Remember May 22, 1863

Vicksburger

First Sergeant
Joined
Dec 16, 2011
Location
Saint Joseph
We are coming up on the anniversary of Grant's massive assault against the Vicksburg fortifications, all of which were a smashing defeat and bloodbath. Grant never could defeat Pemberton when he was defending behind prepared fortifications. Pemberton planned to advance and cut Grant's supply line, while Johnston attacked from the direction of Jackson. But Johnston peremptorily ordered Pemberton to come out from his prepared works near Edwards Station and link up with him north of Edwards, which is when Grant struck Pemberton's army as it tried to move north, near Champion Hill. Thus the retreat back to the Vicksburg fortifications, and the stage set for May 19 and 22 assaults, both bloody failures for Grant. My gggreat uncles fought at the 2nd Texas Lunette, one was killed May 22, the other endured the 47 day siege, unsurpassed for heroism and devotion to duty. Neither lived to marry, have a family, and so on, so I honor their sacrifice this way.
I like the quote from Thomason, on the Texas monument: (if I can remember it correctly)

"For these men believed in something. They considered life a light thing to lay down in the faith they bore. They were terrible in battle. They were generous in victory. They rose up from defeat to fight again, and while they lived, they were formidable."

3199 casualties on that one day (Federal), Confederate casualties do not exceed 500.
 

Vicksburger

First Sergeant
Joined
Dec 16, 2011
Location
Saint Joseph
We are coming up on the anniversary of Grant's massive assault against the Vicksburg fortifications, all of which were a smashing defeat and bloodbath. Grant never could defeat Pemberton when he was defending behind prepared fortifications. Pemberton planned to advance and cut Grant's supply line, while Johnston attacked from the direction of Jackson. But Johnston peremptorily ordered Pemberton to come out from his prepared works near Edwards Station and link up with him north of Edwards, which is when Grant struck Pemberton's army as it tried to move north, near Champion Hill. Thus the retreat back to the Vicksburg fortifications, and the stage set for May 19 and 22 assaults, both bloody failures for Grant. My gggreat uncles fought at the 2nd Texas Lunette, one was killed May 22, the other endured the 47 day siege, unsurpassed for heroism and devotion to duty. Neither lived to marry, have a family, and so on, so I honor their sacrifice this way.
I like the quote from Thomason, on the Texas monument: (if I can remember it correctly)

"For these men believed in something. They considered life a light thing to lay down in the faith they bore. They were terrible in battle. They were generous in victory. They rose up from defeat to fight again, and while they lived, they were formidable."

3199 casualties on that one day (Federal), Confederate casualties do not exceed 500.
I'm bumping this thread in honor of the anniversary of Grant's attack of May 22 which was thoroughly REPULSED by the Confederates. Lets remember these brave men tomorrow at 10:00 am, the time designated by Grant for the general attack along all the lines at Vicksburg. Can you imagine what that was like? (The sounds of the artillery firing could be heard by the Ninth Texas Cavalry, as they headed for Vicksburg to help out, when they heard it the guide told them they were yet 100 miles from Vicksburg.)
 

AUG

Major
Retired Moderator
Joined
Nov 20, 2012
Location
Texas
I'll bump this up a second time Vicksburger. The 2nd Texas Infantry and Waul's Texas Legion had a hell of a fight on this day!

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AndyHall

Colonel
Joined
Dec 13, 2011
The 2nd Texas Infantry and Waul's Texas Legion had a hell of a fight on this day!

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The Second Texas was commanded by Ashbel Smith, a well-known physician here in Galveston before and after the war. The Second Texas, when reorganized after parole and exchange, ended the war as garrison troops here. The oldest building on the University of Texas Medical School campus here is named in his honor:

Ashbel_Smith_Building_UTMB_Galveston.jpg
 

huskerblitz

Major
Joined
Jun 8, 2013
Location
Nebraska
Sgt. Major John T. Harrington of the 22nd Kentucky was killed in this contest. He wrote a pretty detailed account of Chickasaw Bayou, stating "I Have Seen War in all Its Horrors" before his own death from similar wounds he detailed.
 

DanSBHawk

Captain
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
I'd have to add a tribute as well to the bravery of the union troops that made the assault. And to the brilliant campaign they fought to get to the works of Vicksburg. Total confederate troops in Mississippi out-numbered the US troops, and yet Grant and the union troops were ultimately successful. It was a remarkable achievement.
 

Allie

Captain
Joined
Dec 17, 2014
"For these men believed in something. They considered life a light thing to lay down in the faith they bore. "

What did they believe in? What did they think they were fighting for?
I think those are reasonable questions. In the immediate event, most probably were fighting for their loyalty to their fellow soldiers. In the larger sense, the answers are probably all over the map.

I didn't see this post when it came around before. I see my cousin, Colonel William J. Landram, in blue on the map!
 

Vicksburger

First Sergeant
Joined
Dec 16, 2011
Location
Saint Joseph
I think those are reasonable questions. In the immediate event, most probably were fighting for their loyalty to their fellow soldiers. In the larger sense, the answers are probably all over the map.

I didn't see this post when it came around before. I see my cousin, Colonel William J. Landram, in blue on the map!
That is cool you are related to Col. Landrum! Do you have any interesting family stories about him/ from him? He was definitely brave when he attacked the RR Redoubt.
 

Allie

Captain
Joined
Dec 17, 2014
That is cool you are related to Col. Landrum! Do you have any interesting family stories about him/ from him? He was definitely brave when he attacked the RR Redoubt.
Oh, he's a fifth cousin, no stories sadly. But interesting as an example of the many different things members of a single family did during the war. Most Landrums spelled it with the u - apparently Colonel Landrum spelled it both ways - and lived in the South. The family originated in Virginia. John Gill Landrum was a delegate to the secession convention of South Carolina (he voted for secession). Thomas S. Landrum was Captain of a company of Unionist guerrillas in Jones county, Mississippi. My Landrum ancestor from Georgia was Captain of a cavalry company before being detailed as a physician, and his brother was the only minister in Savannah to successfully navigate the pitfalls of politics and keep his church open throughout the entire war and occupation by both armies. On the Union side, George Washington Landrum from Ohio was a courier for Rosecrans who died at the battle of Chickamauga - a cenotaph with his name marks the exact spot today. It's fascinating to me that the descendants of a single person ended up filling so many different roles on both sides.
 

Vicksburger

First Sergeant
Joined
Dec 16, 2011
Location
Saint Joseph
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Posting some of my pictures from my 2012 visit to Vicksburg, wishing I was there! I don't know why it is printing them twice. Anyway, in honor of the anniversary of the May 22 assault and repulse. As Ed Bearss says about this event: " As the sun sets in the western horizon, 3199 Yankees are killed wounded or missing...Champion Hill avenged!"
 
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