Remington 1858 or 1861

Joined
Nov 13, 2015
Messages
1
#1
Looking for an old Civil War Gun. I'm not sure how to verify, if the gun would
have been used in the Civil War. I'm looking at a few 1858's and 1861 Remington
Army Revolvers. Would I be correct to think - - - the 1958 Remington would have
been issued earlier in the war, and would be a "good" chance it was used in battle
vs. the 1961 Remington Army?
 

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Joined
May 29, 2017
Messages
146
Location
Pe Ell, Washington
#2
Looking for an old Civil War Gun. I'm not sure how to verify, if the gun would have been used in the Civil War. I'm looking at a few 1858's and 1861 Remington
Army Revolvers. Would I be correct to think - - - the 1858 Remington would have
been issued earlier in the war, and would be a "good" chance it was used in battle
vs. the 1961 Remington Army?
First off, the so-called 1858 Remington NMA replicas were named as such because of the Elisha Root Patent Date of 1858 on the originals.

The Remington New Model Army .44 (and the sister Navy .36) were not produced until 1863, so there is no chance that it was produced before the CW.

Secondly, there is no such thing as a Remington 1861 pistol. Colt produced an 1861 Navy .36 that looked similar to the 1860 Army .44 on a smaller frame and is a favorite with some folks.

Instead of spending your money on an original that you have no knowledge about, I would suggest you procure an Italian replica and familiarize yourself with the originals by looking up the history of these guns.

I don't wish to be snarky, but you have a bit to learn. I have been there and done that.

Any folks on this forum that may chime in are usually well educated.

Jim
 

CWDF

Private
Joined
Jan 16, 2009
Messages
155
Location
Pennsylvania
#3
The original Model 1858 Remington is known as the Beals-Remington because Fordyce Beals held the patent. It has a short “web” under the loading lever and the frame covers the threads where the barrel is screwed into the frame.
Remington M1858.jpg
It was revised in 1861 and Beals’ name was dropped (it is sometimes referred to by collectors and curators as the second model or “Old Model”). It has a longer “web” under the loading lever and the frame covers the threads where the barrel is screwed into the frame.
Remington M1861.jpg
It was revised again in 1863 and was advertised at the time as the “New Model”). It has the longer “web” under the loading lever and the threads of the barrel are visible where the barrel is screwed into the frame. I am not too familiar with reproductions but most I have seen are this model and unfortunately they show up at early war reenactments.
Remington M1863.jpg
All three models were made in .36 caliber (Navy) and .44 caliber (Army).

Hope this helps in identification.

Larry Keener-Farley
 
Joined
May 1, 2015
Messages
7,875
Location
Upstate N.Y.
#5
Welcome, enjoy. I concur with the other members. Before purchasing a "Civil War" firearm you need to arm yourself with a few good books . Read all you can find and search websites, look at what is offered for sale on auction ( not to say that is all correct), museums or at gun shows. Once you feel you are somewhat familiar then is time to go either reproduction or study some more if you wish to obtain originals. Talk to people that own and don't be afraid to ask (no such thing as a stupid question). Members here will be more the willing to try and answer or point you in the correct direction.
 

WJC

Brigadier General
Moderator
Joined
Aug 16, 2015
Messages
10,670
#6
Looking for an old Civil War Gun. I'm not sure how to verify, if the gun would
have been used in the Civil War. I'm looking at a few 1858's and 1861 Remington
Army Revolvers. Would I be correct to think - - - the 1958 Remington would have
been issued earlier in the war, and would be a "good" chance it was used in battle
vs. the 1961 Remington Army?
Why do you want it? As a display piece? As a sidearm in reenacting? To do some black powder 'plinking'?
Depending on your plans, you might, indeed, be better off with a good reproduction rather than a more expensive original piece.
In any event, as others have suggested, take some time to learn about the pistol and- if possible- see some in museums or gun shows.
And don't be afraid to ask questions. Even the very top experts started just like you....
 
Joined
Jun 30, 2017
Messages
207
Location
France (The Alps...not Paris !)
#7
I used to fire a Remington 1858 and a Colt Navy 1851 (from Italian maker Pietta), these guns were good ones in their time, they are beautiful pieces to see in a USCW artifact collection, and of course can be used for re-enactors...but for "cap and ball" shooting...they can be dangerous, even if used with great safety.
I quitted black powder shooting for this reason , I once was firing with the Remington 58, maybe didn't I use enough powder...but the bullet was still in the barrel after the coup , I could have fired again just after , and surely blow up the gun and also my hand.
 
Joined
Jun 30, 2017
Messages
207
Location
France (The Alps...not Paris !)
#8
Another hard part in "cap and ball" shooting, is the cleaning of the guns after each session, it's an indispensable part of the process...if they're not cleaned properly they get oxidized because of the action of the black powder.
 


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