★ ★  Reynolds, John F.

John Fulton Reynolds

:us34stars:
Reynolds.jpg


Born: September 20, 1820

Birthplace: Lancaster, Pennsylvania

Father: John Reynolds 1787 – 1853
(Buried: Lancaster Cemetery, Lancaster, Pennsylvania)​

Mother: Lydia Moore Reynolds 1782 – 1857
(Buried: Lancaster Cemetery, Lancaster, Pennsylvania)​

Fiancé: Catherine Mary “Kate” Hewitt 1836 – 1876
(Buried: Pfordt Family Plot, Saint Agnes Cemetery, Menands, New York)​

Education:

1841: Graduated from West Point Military Academy - (26th in class)​

Occupation before War:

1841: Brevet 2nd Lt. In United States Army 3rd Artillery​
1841 – 1846: 2nd Lt. In United States Army, 3rd Artillery​
1841 – 1842: Garrison Duty at Fort McHenry, Maryland​
1842: Garrison Duty at Fort Pickens, Florida​
1842 – 1843: Garrison Duty at Fort Marion, Florida​
1843 – 1845: Garrison Duty at Fort Moultrie, South Carolina​
1845 – 1846: Served in the Military Occupation of Texas​
1846 – 1855: 1st Lt. In United States Army, 3rd Artillery​
1846: Served in the Defenses of Fort Brown, Texas​
1846: Served in the Battle of Monterrey, Mexico​
1847: Served in the Battle of Buena Vista, Mexico​
1848: Garrison Duty at Fort Trumbull, Connecticut​
1848 – 1850: Garrison Duty at Fort Preble, Maine​
1850 – 1852: Quartermaster for U.S. Army, 3rd Artillery​
1851 – 1852: Garrison Duty at Fort Adams, Rhode Island​
1852 – 1853: Aide to Major General David Twiggs​
1854: Garrison Duty in Lafayette, New York​
1854: Garrison Duty at Fort Wood, New York​
1854: Frontier Duty in Utah​
1854 – 1855: Frontier Duty in Salt Lake City, Utah
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1855: Frontier Duty at Fort Yuma, California​
1855: Frontier Duty at Benicia, California​
1855 – 1856: Frontier Duty at Fort Orford, Oregon​
1856: Served on the Rogue River Expedition​
1856 – 1858: Garrison Duty at Fort Monroe, Virginia​
1859: Served in the march to Columbia River​
1859 – 1860: Frontier Duty at Fort Vancouver, Washington​
1860 – 1861: Commandant of Cadets at West Point Military Academy​
1860 – 1861: Instructor of Artillery, Infantry, and Cavalry Tactics​

Civil War Career:

1861: Lt. Colonel of 14th United States Army, Infantry Regiment​
1861: Served with his regiment at Fort Trumbull, Connecticut​
1861 – 1862: Brigadier General of United States Volunteers​
1861 – 1862: Commander of Pennsylvania Reserve Corps in D.C.​
1862: Served in the Battle of Mechanicsville, Virginia​
1862: Served in the Battle of Gaines Mill, Virginia​
1862: Captured during the Battle of Glendale, Virginia​
1862: Prisoner of War from June 30th – August 8th
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1862: Division Commander Second Battle of Bull Run, Virginia​
1862: Commander of Pennsylvania State Militia in Maryland Campaign​
1862 – 1863: Commander of 1st Army Corps, Army of the Potomac​
1862: Corps Commander during Battle of Falmouth, Virginia​
1862 – 1863: Served in the Rappahannock, Virginia Campaign​
1862: Corps Commander during Battle of Fredericksburg, Virginia​
1863: Held in Reserve during the Battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia​
1863: Killed during the 1st day's Battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, rallying troops​

Died: July 1, 1863

Place of Death: Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

Age at time of Death: 42 years old

Cause of Death: Wounds to his head, behind the right ear

Burial Place: Lancaster Cemetery, Lancaster, Pennsylvania

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Joined
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Location
South Texas
He probably could have been the commander of the Army of the Potomac instead of Meade but placed demands on Lincoln about not having any strings from Washington attached . This is more than likely what helped Lincoln decide on Meade.
 

Luke Freet

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It was one of his divisions that made the only breech in ths Confederate lines at Fredricksburg. This division was under George Meade.
He probably could have been the commander of the Army of the Potomac instead of Meade but placed demands on Lincoln about not having any strings from Washington attached . This is more than likely what helped Lincoln decide on Meade.
Both commanders were initially part of the Pennsylvania Reserve Division. When General McCall fell at Mechanicsville, Meade commanded the division until Reynolds' return just before Second Manassas, here, Reynolds took command. Reynolds was detached by Governor Curtan during the Antietam Campaign to raise militia in case of an incursion by Lee, leaving command of the division in the hands of Meade. He then took command of the 1st Corps (as a Brigadier) at Fredericksburg. His old division under Meade made the breakthrough of A. P. Hill's line, overrunning Gregg's brigade. However, it was not properly supported (Reynolds had no clear orders from Franklin as to his role in the battle).
After the command shuffle after Hooker's accension to army command, Meade and Reynolds were promoted. Meade expected HE would get command of the 1st Corps, but this went to Reynolds instead, while he was moved to the 5th Corps.
 

rpkennedy

Lt. Colonel
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Carlisle, PA
There were a ton of Civil War generals in Reynolds' West Point class.

Zealous B. Tower 1
Horatio G. Wright 2
Amiel W. Whipple 5
Josiah Gorgas 6
Albion P. Howe 8
Nathaniel Lyon 11
Julius P. Gareshe 16
Samuel Jones 19
Joseph B. Plummer 22
John M. Brannan 23
Schuyler Hamilton 24
James Totten 25
John F. Reynolds 26
Robert S. Garnett 27
Richard S. Garnett 29
Claudius W. Sears 31
Don Carlos Buell 32
Alfred Sully 34
Israel B. Richardson 38
John M. Jones 39
William T.H. Brooks 46
Abraham Buford 51

Ryan
 

29thWisCoG

Corporal
Joined
Apr 12, 2021
I was just reading about his death from the Martin book... many claims as to who actually shot Reynolds but nobody exactly knows... one interesting tid is that he was wearing some type of a medallion around his neck when he fell, it was from Kate a local "lady friend"... I guess generals get lonely too
 

rpkennedy

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yeah, that was certainly a downgrade, given Doubleday's antics that afternoon. He was replaced in the last two days by Newton.
It was a downgrade in that Reynolds was a very able officer and Doubleday was a competent but unspectacular general. That said, July 1 was probably Doubleday's finest day of the war and he very capably commanded the First Corps that afternoon and helped rally the survivors on Cemetery Hill.

The reason that he was relieved by Meade and replaced by John Newton (Doubleday had seniority) was because Meade and Doubleday did not like one another. When Howard falsely blamed the collapse of the Federal defenses on Doubleday and the First Corps, it gave Meade the excuse that he needed to take the corps away from Doubleday.

Ryan
 

Irishtom29

2nd Lieutenant
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Jul 21, 2008
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Kent, Washington
Brown's book on Meade at Gettysburg raises the possibility that Meade's intention was for Reynolds to engage the enemy and then withdraw south towards Emmitsburg, in which case Doubleday buggered up by remaining on Seminary Ridge when he could've sithdrawn. And if so in hindsight Reynolds was lax if he didn't make an intention to fight and then withdraw perfectly clear to Doubleday and Howard. If so.
 

rpkennedy

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Brown's book on Meade at Gettysburg raises the possibility that Meade's intention was for Reynolds to engage the enemy and then withdraw south towards Emmitsburg, in which case Doubleday buggered up by remaining on Seminary Ridge when he could've sithdrawn. And if so in hindsight Reynolds was lax if he didn't make an intention to fight and then withdraw perfectly clear to Doubleday and Howard. If so.

Honestly, I don't think that Meade had any solid intentions on July 1. The evidence indicates that he was leaving himself open to react to whatever situation arose. While he had planned on defending the Pipe Creek line, he was never married to that concept.

As for Reynolds, I have trouble seeing him having any solid plans either. When he arrived, he moved to deploy Wadsworth's Division between Seminary and McPherson's Ridge. Plus, he had sent word back that he was planning on defending the town and potentially barricading some of the roads into Gettysburg. It's an interesting theory but I just don't see the evidence for him planning on drawing Lee south towards Emmitsburg. But, of course, he was shot in the opening moments of the First Corps' fight so who knows what he would have done had he survived?

Ryan
 

RochesterBill

Corporal
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Oct 11, 2016
It was a downgrade in that Reynolds was a very able officer and Doubleday was a competent but unspectacular general. That said, July 1 was probably Doubleday's finest day of the war and he very capably commanded the First Corps that afternoon and helped rally the survivors on Cemetery Hill.

The reason that he was relieved by Meade and replaced by John Newton (Doubleday had seniority) was because Meade and Doubleday did not like one another. When Howard falsely blamed the collapse of the Federal defenses on Doubleday and the First Corps, it gave Meade the excuse that he needed to take the corps away from Doubleday.

Ryan

This bears repeating.

Doubleday has been unfairly criticized over the years to the point that it has become gospel.

In reality it very much appears that.most of the blame for.mistakes made that afternoon should fall to Howard, who had Meades ear and got him to accept his version of events.

I think John Buford made the point when, after Reynolds went down leaving Howard in command of the field he sent an urgent message to Meade: " For Gods sake send up Hancock"
 
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LoyaltyOfDogs

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Location
Gettysburg area
There is a biography by Charles P. Roland titled Toward Gettysburg: A Biography of John F. Reynolds No. 186. What does the No. 186 mean?
Glad to see this, @Polloco. I've been curious whether anyone had published a biography of Reynolds. I have no idea what the No. 186 refers to. And I have an additional question. Searching just now, I see other online references to this same author and book, but on a university library's site (and on the site of my favorite online bookstore, BetterWorldBooks.com) a book by the same title is attributed to an author named Edward J. Nichols. Is there a different book by Roland about Reynolds? Thanks!
 
Joined
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When he was captured in Boatswain's Swamp he was brought before D.H.Hill by his capturers. Hill, who was an old Army buddy and friend tried to ease Reynolds' embarrassment . Hill allegedly told Reynolds "Reynolds, do not feel so bad about your capture, it is the fate of wars." Reynolds was imprisoned in Libby Prison and later exchanged for Lloyd Tilghman.
 
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