Say What Saturday: Beauregard Quote that Should Be Famous

lelliott19

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This sounds like a Beauregard quote that should have been immortalized, but it wasn't. In fact, other than being featured here at CivilWarTalk, the quote has only appeared in print once before <that I could find> - in the New York Times of November 19, 1862.

In November 1862, at Savannah, Georgia, Beauregard said, "But, my friends, I do not appear before you to-night to make a speech, and for several reasons -- first, It is a time for action, not speaking; and secondly, my throat has been been left in such a condition by recent illness, that the only way in which I can speak now is through the mouths of my cannon. Again thanking you for your cordial manifestations of your regard, I bid you, friends, good night." https://www.nytimes.com/1862/11/19/archives/a-speech-from-beauregard.html
 
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lelliott19

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He might have thought of something less pompous
Hmmmm. Interesting. I don't find his statement "pompous" at all. Unfortunately, I think it was probably how a lot of folks in the US must have felt at the time. Talk of secession had been ongoing since 1789 when the first compromise was made over assumption of States' debts and where to locate the US capital. And that threat to secede was made by the northern states -- as were subsequent ones. I think both sides were tired of "talking" and compromising. And that 'compromise weariness' was a factor in convincing others, less invested, to support the war effort. EDIT TO ADD: Now the 'more sensible' part of your statement.... I can definitely agree with you on that. :thumbsup:
 
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Rick Richter

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Hmmmm. Interesting. I don't find his statement "pompous" at all. Unfortunately, I think it was probably how a lot of folks in the US must have felt at the time. Talk of secession had been ongoing since 1789 when the first compromise was made over assumption of States' debts and where to locate the US capital. And that threat to secede was made by the northern states -- as were subsequent ones. I think both sides were tired of "talking" and compromising. And that 'compromise weariness' was a factor in convincing others, less invested, to support the war effort. EDIT TO ADD: Now the 'more sensible' part of your statement.... I can definitely agree with you on that. :thumbsup:

Not pompous, but it's certainly dramatic, and emblematic of both the times and Beauregard.
 

8thFlorida

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Great quote! Looks like he had a touch of the flu possibly considering the speech was in November. However seems a bit early for the flu in Savannah. We are more like these ancestors than we can imagine. And still fighting the same battles.
 

GwilymT

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Great quote! Looks like he had a touch of the flu possibly considering the speech was in November. However seems a bit early for the flu in Savannah. We are more like these ancestors than we can imagine. And still fighting the same battles.

We are very much like them in a lot of ways but fighting the same battles? I don’t want to misinterpret, could you clarify that part of your statement?
 

rdedmonds73

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Thanks to @lelliott19 and @Andy Cardinal We are kicking off a new weekend series! ~ Ami

View attachment 321279


This sounds like a Beauregard quote that should have been immortalized, but it wasn't. In fact, other than being featured here at CivilWarTalk, the quote has only appeared in print once before <that I could find> - in the New York Times of November 19, 1862.

In November 1862, at Savannah, Georgia, Beauregard said, "But, my friends, I do not appear before you to-night to make a speech, and for several reasons -- first, It is a time for action, not speaking; and secondly, my throat has been been left in such a condition by recent illness, that the only way in which I can speak now is through the mouths of my cannon. Again thanking you for your cordial manifestations of your regard, I bid you, friends, good night." https://www.nytimes.com/1862/11/19/archives/a-speech-from-beauregard.html
Love this.
 

John S. Carter

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Hmmmm. Interesting. I don't find his statement "pompous" at all. Unfortunately, I think it was probably how a lot of folks in the US must have felt at the time. Talk of secession had been ongoing since 1789 when the first compromise was made over assumption of States' debts and where to locate the US capital. And that threat to secede was made by the northern states -- as were subsequent ones. I think both sides were tired of "talking" and compromising. And that 'compromise weariness' was a factor in convincing others, less invested, to support the war effort. EDIT TO ADD: Now the 'more sensible' part of your statement.... I can definitely agree with you on that. :thumbsup:
If you are interested may I suggest this book;"HEIRS of the FOUNDERS",H.W. Brands.This book will reinforce your statement,Time is 1840 and the main issues which will determine the future coarse of the country as to expansion of slavery and the control of the political parties will be determine,For the next ten years three men will present the cases for and against the issue as the country tears at its seams.This is the final opportunity to prevent the tear that final happened after fifty years of threats from both three sides ,North/East.South.and West
 

John S. Carter

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Hmmmm. Interesting. I don't find his statement "pompous" at all. Unfortunately, I think it was probably how a lot of folks in the US must have felt at the time. Talk of secession had been ongoing since 1789 when the first compromise was made over assumption of States' debts and where to locate the US capital. And that threat to secede was made by the northern states -- as were subsequent ones. I think both sides were tired of "talking" and compromising. And that 'compromise weariness' was a factor in convincing others, less invested, to support the war effort. EDIT TO ADD: Now the 'more sensible' part of your statement.... I can definitely agree with you on that. :thumbsup:
'The Field of Blood,violence in Congress and the road to Civil War' . Joanne B.Freeman would be a interesting book for this issue.
 
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His words, but spoken by Gen. Pillow as he was unable to talk due to sore throat. Just in the trivia contest
Correct, and I forgot to add to my reply then a clip from the book "Medical histories of Confederate Generals" by D. J. Welsh. Therefore I will do it now, although I'm well aware that this thread is not so much about Beauregard's medical condition, but about his resolution. Anyway, he seems to have been quite adverse to cold and wet weather, something I can entirely relate to!
Here comes the clip:
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Lubliner

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And to think events happening in Savannah on Nov. 4 would be reprinted in the Times of New York by the 19th, makes me wonder about the display of attitude in the statement, (for posterity's sake, of course). Beauregard was a stickler for secrecy in military campaigning! He was also eloquent before the first battle at Manassas talking publicly how the hearthstones of the south were being trampled down by the north, and for all southerners to resist the northern scourge of their freedoms. So it is possible, he was adept at using the Press to gain self-acclaim without spilling any military secrets of consequence. Thanks @lelliott19.
Lubliner.
 
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