Searching For Black Confedetates

Rhea Cole

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Nov 2, 2019
Location
Murfreesboro, Tennessee
Here s an example of non whites organized and fought for the confederacy. The Cherokee were not White. So the Confederate Regulations must not of had 100% enforcement. Confederacy was know for have more lack rules. Don’t think you can make a Cherokee White.

http://www.thomaslegion.net/
Of course, nobody said any of this had to make sense. The tribal customs meant that some men of African descent were full members & would have served alongside their family members. The whole thing was off the charts of the avowedly white supremacist reason for the CSA’s existence. Same with the B. C.(Black Confed.) crowd it would appear. Anyone not fitting the “plantation life was a slice of heaven on earth” cliche is conveniently left out.

I am astonished at the ignorance or deliberate blind eye the Black Confed. folks give to the one honest to goodness sure enough black unit actually in CSA service, the Louisiana Native Guard.The all more or less African decent regiment of New Orleans was the only African officered infantry actually mustered into CSA service… for a while anyways. Of course, as soon as Farragut took the city they switched sides. That hardly fits the willing to fight & die for ole massa theme so dear to the B. C. fantasy world. They shy away from the complexities of actual history.

The free men of color who did not tell white people what they wanted to hear after the war or were accepted members of tribes or were members of an actual infantry unit, etc. are way too complex for the Black Confed. narrative. Even men of African heritage who were slaveholders & thus could not fight for the right to hold their slaves are problematic.

That is the problem with delving honestly into the relationship between the CSA & the race that God created for them to enslave. It is really complex & up close it doesn’t make a lot of sense. I suppose that is why the B.C. argument is such a collection of worn out tropes. Actually studying the history is way too hard… the whole 19th Century race thing is very much a chameleon that changes color depending on the environment it finds itself in.
 
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Joined
Nov 15, 2019
Here s an example of non whites organized and fought for the confederacy. The Cherokee were not White. So the Confederate Regulations must not of had 100% enforcement. Confederacy was know for have more lack rules. Don’t think you can make a Cherokee White.

http://www.thomaslegion.net/
Stand Waite was 3/4 Cherokee and was the last Confederate general to surrender in 1865. His life story is quite interesting.
 
Joined
Nov 15, 2019
Just for the sake of accuracy let’s remember there was not a single black officered regiment in the entire Union Army either. The first black commissioned officer in the US Army was Henry Flipper in 1877.
 

OleMissCub

Private
Joined
Aug 30, 2021
bcgif.gif
 

Johnny_Reb_1865

Corporal
Joined
Nov 3, 2019
Not sure 100% but, these medals/records were issued before the UDC building in Richmond so they wouldn't necessarily have the application.They would possibly belong to the local Chapters or UCV Camps. The workings of the of the UDC has changed over the years. Different awards are given out at different levels and not everything gets sent to UDC General. The military service awards I just bestowed were at a Division level and had the approval of General but our Chapter has awards that we issue on our own.
Okay well maybe researching these names might find that at least one or two were of color?
 

Johnny_Reb_1865

Corporal
Joined
Nov 3, 2019
Show one.

Show any Confederate enlistment of a black man before 1865 as a soldier. Not as a cook or musician or any other servile auxiliary position, but as a soldier.
Screenshot_20210508-034422~01.png


You asked for one, here's one.

Not a musician, not a cook, not a teamster but a Private.
 

Rhea Cole

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Nov 2, 2019
Location
Murfreesboro, Tennessee
Farley enlisted in a Tennessee state regiment in July 1861. The regiment wasn't accepted into confederate service until October 1861, and Farley was absent.

I asked to see a confederate enlistment. In the confederate army.
The sad thing is that the actual history of Tennessee’s self liberated people is really interesting & very well documented. Prime amongst them is Jim Key from Shelbyville. He was NB Forrest’s groom. Key was famous for his skill with curing horses, people in this are called him Dr Key. He led his white nephews out of Fort Donelson with Forrest. After the war, Key became wealthy producing horse liniment, etc. He put his white nephews through Harvard.., sounds like the perfect B.C. story, right? Well… Key used the pass Forrest gave him to shepherd families of escaping slaves through CSA lines & to spy as well. Not the kind of ole massa & the plantation narrative were heavenly the B.C. Are looking for.

After the war, Jim Key & his horse of the same name were household names in America. His horse, was able to make change & spell out people’s names… no kidding. Look them up, The Beautiful Jim Key, the Smartest Horse in the World. There is a lot more to it than you would ever imagine.

A man I know was on PBS Antiques Roadshow with a steamer trunk filled with Jim Key documents. WNPT Nashville Public TV did a documentary on them that is available online. The book is excellent & still in print.

Jim Key is an example of a real person whose nuanced biography doesn’t have to be faked by twisting the definition of common words. Morgan Freeman has agreed to play Key in the movie.

Here we have a really fascinating true story… *Edited*
 
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Viper21

Brigadier General
Moderator
Silver Patron
Joined
Jul 4, 2016
Location
Rockbridge County, Virginia
Farley enlisted in a Tennessee state regiment in July 1861. The regiment wasn't accepted into confederate service until October 1861, and Farley was absent.

I asked to see a confederate enlistment. In the confederate army.
So what does this muster roll say, just under Co E 25th Tennessee Inf & just above Private...?
 

19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
Farley enlisted in a Tennessee state regiment in July 1861. The regiment wasn't accepted into confederate service until October 1861, and Farley was absent.
That is false.

Farley was mustered into Confederate service on October 1, 1861. He was absent on furlough. The roll for October 31 shows him to be present.

This information was transcribed from Confederate rolls - not state rolls-

farlejames1-jpg.jpg

farleyjames2-jpg.jpg



Here's the caption for the muster-in roll. A. B. Hardcastle is a Confederate mustering officer - not a state officer.

Unit Information (11).jpg
 
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DanSBHawk

Captain
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
That is false.

Farley was mustered into Confederate service on October 1, 1861. He was absent on furlough. The roll for October 31 shows him to be present.

This information was transcribed from Confederate rolls - not state rolls-

View attachment 418183
View attachment 418184


Here's the caption for the muster-in roll. A. B. Hardcastle is a Confederate mustering officer - not a state officer.

View attachment 418186
According to those cards, Farley enlisted for 3 months in a state unit. From July '61 to Oct '61. When the unit was mustered into confederate service in Oct '61, Farley was absent.

Is there any record of Farley rejoining the regiment? Is there any record of him serving as a confederate soldier?
 

DanSBHawk

Captain
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
Here is more info on the 25th Tennessee Infantry. It shows several that several free blacks enlisted in the state unit. But while many of the white soldiers have more information listed of serving through the war, it seems that none of the free blacks is shown as having a record after 1861. It also shows that many men in the regiment were discharged due to the Conscription Act, which among other things, required soldiers to be white males.

https://www.tngenes.net/index.php/military/rosters/231-25th-tennessee-infantry-regiment-csa
 
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19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
I am astonished at the ignorance or deliberate blind eye the Black Confed. folks give to the one honest to goodness sure enough black unit actually in CSA service, the Louisiana Native Guard.The all more or less African decent regiment of New Orleans was the only African officered infantry actually mustered into CSA service… for a while anyways. Of course, as soon as Farragut took the city they switched sides.
Only 108 out of 1,000 did (source: Louisiana Native Guards by Hollandsworth, p.18).
 

19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
Not sure 100% but, these medals/records were issued before the UDC building in Richmond so they wouldn't necessarily have the application.They would possibly belong to the local Chapters or UCV Camps. The workings of the of the UDC has changed over the years. Different awards are given out at different levels and not everything gets sent to UDC General. The military service awards I just bestowed were at a Division level and had the approval of General but our Chapter has awards that we issue on our own.
While researching a Confederate unit several years ago I found that a local UDC chapter had deposited their records at a public library. All sorts of records were there including Southern Cross applications.
 

19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
According to those cards, Farley enlisted for 3 months in a state unit. From July '61 to Oct '61. When the unit was mustered into confederate service in Oct '61, Farley was absent.

Is there any record of Farley rejoining the regiment? Is there any record of him serving as a confederate soldier?
"According to those cards, Farley enlisted for 3 months in a state unit."

Apparently, you are unable to read the card. It says "Period: 12 months."

Note "Confederate" on card. That means it's a Confederate roll-

Unit Information (12).jpg


The next existing roll for Company E after October 1861 was for November 1862. Farley's term of enlistment (12 months) ended before November 1862. He was no longer in the unit.

"Farley was absent."

Roll for October 31 says he is present.

"Is there any record of him serving as a confederate soldier?"

His name is on Confederate rolls. :unsure:
 
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AshleyMel

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Oct 26, 2016
While researching a Confederate unit several years ago I found that a local UDC chapter had deposited their records at a public library. All sorts of records were there including Southern Cross applications.
As I'm casually looking in to this that seems to be what I'm finding. Some Chapter records are also with local archives or historical societies. Some of the sponsoring Chapters are no longer in existence so this makes sense. I even found one list that was still in possession of family members along with other records and the family does not grant research requests, as is their prerogative.

I do think this would be a nice project to take on as time allows. Might be nice to clean up this thread and use it for posting on these men who received the Southern Cross of Honor.
 
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