Rick Reeves art

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#1
https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_fr...A0.H0.Xrick+re.TRS0&_nkw=rick+reeves&_sacat=0
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the bloody sixth - 6th MS at Shiloh TN 6 apr 1862





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Pickett's mill - texans of br gen Hiram Bronson Granbury vs lt col William Babcock Hazen bde - battle of Pickett’s mill GA 27 may 1864




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1862 Bull Run - Irish Brigade

At the Battle of First Manassas on July 21st, 1861, Captain Thomas Francis Meagher of the 69th New York State Militia had his horse shot from under him by an artillery projectile. Meagher, that day acting as major for the regiment, sprang to his feet and shouted, “Boys! look at that flag–remember Ireland and Fontenoy.” Meagher is shown with his sword in his hand just to the right of the flags. courtesy





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1862 09 17 Antietam., Run up the Elevation Screw and Give them Hell Boys

Brigadier General John Gibbon leaves his mount to assist the crew of Battery B, 4th U. S. Artillery. With most of the regular members of the battery either dead or wounded, the gun depicted here was manned by a 15-year-old Bugler, Private Johnny Cook, and 22-year-old Infantryman, Private William Hagerty, both of whom would receive the Medal of Honor for their valiant actions “above and beyond” on this day.Supporting the four regiments of Brigadier General John Gibbon’s “Iron Brigade,” who were spearheading the advance of Federal I Corps to open the Battle of Antietam, was Battery B, 4th U. S. Artillery. Ordered to unlimber west of Hagerstown Pike, the battery quickly lost half of its cannoneers to Confederate sharpshooters. At 6:30 a. m., on September 17, 1862, the 18th Georgia Infantry Regiment of Hood’s Texas Brigade launched a furious attack to overrun the battery. Supported by the 6th Wisconsin, the cannoneers fought desperately to save their guns. The acrid smell of gunpowder filled the air and the smoke was so heavy at times that the cannoneers could scarcely see their targets, as the Georgians advanced to within 15 yards of the guns. After assisting his wounded battery commander to the rear, Private Johnny Cook, the battery’s 15-year-old bugler, observed that nearly all the cannoneers were down in the battery. Picking up a pouch of ammunition, he moved to the guns and worked as a cannoneer for the remainder of the battle, at times working alone. One of the guns had been ordered to displace forward to the pike and engage the Confederates with cannister. The crew, now manned by inexperienced volunteers, was firing so rapidly that no one was aware that the elevating screw lowered with each round fired causing the gun’s missiles to pass harmlessly over the heads of the Confederates. Brigadier General Gibbon, who once commanded the battery, noticed what was happening and yelled to the crew to “run up the elevating screw.” Realizing his command could not be heard due to the din of battle, he jumped from his horse, rapidly ran up the elevating screw until the muzzle pointed almost to the ground and with a shout of “give ‘em hell, boys,” ordered the gunner to fire. The discharge carried away most of the fence to the front and produced great distruction in the Georgian ranks. The Georgians mounted three full-scale attacks to capture the battery and three times the cannoeers hurled them back. During the final lunge for the guns, Private William P. Hagerty, a 22-year-old infantryman-turned-cannoneer perceived through the stifling air one of the guns of the battery, at which all the crew had been killed or were disabled, standing idle and in a commanding position. He immediately seized a shrapnel round, cutting the fuse to explode as it left the muzzle, and alone and unaided fired it into the ranks of the Georgians. Afterwards, while awaiting orders, he picked up a musket and fought on as an infantryman. The enemy got so close to the battery that guns were double-shotted with canister which when fired caused whole ranks to go down. With ammunition almost expended and suffering severe casualties, the battery, along with the brigade withdrew to the rear. In this desperate 20-minute fight, Battery B suffered 52 percent casualites, the fourth highest casualty rate of any Federal battery in a single engagement, and lost 33 horses while inflicting 101 casualties on the 18th Georgia’s 176 effectives, or 58 percent. Also, for their heroic and distinguished actions during this short period of time both Privates Cook and Hagerty were later awarded the Medal of Honor.
 
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AUG

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#4
A few more of the Army of Tennessee:

Valiant Sons of Arkansas, Rick Reeves.jpg

Valiant Sons of Arkansas - 1st & 15th Arkansas Infantry consolidated, Govan's Arkansas Brigade, Cleburne's Division, 1864.

The Orphans, Rick Reeves.jpg

The Orphans - 6th Kentucky Infantry, Kentucky Orphan Brigade, 1864.

1st Tennessee Infantry, Rick Reeves.jpg

1st Tennessee Infantry (Maney's)

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Noble Daring - 7th Florida Infantry, Finley's Florida Brigade at the battle of Dallas, GA, May 28, 1864.

Key's Battery, Rick Reeves.jpg

Key's Arkansas Battery, 1864.
 
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AUG

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#8
I hope I'm not hijacking this thread.... can't help but post a few more :D

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The "Gen. Lee to the rear" incident with the Texas Brigade at the Wilderness, May 6, 1864.

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A Brigade Today--We'll Try a Corps Tomorrow.
Col. Emory Upton's charge on the Mule Shoe salient at Spotsylvania, May 10, 1864.

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Hazel Grove at Chancellorsville, May 3, 1863.
 

AUG

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#11
Gettysburg.jpg
Trust in God and do not fear anything.
Mortally wounded Confederate General Lewis Armistead of Pickett's Division asks Union Captain Henry Bingham to hand over his assets to his good friend, General Winfield Hancock. Gettysburg, July 3, 1863.

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The old flag never touched the earth.
The assault of the 54th Massachusetts at Fort Wagner, South Carolina, July 18, 1863.
 

Ole Miss

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#13
Fantastic prints! I appreciate your sharing these "beauties" with us. I am unaware of any photos of members of the 6th Mississippi but imagine they would have been very similar in appearance to this one taken of the 9th Mississippi. If so, the artist's depiction of the 6th's uniforms would be very idealized, am I correct?
Regards
David

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#14
Fantastic prints! I appreciate your sharing these "beauties" with us. I am unaware of any photos of members of the 6th Mississippi but imagine they would have been very similar in appearance to this one taken of the 9th Mississippi. If so, the artist's depiction of the 6th's uniforms would be very idealized, am I correct?
Regards
David

View attachment 297220
The photo of the 9th Mississippi was taken in Pensacola almost a year before Shiloh, so it is hard to use it as a guide. It appears the 6th Miss, along with other Miss units, drew Tenn 2nd pattern frocks from Nashville in early 1862, but there would be many commutation uniforms present. As for the uniform colors, I think they would have been a gray based upon photos I have seen of soldiers wearing the 2nd pattern, but butternut is still a strong possibility. As for the commutation uniform items, they could have run the color spectrum from drab to browns to grays to blues.

BTW, I've been exploring some other Miss units that have 1st pattern Tenn frocks and they appear blue or a dark gray.
 

AUG

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#15
Fantastic prints! I appreciate your sharing these "beauties" with us. I am unaware of any photos of members of the 6th Mississippi but imagine they would have been very similar in appearance to this one taken of the 9th Mississippi. If so, the artist's depiction of the 6th's uniforms would be very idealized, am I correct?
Regards
David

View attachment 297220
In that photo of the 9th MS I think it's likely they shed their uniform coats or jackets due to the heat and are wearing undershirts or overshirts, which would be typical camp wear. That or their overshirts could be part of an early war company uniform, although they appear to differ in style.
 

Ole Miss

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#16
@AUG you may well be right. but I seriously doubt the 6th looked anything like the way they are depicted in the print. I 2 soldiers wearing what appears to be calico pants but is not an important.

Mr. Reeves is an excellent artist and more knowledgeable about what soldiers wore than I am.:cry::cry:
Regards
David
 
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#18
Ref the 6th Miss at Shiloh, here is what Tom Arliskas, author of Cadet Gray and Butternut Brown, has to say about the uniforms at Shiloh:

What I have found, except for Bragg's Louisiana Troops coming up from New Orleans and Pensacola, and a few from Polk's garrison at Columbus who pulled a lot of Nashville frocks out of Memphis and Nashville, the CS troops, generally, were described as half-uniformed. Walnut dyed jeans the most viewed type of cloth used, especially for Tennesseans and Mid-South Confederates. Many again were described as in civilian clothes, a result of the Great Appeal drives that winter, where Grandma and the girls sent out ready made and homespun to the boys. Lots of civilian blouses and common hats. The troops at Shiloh were dressed more like the Confederates who served at Fort Donelson and were captured. I have some clothing requisitions for the 20th Tennessee, 8th, 10th, and 11th Louisiana and they were pulling Commutation donated clothing in December of 1861 and March of 1862 in Corinth. All of it different prices for the same item like pants, coats, and of course different weights, colors, cuts, and fabric.-- So any given CS Company would show up for Morning Call dressed in a medley of garments.
 
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#19
Fantastic prints! I appreciate your sharing these "beauties" with us. I am unaware of any photos of members of the 6th Mississippi but imagine they would have been very similar in appearance to this one taken of the 9th Mississippi. If so, the artist's depiction of the 6th's uniforms would be very idealized, am I correct?
Regards
David

View attachment 297220
The Falconer brothers and their father are in this photo. It's so early in the war, I doubt they had uniforms issues. They got their Enfields not long before Shiloh.
 



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