Tell me more! Rubberized Kepis?

Zack

First Sergeant
Joined
Aug 20, 2017
Location
Los Angeles, California
I saw an image of a rubberized kepi and wanted to know how common they were amongst the rank and file. Did anyone actually wear them? They seem really awful on a hot, sunny day. Not worth the rain protection. Were they like the havelock - issued early and thrown away fast? Any info appreciated!
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I first saw one when I was working as an extra on the set for the Kenosha Civil War Museum's film "Seeing the Elephant" (which is amazing btw if you're ever in Wisconsin). It was provided for one of the lead actors.
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major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
Aug 25, 2012
The rubber cap covers worn over the caps were not uncommon and you do see a few in photographs but soldiers probably did not often wear them when they went to have their photograph taken. It is my understanding that some early war companies wore caps made of oilcloth as well.
 

Package4

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Jul 28, 2015
I saw an image of a rubberized kepi and wanted to know how common they were amongst the rank and file. Did anyone actually wear them? They seem really awful on a hot, sunny day. Not worth the rain protection. Were they like the havelock - issued early and thrown away fast? Any info appreciated!
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I first saw one when I was working as an extra on the set for the Kenosha Civil War Museum's film "Seeing the Elephant" (which is amazing btw if you're ever in Wisconsin). It was provided for one of the lead actors.View attachment 393520
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Actually very common, though not an issue item. Keep in mind that when photographers took their pictures, they were in optimum conditions, for the most part, thus you do not see many showing up in the photos.

Officer’s purchased their own headgear and many included a cover, enlisted would purchase from a sutler or other outlet.

There were even tarred forage caps, I’ll post pictures of one I have as soon as I can find it.
 

Package4

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Jul 28, 2015
Found them, the first is a tarred forage cap made of cotton and tarred, it has a bound brim with a polished cotton lining and mimics the issue forage cap in all dimensional respects. The others are Southern cap covers, but would not differ much from what was procured by their Northern counterparts.

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James N.

Colonel
Forum Host
Annual Winner
Featured Book Reviewer
Asst. Regtl. Quartermaster Antietam 2021
Joined
Feb 23, 2013
Location
East Texas
Found them, the first is a tarred forage cap made of cotton and tarred, it has a bound brim with a polished cotton lining and mimics the issue forage cap in all dimensional respects. The others are Southern cap covers, but would not differ much from what was procured by their Northern counterparts.

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The tarred canvas covers continued into the postwar era, even for members of fraternal organizations, so collectors CAVEAT EMPTOR!
 

Package4

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Jul 28, 2015
I saw an image of a rubberized kepi and wanted to know how common they were amongst the rank and file. Did anyone actually wear them? They seem really awful on a hot, sunny day. Not worth the rain protection. Were they like the havelock - issued early and thrown away fast? Any info appreciated!
View attachment 393517

View attachment 393518

I first saw one when I was working as an extra on the set for the Kenosha Civil War Museum's film "Seeing the Elephant" (which is amazing btw if you're ever in Wisconsin). It was provided for one of the lead actors.View attachment 393520
View attachment 393521
I forgot to mention that the covers were not actually rubberized, but considered glazed or tarred cotton, similar to an US issue haversack.
 
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