Discussion Reluctant Rebs & "Homegrown Yanks": East Tennesseans in the Civil War

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http://politicalstrangenames.blogspot.com/
https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Strangest-Names-In-American-Political-History/131941583590341

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corum acuff.png

Paternal Grandfather of Roy Acuff was a "home-grown" east Tennessee Yankee.

Coram Acuff...Enlisted & mustered on 7/26/1862 as a Private, into "D" Co. TN 1st Infantry, Union Volunteers, later transferred to Company A, 18 years old. He was Mustered Out on 7/21/1865 at Knoxville, TN. His brothers, William P. & James S. may have served in the Confederate army. He was the paternal grandfather of Roy Acuff, "The King Of Country Music."

Goodspeed's "BIOGRAPHY OF UNION COUNTY, TENNESSEE (1887)" - "Hon. Coram Acuff, a lawyer, was born in Grainger County August 23, 1846, the son of Simeon and Susan, (Strange) Acuff... He served in Company D, First Tennessee Federal Infantry... [In 1874] he was elected county court clerk of Union County and was twice re-elected, serving twelve years. In 1886 he was admitted to the bar, having read and learned of the law during his clerkship. He was a representative of two counties in the Legislature in 1887-88." According to family historian Judd Acuff, Coram, while a Representative in the Tennessee General Assembly in 1887-1889, was the first former Federal soldier in the Tennessee Legislature who voted in favor of pensions for Confederate veterans. Coram also served as Union County Clerk from 1896-1910......provided by L. K. Perry
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USS ALASKA

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Joined
Mar 16, 2016
East Tennessee State University
Digital Commons @ East
Tennessee State University
Electronic Theses and Dissertations Student Works
8-2008

Internal Dissent: East Tennessee's Civil War, 1849-1865.
by Meredith Anne Grant

East Tennessee State University
This Thesis - Open Access is brought to you for free and open access by the Student Works at Digital Commons @ East Tennessee State University. It has been accepted for inclusion in Electronic Theses and Dissertations by an authorized administrator of Digital Commons @ East Tennessee State University. For more information, please contact [email protected].

ABSTRACT
East Tennessee, though historically regarded as a Unionist monolith, was politically and ideologically divided during the Civil War. The entrance of the East Tennessee and Virginia and East Tennessee and Georgia railroads connected the economically isolated region to Virginia and the deep South. This trade network created a southern subculture within East Tennessee. These divisions had deepened and resulted by the Civil War in guerilla warfare throughout the region. East Tennessee’s response to the sectional crisis and the Civil War was varied within the region itself. Analyzing railroad records, manuscript collections, census data, and period newspapers demonstrates that three subdivisions existed within East Tennessee – Northeast Tennessee, Knox County, and Southeast Tennessee. These subregions help explain East Tennessee’s varied responses to sectional and internal strife. East Tennessee, much like the nation as a whole, was internally divided throughout the Civil War era.

https://dc.etsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3314&context=etd
21842

I hope this is a positive addition to your thread, sir...
USS ALASKA
 

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Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
East Tennessee State University
Digital Commons @ East
Tennessee State University
Electronic Theses and Dissertations Student Works
8-2008

Internal Dissent: East Tennessee's Civil War, 1849-1865.
by Meredith Anne Grant

East Tennessee State University
This Thesis - Open Access is brought to you for free and open access by the Student Works at Digital Commons @ East Tennessee State University. It has been accepted for inclusion in Electronic Theses and Dissertations by an authorized administrator of Digital Commons @ East Tennessee State University. For more information, please contact [email protected].

ABSTRACT
East Tennessee, though historically regarded as a Unionist monolith, was politically and ideologically divided during the Civil War. The entrance of the East Tennessee and Virginia and East Tennessee and Georgia railroads connected the economically isolated region to Virginia and the deep South. This trade network created a southern subculture within East Tennessee. These divisions had deepened and resulted by the Civil War in guerilla warfare throughout the region. East Tennessee’s response to the sectional crisis and the Civil War was varied within the region itself. Analyzing railroad records, manuscript collections, census data, and period newspapers demonstrates that three subdivisions existed within East Tennessee – Northeast Tennessee, Knox County, and Southeast Tennessee. These subregions help explain East Tennessee’s varied responses to sectional and internal strife. East Tennessee, much like the nation as a whole, was internally divided throughout the Civil War era.

https://dc.etsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3314&context=etd
21842

I hope this is a positive addition to your thread, sir...
USS ALASKA
Wow !!! Many Thanks !!!
 

USS ALASKA

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Mar 16, 2016
East Tennessee State University
Digital Commons @ East
Tennessee State University
Electronic Theses and Dissertations Student Works
5-2016

“Mere Supplicants at the Gate”: Northeast Tennessee Politics in the Antebellum Era
by O.J. Early

East Tennessee State University
This Thesis - Open Access is brought to you for free and open access by the Student Works at Digital Commons @ East Tennessee State University. It has been accepted for inclusion in Electronic Theses and Dissertations by an authorized administrator of Digital Commons @ East Tennessee State University. For more information, please contact [email protected].

ABSTRACT
Antebellum political historians have long studied the era between Andrew Jackson’s election and the secession crisis through the colored knowledge of the Civil War. This project is an effort to reverse that trend. It explores northeast Tennessee’s political culture from the late 1830s through the start of the Civil War. It reveals that the Second American Party System, a wave of new enfranchised voters, and the area’s demographics mixed together to lay a foundation for the aggressive and populist political style that permeated the region from the 1830s through the 1850s. At the heart of these issues was the transition of power from East Tennessee to Middle Tennessee. As a way to analyze the region’s political culture, I look specifically at Democrats Andrew Johnson and Landon Carter Haynes and Whigs William Brownlow and Thomas Nelson.

https://dc.etsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4456&context=etd
21991

Cheers,
USS ALASKA
 

Attachments

Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
East Tennessee State University
Digital Commons @ East
Tennessee State University
Electronic Theses and Dissertations Student Works
5-2016

“Mere Supplicants at the Gate”: Northeast Tennessee Politics in the Antebellum Era
by O.J. Early

East Tennessee State University
This Thesis - Open Access is brought to you for free and open access by the Student Works at Digital Commons @ East Tennessee State University. It has been accepted for inclusion in Electronic Theses and Dissertations by an authorized administrator of Digital Commons @ East Tennessee State University. For more information, please contact [email protected].

ABSTRACT
Antebellum political historians have long studied the era between Andrew Jackson’s election and the secession crisis through the colored knowledge of the Civil War. This project is an effort to reverse that trend. It explores northeast Tennessee’s political culture from the late 1830s through the start of the Civil War. It reveals that the Second American Party System, a wave of new enfranchised voters, and the area’s demographics mixed together to lay a foundation for the aggressive and populist political style that permeated the region from the 1830s through the 1850s. At the heart of these issues was the transition of power from East Tennessee to Middle Tennessee. As a way to analyze the region’s political culture, I look specifically at Democrats Andrew Johnson and Landon Carter Haynes and Whigs William Brownlow and Thomas Nelson.

https://dc.etsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4456&context=etd
21991

Cheers,
USS ALASKA
Another great addition! Thank you!!!
 
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http://tngenweb.org/civilwar/5th-tennessee-volunteer-infantry-regiment/

Fifth Infantry
TENNESSEE UNION VOLUNTEERS
(3-YEARS)

Fifth Infantry. -- Col. James T. Shelley, Lieut.-Cols.,
Fremortin Young, Charles C. McCaleb, Nat Witt; Majs., Joseph
D. Turner, David G. Bowers.

This regiment was organized at Barboursville, Ky., by Col.
Shelley, of Roane county, Tenn., in March, 1862. As a part of
Spear's brigade it participated in the operations around
Cumberland Gap during the summer of 1862, also in the retreat
from that place, and subsequently in the battle of Stone's
River.

It was present at Chickamauga, and took an active part in the
battle of Missionary Ridge. In the Georgia campaign it formed
a part of Manson's brigade, and with the remainder of the 23rd
corps returned to fight Hood before Nashville.

It was mustered out by companies at different dates from March
29 to June 30, 1865, by reason of expiration of term of
service.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 4, p. 380

*******************************************************************************

Report of Col. James T. Shelley, Fifth Tennessee Infantry,
of operations May 14.

CAMP IN FIELD, June 14, 1864.
I have just received your note, and contents noted. I beg leave to
report the following facts concerning the Resaca battle:

We (the Second Brigade) were ordered at between 10 and 11 o'clock
to advance through an open field, which we did, and drove the
enemy from their first line of rifle-pits, where we engaged the enemy
for three hours and forty minutes, when we were relieved by the
Fourth Army Corps. I lost in killed, 16 men; wounded, 92; commissioned
officers, 6; missing, 14; total, 128.

Respectfully,

JAS. T. SHELLEY,
Col. Fifth Tennessee Volunteers.

Lieut. C. D. RHODES,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen., Second Brigade.

P. S.--A great many of the wounded here reported have since
died from their wounds from want of attention, as I am told.

JAS. T. SHELLEY.

Source: Official Records
PAGE 732-73 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHAP. L.
[Series I. Vol. 38. Part II, Reports. Serial No. 73.]


********************************************************************************

Nashville, TN after battle report:

No. 140.

Report of Maj. David G. Bowers, Fifth Tennessee Infantry, of operations
November 22-30, 1864.

HDQRS. FIFTH Regt. EAST TENNESSEE VOL. INFTY.,
Nashville, Tenn., December 5, 1864.
SIR: In compliance with circular just received, bearing date of the present
instant, I respectfully submit the following report of the operations of the
Fifth Regt. Tennessee Volunteers, viz:

On the 22d of November, at daylight, I received orders to march, and took
up the line of march from Pulaski, on the Columbia pike, and arrived at
Lynnville at 11 a.m., a distance of twelve miles from Pulaski. At Lynnville
we went into camp, and remained quiet until 1 p.m. November 23, at which
time I received orders from Gen. Cox to report to Col. Casement,
commanding Second Brigade, Third Division, and at the brigade, and
marched until 7 p.m., and then went into camp, having marched a distance
of eleven miles. I received orders to be ready to march at 5 o'clock on the
morning of the 24th, and took up the line of march at daylight toward
Columbia. We arrived at Columbia at 10
a. m. same day, having gone eight miles, and took position to the south of
the town, and received orders to construct works of defense. At 2 p.m. I
moved to the right and to the southwest of the town, and took position in line
of battle, my right resting near the Mount Pleasant pike, and facing to the
south. We there constructed a line of breast-works and sent out skirmishers,
who engaged the enemy. We remained in that position until 7 p.m. on the
25th, when we received orders to be ready to move at a moment's notice.
About 11 p.m. we moved slowly through the town, and crossed the Duck
River; moved up the river half a mile, and rested for the night. Capt.
Sparks and thirty men were on picket, and did not cross the river until the
morning of the 27th. On the 26th one man of Sparks' detail was wounded.
On the morning of the 26th we moved in position, and there remained until
the 29th. At 7 p.m. on the 29th we were ordered into line, and marched out
half a mile on the Franklin pike, and took position behind earth-works to the
left of the pike. We remained there half an hour, and then took up the line
of march for Franklin. We arrived at Franklin at 5 a.m. on the morning of
the 30th, having marched twenty-three miles during the night. Capt. Ragle,
Company K, and thirty men, brought up the rear of the brigade from
Columbia, and arrived at Franklin about 9 a.m., having lost one man, who,
from fatigue, was left by the way, and probably fell into the hands of the
enemy. On the night of the 29th our wagons were attacked by the enemy,
and one of them burned or destroyed, containing regimental baggage. Part
of our baggage, which was sent to Pulaski, by instructions from Col.
Henderson, for want of transportation, was destroyed on the 23d, including
part of the regimental and company books and papers.

I am, sir, very respectfully,

DAVID G. BOWERS,
Maj., Cmdg. Fifth Tennessee Volunteer Infantry.

Capt. C. D. RHODES,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen.

Source: Official Records
CHAP. LVII.] CAMPAIGN IN NORTH ALA. AND MIDDLE TENN. PAGE 428-93
[Series I. Vol. 45. Part I, Reports, Correspondence, Etc. Serial No. 93.]
.....................................................................................................................

Report of Col. James T. Shelley, Fifth Tennessee Infantry, of operations May 14.
CAMP IN FIELD, June 14, 1864.
I have just received your note, and contents noted. I beg leave to report the following facts concerning the Resaca battle:

We (the Second Brigade) were ordered at between 10 and 11 o'clock to advance through an open field, which we did, and drove the enemy from their first line of rifle-pits, where we engaged the enemy for three hours and forty minutes, when we were relieved by the Fourth Army Corps. I lost in killed, 16 men; wounded, 92; commissioned officers, 6; missing, 14; total, 128.
Respectfully,
JAS. T. SHELLEY,
Colonel Fifth Tennessee Volunteers.

Lieut. C. D. RHODES,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Second Brigade.

P.S. A great many of the wounded here reported have since died from their wounds from want of attention, as I am told.
JAS. T. SHELLEY.

-from The war of the rebellion: a compilation of the official records of the Union and Confederate armies. ; Series 1 - Volume 38 (Part II) page 732.
 
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Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
thomas jackson pelfrey.jpg


Thomas Jackson Pelfrey: 25 years old when he enlisted on 11/1/1862 as a Sergeant into "D" Co. TN 5th Infantry Union Volunteers. Intra Regimental Company Transfers into companies, D, K & I. Fought at Spring Hill, Franklin, and Nashville, as well as participated in the Carolina's Campaign. He was born in Madisonville, Monroe County, Tennessee, but lived most of his life in Rhea County. Described as 6' 2 1/2" dark complexion, yellow eyes. He was Mustered Out on 6/30/1865 at Nashville, TN. Died on April 14, 1912 (the same day the Titanic went down).

His Pension Application
thomas j pelfrey.jpg
 
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CCMDCSA

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May 20, 2018
Location
Silver run Md carroll county
My fourth great grandfather, Lewis Shaw, was from Jonesborough, Tennessee. He served with company D of the 8th Tennessee Volunteer Calvary. I've researched his service records and was finally able to find his grave site. It was not easy at first, due to his name being misspelled.

I then happened upon a significant document. It is from his pension file with the United States National Archives. It is a handwritten letter from one Captain George McPherson, commanding officer of Company D, 8th Regiment of the Tennessee Volunteer Calvary. His written words leave little doubt as to this being Lewis Shaw's final resting place. This document came about due to my 4th great-grandmother having to hire lawyers out of Knoxville, Tennessee. She had to sue the federal government for her husband's pension. All because his name had been misspelled.

I petitioned the Veterans Administration to replace his headstone. I just want a proper memoriam befitting the sacrifices made by this man. He fought in the Mexican-American War with Co.L, of the 5th Tennessee Volunteer Infantry Regiment and was disabled due to his service. Although disabled, he volunteered to be a scout with the 8th Regiment of the Tennessee Volunteer Calvary in 1864. He was captured in Morristown, Tennessee and died in captivity in the Confederate prison in Danville, Virginia.

Another letter that I came across from Captain George McPherson, described Lewis Shaw as "an uncompromising Union man." This was not a very popular stature to have in the mountains of upper East Tennessee at the time. In fact, he had to hide out in the woods for a long period of time, due to his neighbors persecuting him for his beliefs. A true Tennessee Volunteer and devout American.

Lewis Shaw enlisted in the Union Army (Company D, 8th Tenn Cav) in September, 1863. Went missing in action at Morristown, TN on or about Nov. 13, 1864. Was captured by Confederate forces of Major Gen. Breckenridge and later confined in the Confederate POW prison in Danville, VA. Was admitted to the prison hospital in Danville, VA. Dec. 21, 1864 and died there on feb. 26, 1865.

Has anyone had any experience with the VA replacing a headstone? Also, any information anyone has on the 8th Tennessee Volunteer Calvary would be greatly appreciated.

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Great pictures
 

madisonman

Private
Joined
Mar 3, 2019
Location
Western North Carolina
My fourth great grandfather, Lewis Shaw, was from Jonesborough, Tennessee. He served with company D of the 8th Tennessee Volunteer Calvary. I've researched his service records and was finally able to find his grave site. It was not easy at first, due to his name being misspelled.

I then happened upon a significant document. It is from his pension file with the United States National Archives. It is a handwritten letter from one Captain George McPherson, commanding officer of Company D, 8th Regiment of the Tennessee Volunteer Calvary. His written words leave little doubt as to this being Lewis Shaw's final resting place. This document came about due to my 4th great-grandmother having to hire lawyers out of Knoxville, Tennessee. She had to sue the federal government for her husband's pension. All because his name had been misspelled.

I petitioned the Veterans Administration to replace his headstone. I just want a proper memoriam befitting the sacrifices made by this man. He fought in the Mexican-American War with Co.L, of the 5th Tennessee Volunteer Infantry Regiment and was disabled due to his service. Although disabled, he volunteered to be a scout with the 8th Regiment of the Tennessee Volunteer Calvary in 1864. He was captured in Morristown, Tennessee and died in captivity in the Confederate prison in Danville, Virginia.

Another letter that I came across from Captain George McPherson, described Lewis Shaw as "an uncompromising Union man." This was not a very popular stature to have in the mountains of upper East Tennessee at the time. In fact, he had to hide out in the woods for a long period of time, due to his neighbors persecuting him for his beliefs. A true Tennessee Volunteer and devout American.

Lewis Shaw enlisted in the Union Army (Company D, 8th Tenn Cav) in September, 1863. Went missing in action at Morristown, TN on or about Nov. 13, 1864. Was captured by Confederate forces of Major Gen. Breckenridge and later confined in the Confederate POW prison in Danville, VA. Was admitted to the prison hospital in Danville, VA. Dec. 21, 1864 and died there on feb. 26, 1865.

Has anyone had any experience with the VA replacing a headstone? Also, any information anyone has on the 8th Tennessee Volunteer Calvary would be greatly appreciated.

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Hello COUSIN Bruce Miller! Hope you're still on here. I just now saw your above post. Lewis Shaw was also my ancestor (2nd Great Grandfather)! I researched him years ago, and on my first trip to Danville, I did not find his grave (not looking for a SHOW). Second trip found him. I contacted the government folks about getting a replacement stone for him, but they would not approve it. Thanks to CCMDCSA for responding to your post - otherwise, I would never have seen it. So, Bruce Miller, if you're still out there - lets get in touch!
 
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Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
Thanks go out to @lelliott19 for transcribing the Dr.'s application.

Carter County in upper East Tennessee was predominantly Union during the Civil War. It was the home of Daniel Ellis, well known to Confederates as "the Old Red Fox" that piloted numbers of Union men across the mountains into Kentucky and the Federal Army. But there were a few folks with southern sympathies.

One was physician Green Turner Magee. In July following the end of the war, Dr.Magee applied to the new U.S.President, East Tennessean Andrew Johnson for a pardon for being sympathetic to the Confederate cause.

Elizabethton, Tennessee
July 15, 1865

To His Excellency Andrew Johnson
President of the United States
Your petitioner Green T Magee a citizen of Carter County Tennessee respectfully represents to your Excellency that he has been a consistent Rebel in his feelings and sentiments since the beginning of the late civil war, but has never been connected in any way with the rebel service nor held any civil appointment under either Government. He is by profession, is a Physician and during the entire war has remained quietly at home in the practice of Medicine, visiting and attending upon Union and Southern citizens without distinction. He has never been arbitrary in his treatment of Union citizens, but he used all proper efforts in their behalf in the way of saving them from arrest and securing their property from seizure -- He would cheerfully have availed himself of the benefits of your Excellency's general Proclamation of Amnesty, but is excluded therefrom by reason of a Presentment now pending against him in the Circuit Court of the United States at Knoxville for aiding and abetting the Rebellion. He has taken and subscribed to the oath required by said instrument which is herewith shown as evidence of his desire to return again to his true allegiance.

Petitioner, therefore, prays your Excellency to grant him a special pardon for his past offenses thus enabling him again to become a loyal citizen which he has for a long time past greatly desired.
Very respectfully
G. T. Magee

john k miller.jpg

COLONEL OF THE 13TH
A number of citizens along with the Colonel, Assistant Surgeon, and Captain Samuel Scott of Company G Union 13th Tennessee Cavalry endorsed his application."....We therefore respectfully recommend that your Excellency grant him a special pardon for his nominal connection with the Rebellion, fully believing that he will henceforth be a true & loyal man in his support of the Government." The 13th TN was the Union regiment credited with killing John Hunt Morgan. Mostly made up of East Tennessee exiles, many of their families were persecuted in their absence, and showing mercy to Rebels was not their usual fare. The good doctor was no doubt well thought of.
dr. james cameron.jpg

DR JAMES CAMERON, ASSISTANT SURGEON

b.p. stacy samuel w scott & s.p. angel.jpg

CAPTAIN OF COMPANY G, SAMUEL W. SCOTT STANDS IN THE CENTER. HE AND S.P. ANGEL PUBLISHED A HISTORY OF THE 13TH IN 1902.

The 1860 census of Carter County, Tennessee shows Dr.Magee living with his mother, Priscilla Land in household # 1. North Carolina is given as their birth State. I may well be related, but I fail to find them anywhere in the 1850 census.
 
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Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
East Tennessee In The Official Records

Oct. 6, 1864, Series I, Volume 39.

john crawford vaughn.jpg


Brig. Gen. J. C. Vaughn, Commanding,

General: The 2 flags captured* from the Eighth and Ninth Federal Tennessee Cavalry have been received, together with the communication accompanying them. The major-general commanding desires you to convey to your command his thanks for the gallantry displayed in the action in which they wore captured, and his special acknowledgments of the single valor and daring of Privates Samuel H. Selvidge, Company C, Third Tennessee. Regiment, and Charles Dent, Company B, Sixteenth Tennessee Battalion, in securing the enemy's colors. The flags will be forwarded with the statements sent by you appended, and they will be recommended for promotion. I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. STODDARD JOHNSTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

J. Stoddard Johnston.jpg


J. STODDARD JOHNSTON, Assistant Adjutant-General: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/7429203/josiah-stoddard-johnston

samuel hiram selvidge.jpg


Samuel Hiram Selvidge Company C Third Tennessee (Lillard's or Vaughn's) Mounted Infantry: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/7176149/samuel-hiram-selvidge

Company C was from Polk County, TN. Samuel enlisted 5/16/1861 at Benton, Tennessee. He was paroled at the surrender of Vicksburg. Promoted to Third Sergeant for capturing the Flag of the 9th TN Federal Cavalry. He was part of a mass exodus of Confederate East Tennesseans following the war. He settled in Texas where his widow applied for a pension on April 21, 1931. Samuel married Mrs. S. H. Selvidge on February 21, 1901, in Tarrant County, Texas and Samuel died on April 15, 1918, in the County of Tarrant, Texas.

The application also stated the following: 1. Mrs. S. H. Selvidge was a resident of Texas and Tarrant County since 1884. 2. Her address was 2803 Azle Road, North Ft. Worth, Texas. 3. Samuel neither applied for a pension nor did he draw a pension. 4. Samuel lived in Benton, Tennessee at the time of his enlistment. 5. Samuel's command was originally organized in Tennesse. 6. Samuel served for 4 Years in Company C. 3rd Regiment. George H. Sheppard, Comptroller of State of Texas, sent a letter to the Adjutant General, War Department, Washington, D. C. on April 22, 1931, requesting the military record of Samuel H. Selvidge, "C" Regiment 3rd Tennessee Infantry. Major General C. H. Bridges, The Adjutant General responded with a letter dated April 28, 1931, and was received by Mr. Sheppard on May 2, 1931. The letter stated that Samuel was a Private in Company C, 3rd (Lillard's) Regiment Tennessee Mounted Infantry Confederate States Army, enlisted May 15, 1861, at Benton, Tennessee and was promoted to Sergent but the date of promotion was not recorded. Also, Samuel was a prisoner of war and was paroled on July 10, 1863, at Vicksburg, Mississippi "according to the terms of capitulation entered into by the commanding Generals of the United States and Confederate forces July 4, 1863."The muster roll for January 1 - June 30, 1864 (the last roll on file) showed Samuel present. Samuel's name also appeared on a receipt roll for clothing issued September 20, 1864.

Selvidge captures a flag.jpg



Private Charles I. Dent (z) Company B 16th TN (Neal's) Cavalry Battalion. Appears only on a roll dated May 1,- Dec.31, 1864. Captured the flag of the 8th TN Federal Cavalry. Captured and paroled at Greenville, NC. May 23, 1865.

dent captures a flag.jpg


 
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d.m.key.jpg


On May 25, 1865, David M. Key, former Confederate Lieutenant Colonel of the 43rd Tennessee Infantry wrote his pre-war friend, and fellow East Tennessean, Andrew Johnson, now President of the United States, seeking Johnson's assistance in getting his life back in order after the Confederacy's defeat. Key and his family were living basically "in exile" with a relative of his wife in Caldwell County, NC when he wrote:

"It has been a long while since I have had any communication with you. We have been friends and in times past I have given you my humble and zealous support. The melancholy events of the past few years have separated us; still, I trust they have left in their track no personal bitterness between us. You have been triumphant, I have fallen. I am completely conquered. I hope that for the sake of the past, at least, you will pardon me for addressing you and asking your advice and assistance in matters surely affecting me and mine. I shall give you a candid history of my conduct during and connection with the rebellion as well as a statement of my conditions and wishes.

I was not an original secessionist but when the State of Tennessee went for separation, I felt bound by the action of my State and joined the provisional army of the State soon after her ordinance of separation as it was called. I was subsequently elected Lieutenant Colonel of the 43rd Regiment Tennessee Volunteers and was stationed in East Tennessee until the summer of 1862. During the time I was in East Tennessee, I always respected the feelings, persons, and property of the Union citizens, never was the cause an instrument of the arrest, imprisonment, or persecution of one of theirs, but on the contrary, I often labored and sometimes with effect for the release of those who were arrested, among many others, I can mention Stephen Bears, John Mcpherson, and old man Munsey of Bradley County whom I was instrumental in having released. I tried hard to get Levi Trewhitt Esq released but failed. If you have ever heard your friends in East Tennessee speak of me at all, I am sure they had no charge of inhumanity or oppression to bring against me.

From East Tennessee, I went to Kentucky with my Regiment in Bragg and Kirby Smith's invasion of that State. On coming out of Kentucky I was sent with my command to Vicksburg, Mississippi in the winter of 1862, and on the 4th of July 1863 was captured there, but that campaign ruined my health, and not being able for duty, I resigned my commission of Lieutenant Colonel and have had no commission with the civil or military service since.

Indeed, my health is completely shattered and I have been fit for nothing since. I resided as you know, at Chattanooga, Tennessee. I owned a well-furnished house there, but my family being unable to remain there in my absence, left there in the summer of 1861. What has become of my house and furniture since Chattanooga fell into the hands of the Federals, I know not?

After I was paroled at Vicksburg and came back to Tennessee, I came here with my family because I thought that in this climate my health might be bettered, and we would be removed from the annoyances and turmoil of all armies, but now that the struggle is ended, and I find my little all gone, it behooves me to look to the support of my family. I prefer to return to the practice of the legal profession, and in my old field of operations, if I can be permitted to do so, but I am in utter ignorance of what sort of penalties or disabilities I may labor under, and I write to you to ascertain wither I may return and assume the practice of my profession, of course, I should like to be reinstated in my property, but I would not ask you to depart from your line of dutty in my favor.

I expect to b a faithful and loyal citizen of the Federal Government fully obedient to its laws and Consitution and to discharge all my duties and obligations to that Government. Now that we have failed in the strife I would not prolong it, or any bad spirit resulting from it, but feel anxious that entire harmony should be restored.

If you should be so kind as to reply to this letter, please direct your answer so that it may reach Morganton, NC, to the care of Mrs. Corinna Avery, who is a relative of my wife".

Very Truly,
D.M. Key

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Corrina Avery was the widow of William Waightstill Avery, killed in a fight with Kirk's Raiders in Burke County, NC.

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Last edited:
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
From The Official Records:

UNION REBELLION IN EAST TENNESSEE. 873

KNOXVILLE, TENN., January 20, 1862.
On the 19th day of November last I arrested and brought to this place Levi Trewhitt, esq., of Cleveland, Tenn. This arrest was made under an order from Col. W. B. Wood, commanding the Sixteenth Alabama Regiment, who at that time was the commander of this post. The arrest was ordered because Mr. Trewhitt was suspected of a knowledge of the burning of the railroad bridges and the plans by which it was done. He was retained here for some weeks and then sent to Tuscaloosa by order of General W. H. Carroll, who succeeded Colonel Wood in command. There was no trial or investigation of the charges So far as I know or have understood.

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JAMES. W. GILLESPIE, Colonel Forty-third Regiment Tennessee Volunteers.


His Excellency Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America:

Your petitioners, the undersigned citizens of Bradley County, Tenn., humbly represent and show unto your excellency that Levi Trewhitt, who is now as they understand confined in Mobile as a prisoner of war, is one of the old, influential citizens of Bradley County, Tenn.; that he is about sixty-five years of age and has been for the past few years afflicted with paralysis and as they now understand is sick and in the hospital at Mobile. They further state that said Trewhitt was a very useful man at home. We, therefore, pray that said Levi Trewhitt be released from said confinement upon his becoming a loyal citizen and taking an oath to support the constitution of the Confederate States of America; and as in duty bound will ever pray, &c. WILLIAM GRANT.
T. L. HOYL.
JNO. B. HOYL.
[And 31 others.]
We, the undersigned officers in the Confederate service, fully concur with the above petitioners. D. M. KEY, Lieutenant-Colonel.
[JAMES W.] GILLESPIE, Colonel Regiment Tennessee Volunteers.

[And 16 others.]
 
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Joined
Jun 20, 2012
Location
Pacific Northwest
My wife and I both have our roots in Roane County and the surrounding area, with soldiers on both sides:
  • John and William Capshaw, Co. C, 1st TN Inf.
  • Joseph Richardson, Co. K, 4th TN Inf.
  • Calvin, Ewell, George, and Mark Crabtree, Co. B, 5th TN Cav.
  • George Brown, Co. K, 8th TN Inf. Deserted twice, ended up as a POW in Maryland.
  • Andrew Smith, Co. L, 13th TN Inf.
  • William Richardson, Co. A, 16th TN Inf.
  • Josiah Capshaw, Co. G, 16th TN Inf.
  • George Crabtree, Co. I, 17th TN Inf.
  • Peter Murray, Co. B, 26th TN Inf. Captured at Fort Donelson, paroled at Vicksburg.
  • William Richardson, Co. A, 38th TN Inf.
  • Larken and Meredith Raper, Co. K, 39th TN Mounted Infantry. Larken was killed at Vicksburg, Meredith surrendered and was paroled.
  • Jefferson Crabtree, Co. F, 43rd TN Inf.
  • Jacob Raper, Co. K, 43rd TN Inf. Captured at Morristown, TN in 1864 and held in Ohio.
  • John Crabtree, Co. B, 44th TN Inf. Captured at Petersburg in 1864, sent to Elmira, NY. Died in Oct. 1864 after being paroled.
  • Abraham Sutton, Co. E, 59th TN Mounted Infantry.
  • Shadrick Murray, Co. B, Cox's TN Cavalry. Captured in 1862 at Parker's Crossroads.
 
Joined
Jun 20, 2012
Location
Pacific Northwest
Our Union kin:
  • Andrew, Sampson and Nathaniel Mullinex, Co. B and Co. D, 2nd TN Inf. Nathaniel was captured in 1863 and died in 1864 in Virginia. Sampson was captured with his brother and died in 1864 in Andersonville, from scurvy.
  • Martin Parish, Co. G, 2nd TN Mounted Infantry.
  • Russell and William Richardson, Co. E, 2nd TN Mounted Infantry.
  • Josiah and William Capshaw, Co. E and Co. K, 4th TN Mounted Infantry. Related to the Confederate Capshaws noted previously.
  • Craig Brandon, Co. D, 4th TN Inf. Died in 1864 in Andersonville, from smallpox.
  • George Baskett, Co. B, 4th TN Cavalry.
  • Alexander Brandon, Co. B, 4th TN Cavalry. Died in 1864 from wounds sustained near Okalona, Mississippi.
  • Endimyon Brandon Sr., Endimyon Brandon Jr., and Nathaniel Brandon, Co. B, 4th TN Cavalry. Endimyon Sr. died in hospital in Pulaski, VA from wounds sustained in Dec 1864. Endimyon Jr. died in camp hospital in Greenville, Alabama in 1865.
  • Amos, John, and Isham Mullinex, Co. B, 4th TN Cavalry.
  • Franklin and John Brandon, Co. H, 4th TN Cavalry. Franklin died in Mississippi in 1864, not known if disease or wounds.
  • William Raper, Co. A, 7th TN Mounted Infantry.
  • Samuel Parrish, Co. D, 7th TN Cavalry. Captured and paroled at Battle of Trenton, 1862.
  • William Worsham, Co. F, 7th TN Cavalry.
  • George Crabtree, Co. G, 8th TN Cavalry. Related to Confederate Crabtrees above.
  • John Sutton, Co. E, 9th TN Cavalry. Related to Confederate Suttons.
  • William Mullinex, Co. E, 10th TN Inf.
  • Harold and John Raper, Co. C, 10th TN Cavalry.
  • Hillsbury Richardson, Co. E, 13th TN Cavalry.
 
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