Discussion Reluctant Rebs & "Homegrown Yanks": East Tennesseans in the Civil War


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Culvert was 1st Lt. With Company H. I wonder if he took over after the Kirkland gang killed your ancestor Captain Gray or was Gray killed after the 3rd was disbanded?
Joseph was killed at his home Jan.15, 1865. There were men in Company F in my end of the State that were still fighting Confederate holdouts after they were mustered out. LOL ! They tried to get credit for it in their pension records. That didn't work out to good !
 

TnFed

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Lol, I know what you mean. Lyons and his men were still taking prisoners in May of 65. My gg uncle James was still going into Northern GA and doing the same. Do you recall the duel in Company D between Captain James L. J. Pearson and Lt James Madison Giles? Giles killed Captain Pearson and was wounded in the hip, he ran off, was captured and acquainted by a plea of self defense. After the war he tried to get a pension. He was told you get it for being wounded in combat with the enemy not your commanding officer, lol,lol,lol.
 

TnFed

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What makes researching East TN regiments so difficult for those who do not have roots there, is the fact that you not only have Union and Confederate Units that have the same designation such as 3rd Tn Mt. Infantry. Which if you check certain old newspaper accounts they do not say USA or CSA. Mainly because the people there at that time knew who they meant. You also have quite a few men who served on both sides on the same numerical unit.

Another difficulty is the fact that family members served on different sides at different times. Companies C G H of the 3rd Union chased after the Kirkland Guerrillas quite a bit. Before during and after their enlistment they were involved in that counter-insurgent warfare. The thing is, there were two Kirklands in Company C, one in Company G and four in Company H. Again you had family on different sides. I would say that Kentucky saw a lot of the same.
 
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What makes researching East TN regiments so difficult for those who do not have roots there, is the fact that you not only have Union and Confederate Units that have the same designation such as 3rd Tn Mt. Infantry. Which if you check certain old newspaper accounts they do not say USA or CSA. Mainly because the people there at that time knew who they meant. You also have quite a few men who served on both sides on the same numerical unit.

Another difficulty is the fact that family members served on different sides at different times. Companies C G H of the 3rd Union chased after the Kirkland Guerrillas quite a bit. Before during and after their enlistment they were involved in that counter-insurgent warfare. The thing is, there were two Kirklands in Company C, one in Company G and four in Company H. Again you had family on different sides. I would say that Kentucky saw a lot of the same.
Great Points ! Here's a good example of what you said ! https://civilwartalk.com/threads/a-recent-find-a-civil-war-believe-it-or-not.144206/
 
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I have read that the Voyles were of Spanish descent. Is that true? Enoch Volyes was Captain of Compaany G 3rd TN Mounted Infantry USA. My g g uncle James Morrow was 1st. Lieutenant of that Company.
Regards, TnFed.
That's interesting. The oldest ancestor I could trace is James Voyles Sr. (1766-1866) who was born in SC. And the Voyles last name itself is an English surname of Welsh origins.
 

TnFed

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That's interesting. The oldest ancestor I could trace is James Voyles Sr. (1766-1866) who was born in SC. And the Voyles last name itself is an English surname of Welsh origins.
http://freepages.rootsweb.com/~snipper/genealogy/3mir/mirdex.html
Tenn Mountain, On this website if you go to Company G and look down the list of soldiers you will see the name James G. Hickey. When you hit his bio, it says that Hickey married a Ruth Voyles, would be the sister of Enoch and brothers. However two of his grand daughters writing about him call his wife Martha, which was the name of his mother-in-law. Very confusing. It is one of the women who mention the Spanish heritage thing. Maybe you can make heads or tails of it. It confuses me for sure. By the way my gg uncle James Morrow was married to Hickey's sister. They were all from around the Cherokee County NC area. If you can figure it out let me know.
Regards, TnFed.
 

TnFed

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Glenn, you have collected a fantastic amount of information on East-TN in the Civil War. If you could paper copy it, you would have a great book. Don't know about the copyright on material though... what you would have to do. That said, at least there is a collection of information on the internet about our people because of your work.

We weren't deep South fireaters or New England abolitionists. Just dirt farmers who wanted to be left alone for the most part. But we weren't. A hero of mine is Alvin York, a man who did not want to fight. But fight he did.I hope someday you get the recognition you deserve for preserving the attitudes and actions of our forebearers.
James.
 
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Glenn, you have collected a fantastic amount of information on East-TN in the Civil War. If you could paper copy it, you would have a great book. Don't know about the copyright on material though... what you would have to do. That said, at least there is a collection of information on the internet about our people because of your work.

We weren't deep South fireaters or New England abolitionists. Just dirt farmers who wanted to be left alone for the most part. But we weren't. A hero of mine is Alvin York, a man who did not want to fight. But fight he did.I hope someday you get the recognition you deserve for preserving the attitudes and actions of our forebearers.
James.
Thank you my friend !
 

TnFed

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emanuel wolf.jpeg

Emanuel Wolfe

I was recently contacted by William Peters, 2 x great-grandson of Sergeant Emanuel (Manuel) Wolfe, Company B Union 1st TN Cavalry Volunteers. Same regiment as my 2 x great-granduncle, William Andrew Blakely, and William's son, James. Emanuel "Manuel" Wolfe was born about 1833 in Hawkins County (east) Tennessee. Manuel joined the Union Army on March 8, 1862 at Camp Garber, Knox County, KY; He was in the same company as his brother Gideon Wolfe; Manuel was promoted to the rank of Sergeant shortly before he was listed as missing in action. From family history, Emanuel was captured January 1, 1864 by Confederate soldiers as he had come home near War Creek, TN for probably a quick visit to his wife and three children. Caroline his wife had attempted to hide him in a corn crib when they heard the Confederate soldiers were coming. He was never heard from after his capture, and the family never received any information on his case. His brother, Gideon Wolfe was Captain of Company B 1st TN Cavalry, his brother, Manson, was a Sergeant in Co.B.

About 30 years later, Manson Wolfe, the younger brother of Manuel, received a visit from a Civil War Veteran. The veteran had heard that there was a family of Wolfe's from eastern Tennessee living in the vicinity of Frisco, Texas. In the spring of 1891 the veteran appeared at the farm of Manson Wolfe in Lebanon, Texas, and inquired about his relation to the Wolfe's of eastern Tennessee. Upon learning that Manson was from Thorn Hill, he proceeded to tell him of the capture of both himself and Manuel Wolfe by the Confederate Forces. The man and Manuel were both sent to the Confederate Prisoner of War Camp in Andersonville, Georgia. The man related to Manson that he and Manuel had become good friends and that Manuel had become sick and died in his arms.

I was able to relate to William that Emmanuel Wolfe’s death record from Howard Grove Hospital in Richmond, VA would seem to indicate he died at the prison in Danville,VA as opposed to Andersonville. It would also seem that Wolfe was more likely captured at the Battle of Mossy Creek near Dandridge, Tennessee.

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john w morgan.jpg


An East Tennessee Confederate Infantryman of The Thomas Legion. Colonel Will Thomas authorized the recruitment of a Company of Tennesseans from Jefferson County. The Company was organized on September 30, 1862, by William B. Love, who was elected Captain. Assigned to Walker's Battalion, it became known as Love's Company and was assigned to the Regiment in January 1863.

This portrait of Corporal John W. Morgan was likely produced upon his September 30, 1862 enlistment into the Will Thomas Legion, a unique organization of East Tennessee-western North Carolina mountaineers and Cherokee Indians. The trim on his coat is distinctive of Thomas' Legion and the rarely seen Confederate forage cap bears the brass lettering T. L. indicative of Thomas' Legion.

Youthful Corporal Morgan, born in 1844 leaves us a rare look at the uniform of a very unique command. Unfortunately, Morgan would not live to see twenty years of age and, returning home ill, he died of typhoid fever at his Strawberry Plains, Tennessee home July 24th, 1863. Also serving in the Legion were, Abram, Alfred, and George Morgan. Not sure of the relationship, if any. His older brother, Nathan may have served in the Federal Army.
 
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Missouri Union Cavalryman, Stephen E. Crouch, 15th Missouri Cavalry had Rebel "family ties" back in East Tennessee. His father, Allen Crouch, was one of 13 children born to Jesse Hitter Crouch Sr. and Mary Nance. Two of Allen's older brothers and Stephen's uncles were twins Jesse Jr. and Jonathan Crouch. On June 6, 1863, in Sullivan County, Tennessee, the 54-year-old twins enlisted in Captain Trevitt's Company of Confederate Home-Guard, "The Sullivan County, Reserves".

Son of Allen & Jane Hickman Crouch. Born in Greene County,(east) Tennessee, approximately 1846. Enrolled to serve 20 months, Nov.1,1863 at Mt.Vernon, Mo. Mustered at Springfield, Mo. July 15, 1864. 18 year-old farmer,5'10',hazel eyes, fair complexion,light-colored hair. Died at home of 'consumption',May 20,1865. Buried Round Grove Cemetery, Round Grove, Lawrence County, Missouri. Stephen had Confederate cousins from east Tennessee.

Many thanks to @Zella for assistance with Stephen's record!

Fifteenth Cavalry
MISSOURI UNION VOLUNTEERS
(20-MONTHS)

Fifteenth Cavalry. -- Col., John D. Allen, Lieut.-Col..
Benjamin D. Smith; Majs., W. B. Mitchell, Wick Morgan, J. M.
Moore.

This regiment was originally the 7th provisional regiment
Enrolled Missouri militia, and was mustered into the U. S.
service for a period of 20 months dating from Nov. 1, 1863,
the order for the muster coming from the war department on
June 10, 1864.

The first order for the organization of the regiment came from
the governor's office on March 12, 1863, and it was mustered
into the state service on April 1, with 629 men. From that
time until the following autumn it was on duty in the western
part of the state, clearing the country of guerrillas and
protecting the property of loyal citizens.

In the months of September and October another battalion was
added and the regiment fully organized and equipped as a
cavalry regiment. It was the first to start in pursuit of the
Confederate Gen. Jo. Shelby, when he entered Missouri,
following him as far north as the Osage River, and then back
to the Arkansas line, signally defeating him in Barry County.

After being mustered into the U. S. service it was attached to
Sanborn's brigade and played a conspicuous part in the pursuit
of the Confederate forces under Gen. Price, during that
officer's invasion of Missouri.

Concerning the regiment the adjutant-general says in his
report for 1865: "While they have not had the same
opportunities as other regiments to win laurels on the field
in open combat, they are none the less deserving the praise
and lasting gratitude of Southwest Missouri, from the fact
that they have constantly had to meet not the open enemy but
the subtle, wily and intriguing guerrilla and bushwhacker, who
make their assaults from the brush thicket and dense grove,
leaving them but little chance for defense, and subjecting
them to greater danger than those who have to meet the enemy
with something like equal chances."

The regiment was mustered out on July 1, 1865.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 4, p. 278

**************************************************************************************



Screenshot (30).png

Screenshot (29).png


Two weeks later George Anderson Crouch, son of Jonathan, (and Stephen's 1st cousin), enlisted in a Washington County Home-Guard unit, Lieut W.W.Blair's Company "The Young Rebels of Jonesboro". He served as a 1st Sergeant.
Jesse Hitter Crouch Confederate Record.jpg

Jonathan Crouch Confederate Record.jpg

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/36649501/jesse-hiter-crouch
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/101969711/jessie-hiter-crouch
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/71920638/jonathan-mulkey-crouch
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/75774393/allen-crouch
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/76426885/stephen-e_-crouch
 
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Thanks to @Zella for assistance.

East Tennessee Confederates :

jonh m hooper.jpg

John M. Hooper:
Private, McClung's Tennessee Light Artillery. Enlisted December 1, 1861. Present and on the rolls until captured Oct. 28, 1864, in Jefferson County, (east) Tennessee. Sent to Camp Douglass, Illinois, via Chattanooga, TN. then to Louisville, KY. John's name appears on a prison roll dated Feb.15, 1865 with the notation, "Claims to have been loyal, enlisted through false representation, and desires to take the Oath of Allegiance". John was released from Camp Douglass on May 13, 1865. John was only 16 when he enlisted. He was actually discharged at age 17, for being underage in April 1862 with the passage of the 1st Conscription Act. He either rejoined his command after turning 18 or was conscripted.
edgemond.gif

Pollard Edgemon: Private, Company B 5th (east) Tennessee Cavalry. Enlisted Jan.25, mustered Jan.27, 1862. Pollard served as 2nd Sergeant until he was captured on the retreat from Dalton, GA. May 13, 1864.

absolom k mccarty co k 19th tn.jpg

Sgt. Absolom Kyle McCarty, Company K, 19th Tennessee Infantry. McCarty enlisted on 22 May 1861 in Knoxville. He was slightly wounded at the Battle of Murfreesboro, Tennessee on 31 December 1862. He was captured on 12 November 1864 in Hawkins County, Tennessee and later released.

Pvt. John M. Romines, Company I, 19th Tennessee Infantry..jpg

Pvt. John M. Romines: Company I, 19th Tennessee Infantry. Romines enlisted on 20 May 1861 in Knoxville. His military records note that he deserted on 23 November 1862.

martin ally hardin.jpg

Sgt. Martin Ally Hardin: Company E, 59th Tennessee Infantry. Hardin enlisted on 12 February 1862 in Madisonville, Tennessee. It is noted in his records that he was "captured on the retreat from Port Gibson May 3 1863". He was paroled, but his military records cease after that point.

Augustus Washington Dyer.jpg

Augustus Washington Dyer: Augustus was not alone in serving in the Confederate Army, his brother Lewis Tharp Dyer (1841-1916) also served as a Private in the 61st Tennessee Mounted Infantry, Co.B, and his brother William Thomas Dyer (1833-1870) served as a Sergeant in the 39th Tennessee Mounted Infantry, Co. D.

Like many East Tennessee families, the Dyer Family had men serving on both sides. Augustus Dyer's brother, Richard Fain Dyer (1839-1821) served in the 4th Tennessee Infantry, Co.K and 1st Tennessee Cavalry, Co.K (US). Augustus also had a brother-in-law, John Simpson Beals (Bales) (1844-1904), that served as a Private in both the 11th Tennessee Cavalry, Co.D and the 9th Tennessee Cavalry, Co.K.
 
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SeMcM

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Thanks to @Zella for assistance.

East Tennessee Confederates :

View attachment 306389
John M. Hooper:
Private, McClung's Tennessee Light Artillery. Enlisted December 1, 1861. Present and on the rolls until captured Oct. 28, 1864, in Jefferson County, (east) Tennessee. Sent to Camp Douglass, Illinois, via Chattanooga, TN. then to Louisville, KY. John's name appears on a prison roll dated Feb.15, 1865 with the notation, "Claims to have been loyal, enlisted through false representation, and desires to take the Oath of Allegiance". John was released from Camp Douglass on May 13, 1865. John was only 16 when he enlisted. He was actually discharged at age 17, for being underage in April 1862 with the passage of the 1st Conscription Act. He either rejoined his command after turning 18 or was conscripted.
View attachment 306390
Pollard Edgemon: Private, Company B 5th (east) Tennessee Cavalry. Enlisted Jan.25, mustered Jan.27, 1862. Pollard served as 2nd Sergeant until he was captured on the retreat from Dalton, GA. May 13, 1864.

View attachment 306391
Sgt. Absolom Kyle McCarty, Company K, 19th Tennessee Infantry. McCarty enlisted on 22 May 1861 in Knoxville. He was slightly wounded at the Battle of Murfreesboro, Tennessee on 31 December 1862. He was captured on 12 November 1864 in Hawkins County, Tennessee and later released.

View attachment 306394
Pvt. John M. Romines: Company I, 19th Tennessee Infantry. Romines enlisted on 20 May 1861 in Knoxville. His military records note that he deserted on 23 November 1862.

View attachment 306398
Sgt. Martin Ally Hardin: Company E, 59th Tennessee Infantry. Hardin enlisted on 12 February 1862 in Madisonville, Tennessee. It is noted in his records that he was "captured on the retreat from Port Gibson May 3 1863". He was paroled, but his military records cease after that point.

View attachment 306401
Augustus Washington Dyer: Augustus was not alone in serving in the Confederate Army, his brother Lewis Tharp Dyer (1841-1916) also served as a Private in the 61st Tennessee Mounted Infantry, Co.B, and his brother William Thomas Dyer (1833-1870) served as a Sergeant in the 39th Tennessee Mounted Infantry, Co. D.

Like many East Tennessee families, the Dyer Family had men serving on both sides. Augustus Dyer's brother, Richard Fain Dyer (1839-1821) served in the 4th Tennessee Infantry, Co.K and 1st Tennessee Cavalry, Co.K (US). Augustus also had a brother-in-law, John Simpson Beals (Bales) (1844-1904), that served as a Private in both the 11th Tennessee Cavalry, Co.D and the 9th Tennessee Cavalry, Co.K.
According to his pension application, Lewis Dyer was in the battle of Big Black, Miss. on May 17, 1863. He "lost his mind" in the raging of the battle, was captured, and was unable to give any account of his life after going to prison. He spent about 14 years in the State Lunatic Asylum, and was insane the rest of his life.

Richard Fain Dyer's daughter Isabelle and her husband Bailes Jeffers were foster parents to my grandmother, raising her from the age of 5.
 
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According to his pension application, Lewis Dyer was in the battle of Big Black, Miss. on May 17, 1863. He "lost his mind" in the raging of the battle, was captured, and was unable to give any account of his life after going to prison. He spent about 14 years in the State Lunatic Asylum and was insane the rest of his life.

Richard Fain Dyer's daughter Isabelle and her husband Bailes Jeffers were foster parents to my grandmother, raising her from the age of 5.

Thanks, good to hear from you again !
 

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