Reluctant Rebs & "Homegrown Yanks": East Tennesseans in the Civil War

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The William J. Owens in Ashby's 2nd Tenn Cavalry (Confederate) and 4th Cavalry Battalion ?
William A. Owens joined Co. D of the 31st Tennessee Mtd. Infantry commanded by Col. W. M. Bradford. (This regiment was later changed to the 39th Tennessee due to the coincidence of another 31st Tennessee in West Tennessee also commanded by a Col Bradford.) He joined on Feb 18, 1862. After 1 year of service, William Owens was discharged. He returned to Hawkins County where he became captain of a loosely knit band of scouts & paroled soldiers, including his son Alfred Owens. They were under the command of Gen. John C. Vaughn. (Several of these soldiers were from the 31st /39th TN who had been captured, then paroled at Vicksburg, including his son Alfred.) According to a biography of William’s son John, he also joined his father’s band at age 13 until the end of the war.
 

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William A. Owens joined Co. D of the 31st Tennessee Mtd. Infantry commanded by Col. W. M. Bradford. (This regiment was later changed to the 39th Tennessee due to the coincidence of another 31st Tennessee in West Tennessee also commanded by a Col Bradford.) He joined on Feb 18, 1862. After 1 year of service, William Owens was discharged. He returned to Hawkins County where he became captain of a loosely knit band of scouts & paroled soldiers, including his son Alfred Owens. They were under the command of Gen. John C. Vaughn. (Several of these soldiers were from the 31st /39th TN who had been captured, then paroled at Vicksburg, including his son Alfred.) According to a biography of William’s son John, he also joined his father’s band at age 13 until the end of the war.
https://civilwartalk.com/threads/el...om-east-tennessee-to-texas.92366/#post-757804
 
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William A. Owens joined Co. D of the 31st Tennessee Mtd. Infantry commanded by Col. W. M. Bradford. (This regiment was later changed to the 39th Tennessee due to the coincidence of another 31st Tennessee in West Tennessee also commanded by a Col Bradford.) He joined on Feb 18, 1862. After 1 year of service, William Owens was discharged. He returned to Hawkins County where he became captain of a loosely knit band of scouts & paroled soldiers, including his son Alfred Owens. They were under the command of Gen. John C. Vaughn. (Several of these soldiers were from the 31st /39th TN who had been captured, then paroled at Vicksburg, including his son Alfred.) According to a biography of William’s son John, he also joined his father’s band at age 13 until the end of the war.
There was a George Owens in the 59th TN. He applied for a pension from Hawkins County. Brother or cousin maybe ?
 
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East Tennesseans In Blue & Gray

www.greenecountytngenealogicalsociety.org/peoplethenandnow/

The upper-east Tennessee counties of Greene & Washington were two of the most bitterly divided in an extremely divided section of East Tennessee. The following men, some pictured in post-war photos with their families served. A few were Confederate, most were Union. I've attempted to research their service. I list them as they're named in the above link. I plan to add more later.

Barnett Baxter: UNION 18 years old, enlisted on 6/14/1864 as a Private. On 6/29/1864 he mustered into "A" Co. TN 8th Cavalry. He was Mustered Out on 9/11/1865 at Knoxville, TN.

Christopher Alexander Haun: UNION Master Potter and Unionist, Midway area/Greene County. Executed in Knoxville by Confederates for the Lick Creek Bridge Burning incident. Today his pottery is highly valued by collectors.

https://civilwartalk.com/threads/re...s-in-the-civil-war.129343/page-5#post-1581008

Daniel Simpson: UNION Enlisted and mustered on 7/1/1864 as a 2nd Lieutenant into "A" Co. TN 3rd Mtd Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 11/30/1864.

John C. Bible: UNION 24 years old, enlisted on 6/11/1863 as a Commissary Sergeant On 6/30/1863 he mustered into "A" Co. TN 8th Cavalry. 2nd Lieut 9/1/1864, Capt 3/18/1865 (As of Co. G). He was Mustered Out on 9/11/1865 at Knoxville, TN.

Elbert Sutherland: UNION 23 years old, enlisted on 11/15/1861 as a Private. On 6/15/1863 he mustered into "G" Co. TN 4th Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 7/7/1865.

Isaac N. Broyles: CONFEDERATE Enrolled Sept.26, 1862 mustered on 10/1/1862 as a Private into "D" Co. TN 61st Infantry. Isaac was paroled at the surrender of Vicksburg. His name appears on the roll dated April 30, 1864. "absent, paroled & not exchanged". Isaac died June 16, 1902. His widow, Mary unsuccessfully filed for a pension on September 23, 1907. She claimed Isaac returned from Vicksburg almost dead with malaria, was under a doctors care for over a year, and never able to return to the army. Unfortunately, both her "witnesses" never returned to the rebel army either and without proof of his discharge from the army, or of being surrendered, she was denied a pension.

James W. Henshaw: CONFEDERATE Enlisted on 8/1/1861 at Henderson Depot by Col. James W. Gillespie for 12 months, elected 2nd Lieutenant November 1861, promoted Captain November 4, 1862, wounded, date in 1864 not specified, paroled with Gen. Joseph E. Johnston's Army Command at Greensboro, NC May 1, 1865. James migrated to Waco, McLennan County, Texas following the war. He died there December 24, 1903.

Waco Times-Herald, 1903
Thu., Dec. 24 (4-6); J. W. Henshaw, of 3rd & Jones, died today. Born Greene Co., Tenn., June 8, 1839. Capt. in C.S.A. Married to Mattie C. McGaughey and to Texas in 1866. To Waco in 1872. Wife died in 1886. In 1891, married to Mrs. Angie Roberts, who survives. Two sons; Frank E. and Jame
s M. of Waco Funeral from the residence tomorrow. Burial at Oakwood cemetery.

John W. Henshaw: CONFEDERATE On 8/1/1861 he enlisted and mustered as a Private into "F" Co. TN 29th Infantry for 12 months, discharged May 15, 1862, no further records. One source says he was KIA in 1864 as a member of the 12th Tennessee Cavalry Battalion. I fail to find him on the muster roll of the 12th.

Jeremiah Casteel: UNION Enlisted on 1/27/1863 as a 32-year-old Private. On 6/15/1863 he mustered into "A" Co. TN 4th Infantry. He died of disease (of erysipelas) on 7/6/1863.

David A. Gass: UNION Enlisted on 9/1/1863 as an 18-year-old Private. On 5/7/1864 he mustered into "A" Co. TN 4th Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 8/2/1865 at Nashville, TN.

Jacob Eisenhower: UNION Enlisted on 1/5/1863 as a Corporal in Cock County, Tenn. for 3 years. On 5/15/1863 he mustered into "D" Co. TN 8th Infantry. Elected Corporal May 14, 1863, absent without leave September 15, 1863, (probably recruiting) present at end of the year 1863 muster, reduced to ranks, absent on detached service (again, probably recruiting) January 25, 1864, recorded present at the May/June, 1864 muster, deserted August 14, 1864, relieved of charge of desertion, discharge furnished January 17, 1867 at Louisville, Ky. to date June 30, 1865. Jacob's brother, Ireneus, was a rebel deserter from the 62nd Tennessee. He joined and recruited for the Union 3rd Tn Mounted Infantry in August 1864, also served in the 8th Tn Infantry. I suspect the Eisenhower brothers both recruited for the Yankees in East Tennessee, and made lots of enemies. Jacob lived out his years in Missouri, Ireneus in Indiana.

Seven Davis Brothers: UNION There were 9 Davis men in the 4th Tn Infantry. John, Phillip, and Samuel enlisted in Company C on 6/15/1863. James Davis enlisted in Company G the same day. Travis Davis enlisted into Company C on 5/1/1864. William into Company E on 12/20/1863. Thomas was commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant on 3/20/1863.
 
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BlueandGrayl

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Like I said East Tennesse whike having a significant Unionist presence and an attempt at statehood in the form of the Knoxville Convention it was actually much more divided. The areas near rivers and railroads as well as having the most commercial ties to the Lower South such as Chattanooga were more pro-Confederate while the areas that were in the mountains like
 
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East Tennesseans In Blue & Gray in the above

www.greenecountytngenealogicalsociety.org/peoplethenandnow/

The upper-east Tennessee counties of Greene & Washington were two of the most bitterly divided in an extremely divided section of East Tennessee. The following men, some pictured in post-war photos with their families served. A few were Confederate, most were Union. I've attempted to research their service. I list them as they're named in the above link. I plan to add more later.


Jacob Eisenhower: UNION Enlisted on 1/5/1863 as a Corporal in Cock County, Tenn. for 3 years. On 5/15/1863 he mustered into "D" Co. TN 8th Infantry. Elected Corporal May 14, 1863, absent without leave September 15, 1863, (probably recruiting) present at end of the year 1863 muster, reduced to ranks, absent on detached service (again, probably recruiting) January 25, 1864, recorded present at the May/June, 1864 muster, deserted August 14, 1864, relieved of charge of desertion, discharge furnished January 17, 1867 at Louisville, Ky. to date June 30, 1865. Jacob's brother, Ireneus, was a rebel deserter from the 62nd Tennessee. He joined and recruited for the Union 3rd Tn Mounted Infantry in August 1864, also served in the 8th Tn Infantry. I suspect the Eisenhower brothers both recruited for the Yankees in East Tennessee, and made lots of enemies. Jacob lived out his years in Missouri, Ireneus in Indiana.
Your Jacob Eisenhower sounds like he could possibly be one of the Eisenhower's from Tennessee who married into one of my Tennessee derived lines in Missouri. I'll have to go check.
 
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East Tennesseans In Blue & Gray (continued)

Sarah Elizabeth Lane Thompson: UNION The only "known" woman to be carried on the Union Army pension rolls following the Civil War. Sarah was born February 11, 1838, in Greene County, Tennessee. She married Sylvanius H.Thompson and they had two children. Sylvanius later enlisted on 7/12/1862 as a Private into "D" Co. TN 1st Cavalry Union Volunteers serving predominantly as a recruiter with Sarah working alongside him. Sylvanius was ambushed and killed on 1/10/1864 at Greenville, TN. Spurred by her husband's death, Sarah Thompson continued her work for the Union, delivering dispatches and recruiting information to Union officers. When CSA General John Hunt Morgan and his men spent the night in Greeneville, Sarah managed to slip away and alert Union forces to his whereabouts. Union troops invaded the area and by her accounts, she personally pointed out Morgan hiding behind a garden fence to a Union soldier who proceeded to kill Morgan.

sarah lane thompson.png

After this event, Sarah served as an army nurse in Knoxville, Tennessee and in Cleveland, Ohio. She supported herself and her daughters by giving lectures in several northern cities about her experiences during the war. In 1866 she married Orville J. Bacon of Broome County, New York and had two children with him. They were subsequently divorced and she married James Cotton in the 1880s. Cotton died, leaving her once again a single mother. After the war, Sarah's life was marked by the constant struggle to find suitable employment to support her family and to claim a pension for her services during the war. She worked through many temporary appointments in the federal government and eventually was granted a pension of $12 a month by order of a special act of Congress in 1897. She died on April 21, 1909 after being struck by an "electric car" in Washington, D.C., and was buried in the Arlington National Cemetery.

Richard Jackson: UNION Enlisted age 18 on 8/4/1863 as a Private. On 8/31/1863 he mustered into "H" Co. TN 4th Cavalry. He was Mustered Out on 7/12/1865.

Thomas Daniel Malone: UNION Most likely the Thomas Malone that that enlisted (probably conscripted) into the Confederate 62nd Tn Infantry on 10/1/1862. he later enlisted and mustered on 8/1/1864 as a Private into "B" Co. Union TN 3rd Mtd Infantry.

William Alexander Weems: UNION Enlisted age 16 on 7/12/1862 as a Private into "K" Co. TN 1st Cavalry. He was Mustered Out on 6/14/1865 at Nashville, TN.

William Garrison Greenway: CONFEDERATE Enlisted Sept.21, 1862 at Hendersons Mill, Green County, Tennessee into Company D 61st Tn Infantry. He was captured at Big Black May 17, 1863. Held at Camp Morton, Indiana until exchanged Feb.10, 1865 and listed as "disabled" and sent home. William filed for a Confederate pension March 23, 1905.

William Thomas Bohannon: UNION Probably the William T. Bohannon that enlisted on 8/20/1862 as a Private into "K" Co. IL 119th Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 8/26/1865 at Mobile, AL. Filed for a pension while residing in Tennessee on April 17, 1882. Also his widow, Martha filed from Tennessee, October 14, 1915.

William Winter: UNION Enlisted on 1/5/1863 as a 18- year-old Corporal. On 5/15/1863 he mustered into "B" Co. TN 8th Infantry. He was Mustered Out on 6/30/1865.
 
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The 63rd Tennessee Infantry Confederate Volunteers :

View attachment 131419
Confederate shell jacket of Pvt. Joe Paxton Lyle. Company D 63rd TN

Private Lyle served in Company D with my ancestor / relative, James Jefferson Land. He was one of two witnesses required on James pension application to the State of Tennessee in 1906. There he wrote the following : " I was in the same company with the applicant and knew him well from the time he came to the company till the 2nd of April,1865 when our lines were broken and I was captured. He was a good and faithful soldier and was sick at Cumberland Gap. I always understood he was with the company at the surrender. " Dated : Feb.18,1906. Joseph Paxton Lyle

Joseph Paxton Lyle : Residence, Washington County, TN. Enlisted as a Private . He was listed as: * POW April 2, 1865, (Confined at Fort Delaware) He serviced in: "D" Co. TN 63rd Infantry Born 12/6/1843 in Woodlawn, Johnson City, TN died 3/2/1930 in Johnson City, TN. (known during the war as Johnson's Depot)


The following is a transcription of James Jefferson Land's pension application to the Sate of Tennessee. He filed Feb.21.1905.He was " accepted " May 1,1906. He states his full name. His address at the time was Rural Route # 1 Afton, Greene County, Tennessee. That in the " late war between the states " in the process of the discharge of his duty as a member of Company D 63rd Regt Volunteer Infantry. ( He underlines Confederate States rather than United States ) he " contracted the following disease or disabilities to wit " Rheumatism. To the question " In what County, State, and year were you born ? " Wilkes, North Carolina 1844. James is next asked to tell when he enlisted, and to tell what command and to name regimental and company officers he served under. " I enlisted 1861 latter part, 63rd regiment, Col.Fain, Bushrod Johnson's Brigade, Capt.A.A. Blair, 1st Lt. James McCollum, 2nd Lt. Carter, 3rd Lt Wilson " He is asked if his " wound or disability is permanent and did he contract it in service ? " Contracted in service which is permanent " Were you incapacitated by said wound or disease ?" I was incapacitated five months while a soldier. James was examined byDr.George A McClain. Under oath he makes the following statement : " Rheumatism with enlargement of joints of arm and knee and ankle of left leg. This claimant can walk but leans heavily on his staff. Claimant says he has periods of several weeks continuous in which he has to have the aid of another person to dress him and undress him. The old soldier is not able to perform manual labor for the support of his family and is in destitute circumstances. He is worthy and needs aid as his physical condition is bad. "

Two of James old Rebel Comrades vouched for him in statements they made before the Washington County, Tenn Courts 1st is Joseph P. Lyle : " I was in the same company with the applicant and knew him well from the time he came to the company till the 2nd of April,1865 when our lines were broken and I was captured. He was a good and faithfull soldier and was sick at Cumberland Gap. I always understood he was with the company at the surrender. " Feb.18,1906.

Next was James B. Humpherys who states he was " a private in Company D 63rd Tennessee Infantry that James Jefferson Land was with the Company at Strawberry Plains, Jefferson County, Tenn. when I went to the company. We were ordered to Chickamauga and then ordered up through Knoxville, Tenn. and then ordered into Virginia at Petersburg till the close of the war. Said Land was paroled out and said Land was a good soldier during the rebellion and that said Land was sick five or six months while in the army with a fever and further states James Jefferson Land was paroled out of the army of the Confederates.

Filed Feb.21,1905 | Greene County, Tennessee







View attachment 131420
J. E. Longacre : June 6, 1861, enlisted at Lynchburg for period of 12 months
Sept. 20, 1863, wounded in the left thigh slightly at the battle of Chickamauga
Nov. 1863, promoted to 4 Cpl.
June 17, 1864, captured at Petersburg
June 24, 1864, arrived at City Point
July 27, 1864, transferred to Elmira, N.Y.
July 30, 1864, received at Elmira, N.Y. from Point Lookout, Md.
July 3, 1865, signed Oath of Allegiance to the United States at Elmira, N.Y.
Place of residence - Bristol, Tenn.
Complexion-Fair, Hair-Light
Eyes-Hazel, Height-5 ft 8 in
Born: 1841






View attachment 131421
Marker Commemorating the 63rd's service at Chickamauga.

Chickamagua after battle report:

Report of Maj. John A. Aiken, Sixty-third Tennessee Infantry.

CAMP SIXTY-THIRD TENNESSEE REGT.,
Near Chattanooga, Tenn., September 26, 1863.


SIR: I herewith transmit a report of the action of the Sixty-third
Tennessee Regt. in the battle of the 19th and 20th instant:


On the evening of the 18th, the regiment, under command of
Lieut.-Col. Fulkerson, was formed in line of battle on southeast
bank of Chickamauga Creek, near the crossing, on the right of
the brigade (Gen. Gracie's).


About 10 o'clock at night we were ordered with the brigade to
cross the creek and form in line of battle, so as to protect the
crossing should the enemy advance. The line established, we
remained until 9 a. m. the 19th, when we were moved in column
about 1 mile distant and to our left, and again a bluff overlooking
the enemy's battery. We had been formed about one hour when
the enemy opened upon us with shot and shell, severely
wounding 1 lieutenant and 1 man. After some time, and the
firing from that battery had ceased, we were moved in column
by a circuitous route to the right and formed 300 yards in rear of
Col. Triggs brigade, where we remained exposed to a fire of
shot and shell until dark.


Sunday morning, the 20th, we were ordered to march in line of
battle in direction of the Chattanooga road, and before reaching
the road we were marched by the right flank into and along the
Chattanooga road in the direction of heavy musketry and artillery
firing when we again formed in line of battle to the right of the
road, where we remained for about one hour, when the command
"left face" was given and we marched at double-quick across the
Chattanooga
road west about one-half mile, when we were
thrown into column of companies and then into line on the right
of the brigade and near the left of Barksdale's [Humphreys']
(Mississippi) brigade, and on the right slope of the hill occupied
by the enemy. The line was formed under a heavy fire of
musketry. By some means the regiment became separated from
the brigade and was subjected to a heavy fire in front and from
the right. As soon as information could be communicated to the
commander of the brigade of our exposed position, the
Forty-third Alabama Regt. was sent to support us on the left.
The two regiments charged up the hill very near the enemy's
position, but the fire of shot, shell, and musketry being so heavy,
were compelled to retire.


It was the first fire to which the regiment was ever exposed, and
considering everything--that it formed under fire and was
subjected to a heavy fire of artillery and musketry from the front
and a rapid cross-fire from the right--too much praise cannot be
awarded to the officers and men of the regiment for the manner
in which they conducted themselves. I have no particular cases
of gallantry to mention. All did their duty nobly.


Of the 402 aggregate taken into the engagement, 184 were
wounded and 16 killed.


Among the killed were Capt. J. T. Gillespie and Second Lieut.
S. M. Deaderick, who fell at the same time, while gallantly
cheering their men on up the hill.


It is due the regiment to say that if fell back in good order and
not until the last round of cartridge had been exhausted. No
troops during the entire engagement were exposed to a more
deadly fire or withstood the shock with more coolness and
determination.


Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

John. A. AIKEN,
Maj., Comdg. Sixty-third Tennessee Regt.


Capt. H. E. JONES,
Assistant Adjutant-Gen.


Source: Official Records
CHAP. XLII.] THE CHICKAMAUGA CAMPAIGN. PAGE 428-51
[Series I. Vol. 30. Part II, Reports. Serial No. 51.]


******************************************************************************
View attachment 131487


Private Augustas Etter Company C 63rd Tennessee. Enlisted Sept.24, 1862. Captured April 4, 1865, Hatchers Run, VA. Held at Point Lookout, MD. until June 12, 1865. His brother, Lieutenant L.L. Etter commanded the remnant of the 63rd at Appomattox. Two other brothers served in the 19th Tennessee, one was killed at Shiloh.
henley fugate.jpg


Henly Fugate: Enlisted on 7/1/1862 at Tazewell, TN. Commissioned as a 1st Lieutenant into "A" Co. TN 63rd Infantry. Wounded 9/20/1863 Chickamauga, GA (Loss of arm). Capt 10/1/1863 (Estimated date). Died 3/24/1913 in Richmond, VA. The Captain's empty sleeve is plainly visible.
 
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The Colonel Writes from Cumberland Gap :

Abramfulkerson.jpg


Abram Fulkerson was born on May 13, 1834, in Washington County, Virginia. His grandfather, James Fulkerson, had served as a Captain, in the Virginia Militia during the American Revolution, joining with the Over-mountain Men and fighting the British at the Battle of Kings Mountain. His father, Abram Fulkerson Sr., had served during the War of 1812 as a captain of a Virginia Militia company in Colonel David Sanders' Regiment, 4th Brigade, Norfolk Division under Gen. Peter B. Porter. Fulkerson graduated from the Virginia Military Institute at Lexington in 1857, where he was a student of Prof. Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, as had been his elder brother Samuel Vance Fulkerson (1822-1862), who had served in the Mexican–American War and as a delegate to the Virginia Constitutional Convention of 1850. Samuel was killed in action leading the 37th Virginia Infantry at the Battle of Gaines Mill. Another brother, Isaac Fulkerson (1829-July 20, 1889), was a captain in the 8th Texas Cavalry (Terry's Texas Rangers). After graduation, Abram taught school in Palmyra, Virginia, then in 1860 in Rogersville, Hawkins County, (east) Tennessee.

He entered Confederate military service in June 1861 as a Captain, having organized a company of men from Hawkins County, Tennessee, that was mustered into the 19th Tennessee Infantry Regiment as Company K (The Hawkins Boys) at Knoxville, Tennessee. His was the first company of volunteers organized in East Tennessee, and Abram Fulkerson received a commission as the regiment's Major. He was wounded in the thigh and his horse shot from under him at the Battle of Shiloh. After recovery and the unit's reorganization, he was reassigned to the 63rd Tennessee Infantry. Commissioned as Lieutenant Colonel of the 63rd, and President Jefferson Davis on February 12, 1864, commissioned him as a full Colonel.

Abram Fulkerson twice helped garrison the Cumberland Gap: first with the 19th Tennessee then with the 63rd Tennessee. On May 18, 1863, while at Cumberland Gap, he penned a letter to his wife in which he noted that he was visited there by President Jefferson Davis:

"One of our pickets came in the other day and reported that a Mr. Davis was at the lines and desired to enter. This report took me very much by surprise, for although you had mentioned the probability of his coming yet I did not look for him. He only stayed a few hours. After dinner (a very poor one without apology to him) I went [around] to show him some of the curiosities of Cumberland Gap, which he seemed to think would compensate anyone for making the visit. He went back up the valley and expected to get home by Wednesday next".

In the same letter, he addressed the news of General Stonewall Jackson's death:

"The intelligence of the death of Gen. Jackson came upon us like a shock. We feel that his death is a national calamity. The poorest soldiers among us appreciated his worth - loved the man, and mourn his loss. I knew him well. He was my preceptor for more than four years and whilst during that time I did not appreciate the man, at school, as schoolboys are not like to do, yet I always had great reverence for the man on account of his piety & uprightness of character. Among the many heroes of this revolution, none have lived so much adored, none have died a death so much deplored, and none have left a character as spotless as that of Stonewall Jackson. Could his life have been spared till the close of this cruel war, the unanimous voice of a grateful people would have proclaimed him chief ruler of the nation. But God has seen proper to take him from us, and what He does is right and for the best. It is therefore that we make the sacrifice cheerfully, tho we cannot see why our country should be deprived of his services at her hour of greatest need".

While with the 63rd, Fulkerson was wounded twice more: in the left arm at the Battle of Chickamauga and again at the Second Battle of Petersburg, Virginia the regiment having returned to the Army of Northern Virginia with Longstreet's Corps from East Tennessee. He was taken prisoner on June 17, 1864, and sent to the POW camp at Fort Delaware. While a POW, Fulkerson became part of the Immortal Six Hundred, 600 captured Confederate officers who were taken to Morris Island at Charleston, South Carolina and used as human shields by the Union Army for six weeks in an attempt to silence the Confederate gunners at Fort Sumter, in response to Union officer prisoners being placed among civilians to stop Union gunners from firing into downtown Charleston.[6] Though none of the Immortal Six Hundred were killed by the continuing Confederate artillery fire from Fort Sumter, 14 died of dysentery.

After Morris Island, Fulkerson was taken to Fort Pulaski and placed on starvation rations for 42 days in retaliation for Confederate prisoner abuses at Andersonville. Crowded into the fort's cold, damp casements, the Confederates' "retaliation ration" consisted of 10 ounces of moldy cornmeal and a half pint of soured onion pickles. The starving men supplemented their rations with the occasional rat or stray cat. Thirteen men died there of preventable diseases such as dysentery and scurvy.

In March 1865 Fulkerson was returned to Fort Delaware, where he was discharged and paroled on July 25, 1865, months after General Robert E. Lee's surrender at Appomattox.

After Fulkerson returned home, his horse that he rode during his military service, whose official name was "Zollicoffer" (after former newspaper editor, Congressman, and early casualty among the Confederate Officer Corp, Felix Zollicoffer), was returned to him. Fulkerson kept the horse for the rest of its life, but called him "Old Bob." When the horse died, former Confederates from the Bristol area assembled and conducted a military funeral for it. In 1885, Stonewall Jackson's horse, "Little Sorrel," was brought to Bristol on a tour and Fulkerson rode it and was photographed as a number of former veterans assembled to pay their respects.

Fulkerson died in Bristol, Virginia, on December 17, 1902, at the age of 68, of complications after suffering a stroke. He was buried there in East Hill Cemetery in Sullivan County, (east) Tennessee.

LittleSorrel_and_Colonel_Abram_Fulkerson_v_1517478586.jpg

The Colonel holds the reins of “Little Sorrel.”
 
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General Grant deals with Confederate threats to Southern Unionists in east Tennessee

Grant238.jpg


Believed to be Assistant Adjutant-General Bowers on the right.

GENERAL ORDER No. 4.
HDQRS. MIL. DIV. OF THE MISSISSIPPI,
In the Field, Chattanooga, Tenn.,
November 5, 1863.

The habit of raiding parties of rebel cavalry visiting towns, villages, and farms, where there are no Federal forces, and pillaging Union families, having become prevalent, department commanders will take immediate steps to abate the evil or make the loss by such raids fall upon secessionists and secession sympathizers of the neighborhood where such acts are committed.

For every act of violence to the person of an unarmed Union citizen, a secessionist will be arrested and held as hostage for the delivery of the offender.

For every dollar’s worth of property taken from such citizens or destroyed by raiders, an assessment will be made upon secessionists of the neighborhood and collected by the nearest military forces under the supervision of the commander thereof, and the amount thus collected paid over to the sufferers.

When such assessments cannot be collected in money, property useful to the Government may be taken at a fair valuation, and the amount paid in money by a disbursing officer of the Government, who will take such property upon his returns.

Wealthy secession citizens will be assessed in money and provisions for the support of Union refugees who have and may be driven from their homes and into our lines by the acts of those with whom such secession citizens are in sympathy.

All collections and payments under this order will be made through disbursing officers of the Government, whose accounts must show all money and property received under it and how disposed of.

By order of Maj. Gen. U. S. Grant.
T. S. BOWERS,
Assistant Adjutant-General.
 
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An East Tennessee "Galvanized Yankee"

daviddfranklin.jpg

David DeLafayette Franklin: Was born in 1833, in McMinn County (east) Tennessee. He enlisted on 5/15/1861 into Company C (Polk County) (John Carter Vaughn's & Newton Lillard's) Confederate 3rd Tennessee Infantry, the 1st Rebel regiment raised in east Tennessee. The 3rd Tennessee took part in the Battle of 1st Bull Run (or Manassas, Va). David was part of the Rebel garrison surrendered and paroled at Vicksburg. He was captured a second time in December, 1863. This time he was sent to prison at Rock Island, Illinois. He soon contracted smallpox and was admitted to the prison hospital. In October,1864, The Union Army began recruiting Confederate prisoners for military service in the west in exchange for their freedom. David became a "Galvanized Yankee" in Company B Third U. S. Infantry Volunteers. Ordered to Dept. of Missouri, arriving at Fort Kearney, Neb., April 9, 1865, and assigned to duty in the District of Nebraska and Colorado. Stationed by Companies. "A" and "B" at Fort Kearney, "E" and "F" at Fort Rankin, "G" and "H" at Julesburg Junction, Colo., and "C" and "D" at Cottonwood protecting overland mail routes from Indian attacks. Skirmish at Elm Creek May 20, 1865. Mustered out November 29, 1865.
..........................................................................................................................................................................

MAY 18, 1865.--Skirmish with Indians near Fort Kearny, Nebr. Ter.

Report of Lieut. William H. Barlett, Third U. S. Volunteers.

POST COTTONWOOD, NEBR. TER., May 22, 1865.
SIR: I have the honor to report that I have received information by letter
from Jefferson Fields, late fifth sergeant of this company, to the effect
that on the 10th instant he left Fort Leavenworth, Kans., in charge of
a detachment of men for Fort Kearny, Nebr. Ter.; and on the 18th
instant was attacked by Indians and lost 2 men killed and 6 wounded, he
being one of the latter, having received an arrow through his left
shoulder. among the killed was Private William J. Mers, of
this company, and among the wounded, beside the above mentioned,
was Private Rinaldo Hedges, also of this company. One of the wounded
men was scalped. The wounded are at Fort Kearny. Fields further states
that before leaving Fort Leavenworth he made application for arms, but
none were furnished him. In my opinion, the officer who ordered him
away from Fort Leavenworth, unarmed as he was, to make a march of
nearly 300 miles through a country known for the most part to be
infested by a savage and barbarous enemy, and unaccompanied by any
armed force whatever, committed a grievous error, and should be held
to account for so flagrant a breach of humanity, not to say neglect of
duty; and I beg leave to call the attention of the commanding officer of
the regiment to the facts in the case, and respectfully request that he
take the matter in hand and adopt such measures as will tend to attach
the a blame where it belongs, so that the guilty as well as the innocent
may share in the sufferings caused by some unworthy official dignitary's
mismanagement. It is too bad to have men thus massacred and not
institute an inquiry into the primary cause thereof and have the guilty
ones punished.

Hoping that action will be taken in the matter, I am, very respectfully,
your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. BARTLETT,
First Lieut., Third Regt. U. S. Volunteers, Cmdg. Company C.

Lieut. J. L. CROWLEY,
Adjutant 3d Regt. U. S. Vols., Julesburg, Colo, Ter.

[First indorsement.]

HDQRS. THIRD REGT. U. S. VOLUNTEER INFANTRY,
Julesburg, Colo. Ter., May 24, 1865.

Respectfully forwarded to headquarters District of the Plains, for the
consideration of the brigadier-general commanding.

C. H. MCNALLY,
Col., Cmdg. Regt.

[Second indorsement.]

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF THE PLAINS,
Julesburg, Colo. Ter., May 27, 1865.

Respectfully referred to Col. R. R. Livingston, commanding East
Sub-District of the Plains, who will cause an immediate and searching
investigation of within alleged circumstance and return papers to this
office.

By command of Brig.-Gen. Connor:

GEO. F. PRICE,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen.

[Third indorsement.]

HDQRS. EAST SUB-DISTRICT OF THE PLAINS,
Fort Kearny, Nebr. Ter., May 29, 1865.

Respectfully returned, with the information that an investigation has
been had, and the report forwarded to headquarters District of the Plains
on the 27th instant.

R. R. LIVINGSTON,
Col. First Nebraska Veteran Cavalry, Cmdg. Sub-District.


Source: Official Records
CHAP. LX.] SKIRMISH NEAR FORT KEARNY, NEBR. TER. PAGE 273-101
[Series I. Vol. 48. Part I, Reports, Correspondence, Etc. Serial No. 101.]



The following (along with David's photo) submitted by David DeLafayette Franklin's great great grandson, Robert H. Fickies:

Later in life, his military pension application would show that he was 75 percent disabled, with vision, hearing, and back injuries. There was a very difficult process in making this transition from Confederate prisoner of war to the ranks of the Union army as a "Galvanized Yankee." These men knew that by volunteering for the Union Army, they would be shunned by their former comrades, and after the war, they were frequently shunned by Union and Confederate Veterans alike and most were not granted pensions from the Unites States Government. However, these men endured trials and tribulations well beyond the prisons, and their exploits in the American Territories out west were trying in themselves and, in the end, many of these men provided good and loyal service in the name of the United States on its frontier. David DeLafayette Franklin died in 1901, in Carroll County, Arkansas.

david d franklin confederate.jpg

david d franklin union.jpg

Notice the Federal Pension Office wanted to also know about his Confederate Service :

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franklin pension.jpg
 
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TnFed

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Good post Glenn. I take it he was in the 3rd TN. "Mounted" Infantry CSA? Off the top of my head, I believe that while East TN was a hotbed of Unionist, not one Union regiment was raised from Polk County. As we both know McMinn County was a pretty hairy place even up until our parents time. I would say he was a pretty brave man. I would have headed to the hills after Vicksburg, a lot of men did.
James
 
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3rd TN. "Mounted" Infantry CSA?
I believe they were mounted after Vicksburg. Polk County was one of only 6 east Tennessee Counties to vote in the majority for secession. My home county, Sullivan was another. Unionists called Sullivan, "little Confederacy". The other four were, Meigs, Monroe, Rhea, and Sequatchie. Still was a lot of Unionism in all six ! I hope to post some on the Union 3rd Tn Mounted here soon. Found some soldiers photos recently.
 
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TnFed

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That would be great as we had ancestors who were officers in that regiment. My g g uncle James Morrow being a 1st Lieutenant in Company G and your cousin, Captain Gray commanding Company H. Both companies along with C Company spending a lot of time chasing J J Kirkland. I was in Monroe County some years back.
.Tellicoe Plains. Some of the descendants of the 3rd CSA were doing a reenactment there, I got to talking to them and they invited me to a picnic where the Iron Works was during the war.
 
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That would be great as we had ancestors who were officers in that regiment. My g g uncle James Morrow being a 1st Lieutenant in Company G and your cousin, Captain Gray commanding Company H. Both companies along with C Company spending a lot of time chasing J J Kirkland. I was in Monroe County some years back.
.Tellicoe Plains. Some of the descendants of the 3rd CSA were doing a reenactment there, I got to talking to them and they invited me to a picnic where the Iron Works was during the war.
There were lines of my Land, Gray, and Isbell ancestor/relatives that left Wilkes County, NC in the 1830's and settled in Monroe County, TN. I've posted several times about my Confederate cousin, Thomas Charles Land from Wilkes County. I've got copies of 3 journals he kept. The first is when he taught school for a year in Monroe in 1850. He spent a lot of time with his Tennessee cousins. The 2nd he kept during the war. A third is about most of his remaining years in Oregon territory after the war. I'm afraid Thomas was one "UN-reconstructed" Rebel !!! If I had never got into Civil War/genealogy research, I'd never known about the Monroe County kinfolk !
 
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@TnFed and I have "talked Civil War" for several years now. We met on another site and discovered we had east Tennessee Unionist ancestors that served together in the 90-day Union 3rd Tennessee Mounted Infantry in 1864. I've recently discovered photos (a rarity indeed), of three other members of this unit.

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Stephen Charles Pace Union 3rd TN MTD Infantry.jpg

Stephen Charles Pace of Joseph M. Greer's Company E (Blount County). July-August, 1864; mustered at Knoxville, August 11, 1864. Unfortunately, Stephen died of typhoid in September. His widow, Dovey, applied for a widow's pension on May 28, 1874.

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Cary Hogue Union 3rd TN MTD Infantry.jpg

Carey Jackson Hogue enrolled with his 40 year-old father, Daniel Hogue into Joseph Divine's & Timothy Lyons, Co. “C”. Mustered at Loudon, August 10, 1864. Some of the men were from North Carolina; Tennesseans from Blount and Monroe Counties. Carey reportedly lied about his age, claiming to be 18, he may have been as young as 15 if census records are correct.

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William Monroe Hogue brother to the above mentioned Daniel Hogue and uncle to Carey. He served with his brother and nephew in Company "C", 3rd Tennessee Mounted Infantry, Volunteers, enlisting on August 05, 1864, at the ripe-old age of 45. While encountering the enemy in North Carolina on November 01, 1864, William was wounded when a minnie ball struck the tree beside him, sending bark into his face and destroying his right eye. He was discharged after his term of service had expired on December 22, 1864 at Knoxville. [Patrick Hogue has photo of William M. Hogue - It shows an obvious glass eye]. William returned home to Brick Mill, Blount County, Tennessee and was treated for his injury there by Dr. Ross Lane. William arrived home just a month before the birth of his next son Charles Sherman Hogue. William M. Hogue also served prior to the Civil War i the "Florida War", or "Seminole War".
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TnFed

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@TnFed and I have "talked Civil War" for several years now. We met on another site and discovered we had east Tennessee Unionist ancestors that served together in the 90-day Union 3rd Tennessee Mounted Infantry in 1864. I've recently discovered photos (a rarity indeed), of three other members of this unit.

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View attachment 303190
Stephen Charles Pace of Joseph M. Greer's Company E (Blount County). July-August, 1864; mustered at Knoxville, August 11, 1864. Unfortunately, Stephen died of typhoid in September. His widow, Dovey, applied for a widow's pension on May 28, 1874.

View attachment 303196

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View attachment 303191
Carey Jackson Hogue enrolled with his 40 year-old father, Daniel Hogue into Joseph Divine's & Timothy Lyons, Co. “C”. Mustered at Loudon, August 10, 1864. Some of the men were from North Carolina; Tennesseans from Blount and Monroe Counties. Carey reportedly lied about his age, claiming to be 18, he may have been as young as 15 if census records are correct.

View attachment 303200

View attachment 303194
William Monroe Hogue brother to the above mentioned Daniel Hogue and uncle to Carey. He served with his brother and nephew in Company "C", 3rd Tennessee Mounted Infantry, Volunteers, enlisting on August 05, 1864, at the ripe-old age of 45. While encountering the enemy in North Carolina on November 01, 1864, William was wounded when a minnie ball struck the tree beside him, sending bark into his face and destroying his right eye. He was discharged after his term of service had expired on December 22, 1864 at Knoxville. [Patrick Hogue has photo of William M. Hogue - It shows an obvious glass eye]. William returned home to Brick Mill, Blount County, Tennessee and was treated for his injury there by Dr. Ross Lane. William arrived home just a month before the birth of his next son Charles Sherman Hogue. William M. Hogue also served prior to the Civil War i the "Florida War", or "Seminole War".
View attachment 303195
Thanks for the pictures. One of the many things that I have wanted to do is write a tract on Timothy Lyons. One of my favorite "Rogues" from the civil war. He wasn't bloodthirsty like the Confederateds Gatewood and Kirkland or the Unionist Lovingood and Lane. But he was an opportunist to say the least. He deserted with two others from a Wisconsin Cavalry unit and all three were commissioned as officers in the 3rd by Andrew Johnson. Described by NC Confederates as a one-eye Irish mercenary, Lyons was still taking prisoners over a month after Lee's surrender. On what authority I do not know. Thanks again for the pictures.
 
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Thanks for the pictures. One of the many things that I have wanted to do is write a tract on Timothy Lyons. One of my favorite "Rogues" from the civil war. He wasn't bloodthirsty like the Confederateds Gatewood and Kirkland or the Unionist Lovingood and Lane. But he was an opportunist to say the least. He deserted with two others from a Wisconsin Cavalry unit and all three were commissioned as officers in the 3rd by Andrew Johnson. Described by NC Confederates as a one-eye Irish mercenary, Lyons was still taking prisoners over a month after Lee's surrender. On what authority I do not know. Thanks again for the pictures.
Remember this from 2007 ? http://www.history-sites.net/cgi-bin/bbs62x/wicwmb/webbbs_config.pl?md=read;id=343 He's referring to Hogue men in the previous post !

https://civilwartalk.com/threads/re...s-in-the-civil-war.129343/page-7#post-1895130

Lyons' pension application would be some interesting reading. I'm assuming the desertion charge was eventually removed from his record. He apparently resettled in Iowa after the war. His widow applied for a pension from the State of Washington. It must have took some effort and some time to get the desertion charge dropped if indeed it was. Federal pension index cards don't tell if a pension was approved or rejected, but it doesn't seem likely his widow would have applied had he not been approved.

lyons 1891.jpg

lyons 1901.jpg

lyons 1904.jpg
 
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TnFed

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Remember this from 2007 ? http://www.history-sites.net/cgi-bin/bbs62x/wicwmb/webbbs_config.pl?md=read;id=343 He's referring to Hogue men in the previous post !

https://civilwartalk.com/threads/re...s-in-the-civil-war.129343/page-7#post-1895130

Lyons' pension application would be some interesting reading. I'm assuming the desertion charge was eventually removed from his record. He apparently resettled in Iowa after the war. His widow applied for a pension from the State of Washington. It must have took some effort and some time to get the desertion charge dropped if indeed it was. Federal pension index cards don't tell if a pension was approved or rejected, but it doesn't seem likely his widow would have applied had he not been approved.

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Twelve and Fifhteen years. Time flys. I have Lyons pension and Barkers research. He did get the desertion charge expunged from his record and the thanks of Congress. His wife did receive a pension. The luck of the Irish.

I saw in my old posting that his fellow deserter Culvert was 1st Lt. With Company H. I wonder if he took over after the Kirkland gang killed your ancestor Captain Gray or was Gray killed after the 3rd was disbanded? I don't remember the time frame off hand.
 



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