Say What Saturday: Preserve the Union!

Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

luinrina

Sergeant Major
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Joined
Jul 30, 2018
Location
Germany
Butler_18-01-20.jpg

Before heading to the CWT muster in Vicksburg in October, I went to New Orleans for a couple of days. In preparation, I of course looked up what Civil War sites I could visit in the Crescent City. One place that came up in my research was Jackson Square in the French Quarter, especially the equestrian monument of Andrew Jackson.

The statue itself has nothing to do with the Civil War – Andrew Jackson victoriously led the American troops in the Battle of New Orleans in 1815, and to honor his deeds, a statue of Jackson was erected in 1856.

However, an inscription can be found on the statue’s pedestal that was added during the Civil War: The Union must and shall be preserved. Major General Benjamin Butler had had it inscribed when he occupied New Orleans in 1862. It was a reference to a toast made by Andrew Jackson during the nullification crisis in 1830 at a state dinner when Jackson served as the 7th President of the United States. His toast was: "Our Federal Union: It must be preserved!" To which Jackson’s Vice President, John C. Calhoun, responded with, "The union; next to our liberty the most dear; may we all remember that it can only be preserved by respecting the rights of the states and distributing equally the benefit and burden of the union." Jackson’s toast was important as he hadn’t given any indication until that point what he thought about nullification.

What I find especially interesting is that Jackson’s toast was inscribed on the base of an identical equestrian statue which was erected in 1853 in Washington D.C. It makes me wonder why it was left out in the New Orleans statue when it was cast from the same model three years later. Does anyone know why or have theories?


IMG_4256.JPG


IMG_4254.JPG


Sources:
- A Bloodless Victory: The Battle of New Orleans in History and Memory by Joseph F. Stoltz III
- neworleanshistorical.org
- Wikipedia
-
learningenglish.voanews.com
 

Ole Miss

1st Lieutenant
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Joined
Dec 9, 2017
Location
North Mississippi
@luinrina what great photos and you get bonus points for mentioning the Nullification Crisis in 1832-1833. South Carolina's refusal to enforce the federal tariff was a simple foretaste of the coming storm of 1816-1862, as it was the first time a state refused to enact federal law, unfortunately little known by many Americans today.
Regards
David
 

Bruce Vail

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Jul 8, 2015
Butler had an inscription added to the NO Jackson monument in 1862?

Old Ben Butler did have a perverse streak...
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Top