NY Rensselaerville Cemetery

lupaglupa

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The National Park Service database lists him as

Fish, William​

Side:Union Unit Name:17 New York Infantry Regiment:17 State:New York Function:Infantry Company:H Rank:tongue:rivate Description:Buried in National Cemetery Capture Date: Capture Site: Alternate Name: Remarks:H 10 NY [1]; H 17 NY INFANTRY [3]; NOT FOUND IN 10 NY INFANTRY [63] OR 17 NY INFANTRY [64]

Since there is some confusion, apparently, about what he regiment was (different sources say different things), I'm inclined to think that this is the brother of Lester. The records are only as good as the handwriting of the person writing them and the interpretive abilities of the person reading them.

I'll dig a bit and get back to you, but an April death is consistent with the 270 grave number.
I just wish there were some record of his enlistment!
 

lupaglupa

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George VanWie, 1844-1865, a private in Company K of the 7th New York Heavy Artillery Regiment. George enlisted in Rensselaerville August 18, 1862. He was single and worked as a wagonmaker. George was captured at Petersburg June 14, 1864 and imprisoned at Andersonville and Millen, Georgia. He was exchanged in November of 1864 but his imprisonment had weakened him. He died in the General Hospital at Annapolis, Maryland January 5, 1865 from, as the record noted, "the effects of starvation and exposure."
 

lupaglupa

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Three sides of the monument in the Rensselaerville Cemetery contain names of those from the town who died in service. Some also have tombstones in the cemetery. The men are listed by regiment.

91st New York Infantry Regiment

Charles Bouton, 1830-1862 as a private. Charles enlisted in Rensselaerville, his home town, in November of 1861. He was married and had two children. Soon after being mustered in he was promoted to corporal and transferred from Company E to Company K. He died of an unspecified disease at Key West, April 26, 1862.

David Bouton, 1837-1862, a private. Born in Rensselaerville, he enlisted there in November of 1861. Originally in Company E he was transferred to Company K. Charles died at Key West April 28, 1862 of typhoid fever.

Charles F. Bouton, 1847-1862. He enlisted in November of 1861 in Rensselaerville as a private in Company C. He died at Pensacola July 29, 1862.

Charles F. and David Bouton were brothers. Charles Bouton was their first cousin and George Bouton, profiled in post #4, was their second cousin.

William Doty, 1838-1865. Born across the Hudson in Stephentown, New York, William enlisted as a private in Company E at Albany in September of 1864. He was a farmer who lived in the small community of Preston Hollow in the town of Rensselaerville. He died at the Camden Street Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland March 8, 1865. The cause of death was given as spotted fever, spinal meningitis, and epileptic fits.

177th New York Infantry Regiment

Milton Jones, 1843-1863, a private in Company C. He enlisted at Rensselaerville in October of 1862 for a nine-month term. He was a farmer. Milton died of typhoid at Bonnet Carre, Louisiana July 10, 1863.

Lorenzo Whitting, 1842-1863, a private in Company I. A native of Schoharie County, New York, he enlisted at Rensselaerville in October of 1862. He was employed as a farmer and bartender. He returned home in September of 1863, having served his term, but almost immediately became ill and died. It was determined that he had contracted the fever that killed while in the army and, as he had not mustered out, he was listed as dying in service. He is buried in Preston Hollow where his family lived.

A third man from the 177th is on the monument, though he was mistakenly listed with the men from the 7th New York Heavy Artillery Regiment.

John Greene, 1832-?. Born in Greene County, just south of Rensselaerville, John Greene enlisted in the 177th as a substitute from an unnamed man from Broome County, New York. His official records states that he enlisted at Rensselaerville in October of 1862 and deserted in December of 1862. But the notes made by the town clerk in Rensselaerville say John was taken prisoner with three others at Culpepper, Virginia. As the 177th left New York for New Orleans December 16, 1862 and served their entire term in Louisiana, it is hard to imagine how this may have occurred. The town clerk further notes "supposed to be living." John was married when he enlisted but I could find no record of his wife. How he ended up on the monument I don't know.

44th New York Infantry Regiment

George W. Schemerhorn, 1839-1861, mustered in as a fifer. He enlisted in August of 1861 in Albany for a term of three years. He died of measles that November at the Kalorama Hospital in Washington, DC and is buried there.

25th New York Infantry Regiment

George Swarthout, 1844-1863, a private in Company D. He enlisted at Rensselaerville in October of 1862. George worked as a shoemaker and was married with no children. He died of typhoid fever March 7, 1863 at Falmouth, Virginia and is buried there.
 

bdtex

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Since @John Winn is here. Earlier in the thread, the effects of acid rain on some of the stones in that cemetery was mentioned and it's pretty visible on some of them. We don't see that much in Texas. We see more of the effects of humidity and organic matter here in southeast and central Texas. Maybe John can comment on that.
 

John Winn

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Since @John Winn is here. Earlier in the thread, the effects of acid rain on some of the stones in that cemetery was mentioned and it's pretty visible on some of them. We don't see that much in Texas. We see more of the effects of humidity and organic matter here in southeast and central Texas. Maybe John can comment on that.
Well, there's not a lot to say other than it is common, especially the closer the stones are to an urban area. Water from sprayers can also be acidic or deposit minerals and that happens. Conifer tree needles are very acidic so if a stone is underneath such - and is something basic like limestone or marble - it'll get stained and eroded over time.

While acid rain is particularly destructive to marble, lichen and moss can also so a lot of damage over the decades as the attachment fibers (not technically roots) get deep into the pores and produce acidic compounds as well as exert hydraulic pressure. Such can also retain moisture which, if in a place where freezing occurs often, can cause surface flaking as said moisture freezes.

This is one reason I support findagrave and try to post photos as those can serve to document what, in time, may become very difficult to read or just disappear altogether. I've also done work with our historical society and genealogical society to document these things.
 

lupaglupa

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Well, there's not a lot to say other than it is common, especially the closer the stones are to an urban area. Water from sprayers can also be acidic or deposit minerals and that happens. Conifer tree needles are very acidic so if a stone is underneath such - and is something basic like limestone or marble - it'll get stained and eroded over time.

While acid rain is particularly destructive to marble, lichen and moss can also so a lot of damage over the decades as the attachment fibers (not technically roots) get deep into the pores and produce acidic compounds as well as exert hydraulic pressure. Such can also retain moisture which, if in a place where freezing occurs often, can cause surface flaking as said moisture freezes.

This is one reason I support findagrave and try to post photos as those can serve to document what, in time, may become very difficult to read or just disappear altogether. I've also done work with our historical society and genealogical society to document these things.
Upstate New York is ground zero for acid rain. We are in the wind stream from all the midwestern factories. As you say though, it's not all stones that are affected. The old slate stones hold up well. There are quite a few Revolutionary War veterans whose tombstones are more legible than those from the Civil War.
 

lupaglupa

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One side of the monument is dedicated to men who died serving in the 7th New York Heavy Artillery Regiment. Seven of those have not been profiled already -

Charles Swaine Evans, 1840-1864. Charles was a single man working as a shoemaker when he enlisted in Rensselaerville July 12, 1862. Born in the village, he had recently been working in Deerpark, Orange County, New York. He seems to have been a talented soldier; he enlisted as a private and rose through the ranks to 2nd lieutenant. At the Battle of Cold Harbor he was getting "refreshments" for the men when he was picked off by a Confederate sharpshooter, June 3, 1863. He died of his wounds two days later in the hospital.

Edward Slater, 1838-1865. At 27, Edward was older than many recruits and enlisted in Rensselaerville as a sergeant in August of 1862. Single, he made his living as a carpenter. He was serving as Quartermaster Sergeant when he was captured June 16, 1864 at the Battle of Petersburg. He was transported to Andersonville where he died of scorbutus (scurvy) January 27, 1865. He is buried at the National Cemetery at Andersonville in grave number 12534.

John Rider, 1827-1864. John was born in Durham, New York, just south of Rensselaerville. At the time he enlisted in August of 1862 he was living in Rensselaerville with his wife and three children, working as a day laborer. John was promoted from private to Ordinance Sergeant soon after enlisting. He was wounded at the Battle of Petersburg June 16, 1864 and soon after captured. Taken to a Confederate hospital in Lynchburg, Virginia, he died of his wounds there July 16th.

Jonathan J. Russell, 1840-1864. Jonathan was a single farmer who lived in the tiny community of Potters Hollow. He enlisted at Rensselaerville in August of 1862 - either as a private or as a corporal, the records state both. He was captured at the Battle of Cold Harbor June 16, 1864 and transferred to the prison at Andersonville. He died there from diarrhea September 15th, 1864, and is buried in grave number 8856.

Andrew H. Fenton, 1835-1864. Born in New York City, Andrew was a working as a farmer when he enlisted in Rensselaerville in August of 1862 as a private. He was captured at Cold Harbor June 3, 1864 and died in an unnamed Confederate hospital June 16, 1864 of wounds received in battle.

Isaac E. Finch, 1843-1864. Isaac declared himself a farmer when he enlisted in Rensselaerville in August of 1862, though in the 1860 U.S. Census his occupation had been listed as teacher. Born in Rensselaerville, he was single and one of seven children. He was killed May 30, 1864 at the Battle of Totopotomoy Creek and buried in a now unknown location on or near the battlefield.

Levi Smith, 1841-1864. Levi was single and a farmer when he enlisted in Albany August 11, 1862. Born in the small hamlet of Potters Hollow, he was assigned to Company I and then transferred to Company F. He was captured during the Petersburg Campaign (various locations are given) and taken to the prison at Andersonville. He died there from diarrhea September 28, 1864 and is buried in the National Cemetery in grave number 9973.
 

lupaglupa

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The last panel on the monument contains more regiments, including two men who enlisted outside of New York State.

5th New York Heavy Artillery Regiment

Silas M. White, 1845-1862. Silas, a single farmer, enlisted in February of 1862 in the hamlet of Preston Hollow, his homeplace. He was a private in Company I. He died that year on Christmas Day in Baltimore, Maryland at a Regimental Hospital from measles. He is buried in the cemetery at Preston Hollow.

3rd New York Cavalry Regiment

Peter Rafferty, 1836-?. Peter, born in Ireland, enlisted in Albany in September of 1861 as a private in Company B. The official record shows he deserted after only three days and was never heard from again. But the Town Clerk's records state "taken prisoner at Gettysburg died a prisoner in Rebel hands don't know where buried." The contrast between these claims may be explained by a second enlistment record. A Peter Rafferty enlisted in October of 1861 at Oak Hill, a small village just a few miles south of Rensselaerville, in the 5th New York Cavalry Regiment. This Peter, who was promoted to sergeant, was captured at Hagerstown as the Confederates retreated from Gettysburg. He was taken to Andersonville and died there of dysentery June 6, 1864. He is buried at the National Cemetery in grave number 2534.

Are these two Peters one and the same? I could find no record for either that overlapped - that this is one man is entirely possible. Certainly the folks in Rensselaerville believed that Peter died honorably during the War.

118th New York Infantry Regiment

Phillip Miller, 1835-1864. Phillip was born in Columbia County, New York and enlisted at Plattsburgh, New York. But his home was Rensselaerville for most of his life and his family lived there before, during, and after the War. He enlisted in Company H as a private in August of 1862. He was promoted to corporal, then sergeant; the rank he held when he was killed in the Battle at Drewry's Bluff, Virginia, May 16, 1864.

1st New York Engineer Regiment

Charles W. Greene, 1843-1862. Though the monument states 15th New York, Charles actually enlisted in the 1st New York at Athens, a Hudson River town not far from Rensselaerville, in September of 1861. He had been born in Athens and worked there as a clerk until not long before the War began, when he moved to the small hamlet of Preston Hollow to work as a merchant. He died in the hospital at Hilton Head, South Carolina February 2, 1862 and is buried there. A cenotaph was erected by his family in their plot in Athens.

61st New York Infantry Regiment

John F. West, 1845-1862. Though he declared himself to be a 21-year-old farmer, John was 17 when he enlisted as a private in September of 1862. He died three months later, December 26, 1862, of an unspecified disease. He is buried in his hometown of Berne, New York, just north of Rensselaerville.

21st Illinois Infantry Regiment

Charles West, 1841-1864. Charles, brother to John F. West (above), was living in Elkhart, Illinois and working as a farmer when he enlisted as a private in June of 1861. Assigned to Company C, he was discharged with an unnamed disability in February of 1864. He returned home to Rensselaerville, where he died of a disease contracted while in service June 22, 1864. He is buried at Berne, New York next to his brother.

127th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment

Edwin Crandall, 1841-1862. Edwin enlisted at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania August 4, 1862. He said he was born in Delaware County, New York and worked as a laborer in West Fairview, a village just across the Susquehanna River from Harrisburg. He was wounded at the Battle of Fredericksburg December 13, 1862 and died of his wounds ten days later. He is buried at Fredericksburg. But how did Edwin get to Harrisburg? New York records show that one Edwin Crandall, born 1841, enlisted at Oak Hill (just south of Rensselaerville) in the 5th New York Cavalry Regiment in October of 1861. He deserted at New Market, Virginia the following May. Is this the same man? Did he begin a journey home, only to stop and reenlist? Records don't support the idea that there are two men so it seems that Edwin did serve desert - a fact overlooked by his hometown when his failure was redeemed by his later service and death.
 
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