Say What Saturday: “Away down South in the land of traitors, rattlesnakes and alligators”

Biscoitos

Corporal
Joined
May 14, 2020
Interesting article but weren't rattlesnakes in the title? I can just imagine the shock of the Yankee Soldier's encounter with some of our reptiles.View attachment 399471
I bought a copy of this a couple of months ago.

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DBF

Sergeant Major
Joined
Aug 6, 2016
Interesting Book Title - my first thought was to wonder if the title referred to “real” snakes and serpents or “human” snakes and serpents. Sounds like it’s a little of both - maybe post a review?

I'm surprised no one mentioned Amos Moses.
Left thumb gone clean up to the elbow.
"Yeah, here comes Amos
Now Amos Moses was a Cajun
He lived by himself in the swamp
He hunted alligator for a living
He'd just knock them in the head with a stump
The Louisiana law gonna get you, Amos
It ain't legal hunting alligator down in the swamp, boy


Now the folks around south Louisiana
Said Amos was a h**l of a man
He could trap the biggest, the meanest alligator
And he'd just use one hand
That's all he got left 'cause an alligator bit it
Left arm gone clear up to the elbow.”

https://www.songfacts.com/lyrics/jerry-reed/amos-moses
 

Tom Hughes

First Sergeant
Joined
May 27, 2019
Location
Mississippi
Because I know lots of useless information :giggle: The University of Florida did a study on alligators about 40-years-ago and the reason they respond to marshmallows so readily is because they are slightly deficient in sugar in their bodies. There. Now you know as much as I do about alligators.:whistling:
So I shouldn't go swimming with a marshmallow life jacket on in alligator infested waters?
 

Biscoitos

Corporal
Joined
May 14, 2020
Interesting Book Title - my first thought was to wonder if the title referred to “real” snakes and serpents or “human” snakes and serpents. Sounds like it’s a little of both - maybe post a review?


"Yeah, here comes Amos
Now Amos Moses was a Cajun
He lived by himself in the swamp
He hunted alligator for a living
He'd just knock them in the head with a stump
The Louisiana law gonna get you, Amos
It ain't legal hunting alligator down in the swamp, boy


Now the folks around south Louisiana
Said Amos was a h**l of a man
He could trap the biggest, the meanest alligator
And he'd just use one hand
That's all he got left 'cause an alligator bit it
Left arm gone clear up to the elbow.”

https://www.songfacts.com/lyrics/jerry-reed/amos-moses
No prob.
The book is a total of 123 full size (8 X 11) pages and is softbound.
It includes an introduction and a chapter on snakes (reptiles) in early America, followed by five chapters (pages 16 – 56) containing stories of reptile encounters and references divided into the five geographical regions of the South, followed by a brief chapter on how snakebites were treated during the Civil War period.
The balance of the text, pages 60 to 110, is dedicated to the symbolism of snakes, and has 18 or so political cartoons from the Library of Congress. There is a chapter devoted entirely to Peace Democrats – Copperheads.
Sources are cited at the bottom of each page and the bibliography lists over 100 sources.
Overall, I personally thoroughly enjoyed reading all the snake stories, having had lots of encounters of my own, (but only bitten once.)
Considering the low cost of the book I feel it is worth buying
The book is available on paper ($15) and for Kindle ($6) on Amazon.
 
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