completely wrong!

Thank you either way!
Bart


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Joined
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251
#5
Hello Community!
I thought (hope) you might be able to shed some light on this flag I recently acquired at a local flea market. It’s not Civil War but I know Militaria collectors often have expertise in many different wars/eras.

I think it could be a WWI or WWII 29th Division flank marker flag or perhaps a marker flag for one their cavalry units (cavalry used the color yellow). I’ve never seen a wreath circling the yong-yang symbol and of course the division symbol is blue and gray not blue and yellow so I could be completely wrong!

Thank you either way!
Bart


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View attachment 311918
I actually concur with your conclusions as to it being a 29th Division Flag, though I suspect with the olive branches & the white square inside the yellow background that it is connected with the HQ of some high rank person in the division.
 
Joined
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251
#7
It strikes me as a Korean War era flag: Yin and Yang (Korea) inside UN wreath, although I wouldn't discount the possibility of it being a Chinese ancestral family or garden flag.
Yeah I think the key is whether the yin is yellow or gray, with the fading it is hard to tell.

I think you are onto something with the symbolism there being a cross between the UN & Korean flags. And the yin-yang does still look remarkably like early Korean flags as well.

So perhaps it’s origins lie in Korea after all. It strikes me as a one off flag, so we may never be able to say anything more than that...
 
Joined
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#8
I actually concur with your conclusions as to it being a 29th Division Flag, though I suspect with the olive branches & the white square inside the yellow background that it is connected with the HQ of some high rank person in the division.
Thank you for your input!
UN/Korea/China are all legitimate possibilities. I haven’t found any images online to support any of these or any association with the 29th. I thought that it may be US military because field made items deviated from standards because of limited materials and limited time.I’ve posted a couple examples. The shape, fabric, ties, all scream military to me but then again it could be wishful thinking!

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johan_steele

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#11
Thank you Johan! You solved the mystery!
We had one brought into the museum from a Vietnam vet who brought them back home as souvenirs from his time in Vietnam. He had one very similar and a RoK Marine flag as well as an Australian flag that he showed off. The difference was that his was all silk and had faded badly as well as having the white patch turned 45 degrees so it was shaped like a diamond. The wreath was little more ornate I think but don’t quote me on that.

I had thought he had donated them but was mistaken. He just brought them in to show off.
 

NH Civil War Gal

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#13
Thinking about "Unidentified Flags" - this got me thinking about my recent visit to the American Civil War Museum at Appomatox. I was a bit surprised that there are Civil War flags that can't be identified! I may have even posted a couple. The had them in drawers and on walls with a notice that said, "hasn't been identified yet." But.... they would have the tiniest bit of scrap under a special conservator glass and tell you which unit it came from!

So what are these "unidentified flags?" Did small groups in the CSA, from a small town make up their own flag sometimes? Would the Federal side have had the same problem?
 

Story

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#14
So what are these "unidentified flags?" Did small groups in the CSA, from a small town make up their own flag sometimes? Would the Federal side have had the same problem?
Yes, you'll see mention of the ladies from certain towns sewing up such and presentation ceremonies to departing units in articles (the half-dozen or so I'm remembering were from 1861). Newspapers.com is a good place to search.
 

johan_steele

Regimental Armorer
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#15
Thinking about "Unidentified Flags" - this got me thinking about my recent visit to the American Civil War Museum at Appomatox. I was a bit surprised that there are Civil War flags that can't be identified! I may have even posted a couple. The had them in drawers and on walls with a notice that said, "hasn't been identified yet." But.... they would have the tiniest bit of scrap under a special conservator glass and tell you which unit it came from!

So what are these "unidentified flags?" Did small groups in the CSA, from a small town make up their own flag sometimes? Would the Federal side have had the same problem?
Yes, it’s a common issue. Many towns gave flags to companies as they marched off to muster in or as they mustered out. There are also numerous GAR parade flags which can create confusion. Add in fraternal order flags that can be mistaken for Regimental flags and it gets real entertaining real fast for museums.

Much can be discovered from construction and materials but...
 

48th Miss.

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#16
Hello Community!
I thought (hope) you might be able to shed some light on this flag I recently acquired at a local flea market. It’s not Civil War but I know Militaria collectors often have expertise in many different wars/eras.

I think it could be a WWI or WWII 29th Division flank marker flag or perhaps a marker flag for one their cavalry units (cavalry used the color yellow). I’ve never seen a wreath circling the yong-yang symbol and of course the division symbol is blue and gray not blue and yellow so I could be completely wrong!

Thank you either way!
Bart


View attachment 311917

View attachment 311918
Seems UN flag dealing with Korea most likely
 

Story

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#17
In related news,

The Atlanta History Center announced last week its acquisition of a rare artifact key to the story of the Civil War, the regimental flag of the 127th United States Colored Troops (USCT). The flag is one of fewer than 25 known examples carried by African American regiments during the war.

Given the History Center’s ongoing mission of increasing inclusivity, the organization’s leadership viewed the chance to acquire the flag of an African American regiment as an important opportunity to expand its narrative about the often-forgotten service of the USCT during the Civil War. The History Center rarely makes major purchases for its collections, which have grown organically over nine decades mainly through donations of artifacts. However, on Thursday, June 13, 2019, the History Center purchased the flag for $196,800 ($160,000 hammer price, plus buyer’s premium), the most money the History Center has ever paid for a single artifact.


This is the only surviving example of 11 flags painted with similarly inspiring scenes by African American artist David Bustill Bowser (1820-1890). Bowser was a noted Philadelphia sign-painter, portraitist, and anti-slavery activist noted for his portraits of John Brown and President Abraham Lincoln.

For many years the 127th U.S.C.T. flag was housed at the Grand Army of the Republic Civil War Museum and Library in Philadelphia. Because much of the silk had deteriorated, the flag was carefully restored and framed. Nearly all other USCT flags are in institutional collections: The closest USCT flag to Atlanta is on display at the Maryland Historical Society in Baltimore; others are located in New York, Connecticut, Ohio, and Kansas.


https://www.charlestonchronicle.net...-more-comprehensive-history-of-the-civil-war/
 


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