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oldpete63

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Unsung Heroes of Gettysburg.
Programs of the Fifth Annual Gettysburg Seminar. March 23, 1996.
Gettysburg, PA: Gettysburg National Military Park.
Publication Date: 1996

PART 1
CASUALTIES OF WAR:
The Effects of the Battle of Gettysburg Upon the Men and
Families of the 69th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment
by D. SCOTT HARTWIG
 

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oldpete63

Sergeant Major
Joined
Jan 17, 2012
Messages
2,060
Unsung Heroes of Gettysburg.
Programs of the Fifth Annual Gettysburg Seminar. March 23, 1996.

Gettysburg, PA: Gettysburg National Military Park.
Publication Date: 1996

PART 2
THE HANNAH ROPES FAMILY OF
MASSACHUSETTS:
A Struggle for American Values
by REBECCA LYONS
 

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oldpete63

Sergeant Major
Joined
Jan 17, 2012
Messages
2,060
Unsung Heroes of Gettysburg.
Programs of the Fifth Annual Gettysburg Seminar. March 23, 1996.
Gettysburg, PA: Gettysburg National Military Park.
Publication Date: 1996

PART 3
BLACKS IN BLUE AND GRAY:
The African-American Contribution to the Waging of the Civil War
by Dr. Edward C. Smith
Professor, American University
 

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oldpete63

Sergeant Major
Joined
Jan 17, 2012
Messages
2,060
Unsung Heroes of Gettysburg.
Programs of the Fifth Annual Gettysburg Seminar. March 23, 1996.
Gettysburg, PA: Gettysburg National Military Park.
Publication Date: 1996

PART 4
WE SAVED THE LINE FROM BEING BROKEN:
Freeman McGilvery, John Bigelow, Charles Reed and the Battle
of Gettysburg
by Eric Campbell
 

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oldpete63

Sergeant Major
Joined
Jan 17, 2012
Messages
2,060
Unsung Heroes of Gettysburg.
Programs of the Fifth Annual Gettysburg Seminar. March 23, 1996.
Gettysburg, PA: Gettysburg National Military Park.
Publication Date: 1996

PART 5
MEN OF ACTION:
The Unsung Heroes of East Cavalry Field
by Thomas Holbrook
 

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oldpete63

Sergeant Major
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Jan 17, 2012
Messages
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A Gettysburg Tour With John Burns :

I found this article in Cornell University’s “Making Of America” series – the edition of Atlantic Monthly Magazine’s November, 1865 edition. Briefly, it’s a 9 page article that a J.T. Trowbridge wrote concerning a trip he made to Gettysburg in August, 1865, and had John Burns as his battlefield guide. The author is very descriptive of the landscape and what was still visible in 1865. Nice little read for a Saturday afternoon. For those interested, below is the link (I could not copy & paste) and it’s the 4th article from the bottom titled “The Field Of Gettysburg” by J.T. Trowbridge.

http://ebooks.library.cornell.edu/c...g;view=toc;idno=atla0016-5;node=atla0016-5:14
 

Mosin

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Civil War Photo Contest
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Location
under the bridge
Studies by Kathleen Georg

Accuracy of the Elliot map:
http://www.gdg.org/Research/BattlefieldHistories/elliot.htm

A Fitting And Expresive Memorial: Development of GNMP
http://www.gdg.org/Research/BattlefieldHistories/kghfitin.html

This Grand National Enterprise: Origins of Soldiers National Cemetery and Gettysburg Battlefield Memorial Association
http://www.gdg.org/Research/BattlefieldHistories/kghgrand.html

Edward McPherson Farm: Historical Study
http://www.gdg.org/Research/BattlefieldHistories/farmint.html

Longstreet's Headquarter's Reexamined:
http://www.gdg.org/Research/BattlefieldHistories/kghhdqr.html

The Development And Care Of The Soldiers' National Cemetery Enclosure At Gettysburg:
http://www.gdg.org/Research/BattlefieldHistories/enctoc.html
 

oldpete63

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Jan 17, 2012
Messages
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Gettysburg Tales - Post 1

Major Henry Kyd Douglas recalled " While we were near Chambersburg, a little incident occurred which indicated what a tender memory and stern sense of duty General Jackson had left behind him. Captain Sandy Garber, Assistant Quartermaster of the Second Corps, had been spending the evening in Chambersburg and was returning late at night to his camp. He was halted at the outposts. Having neither pass nor countersign, in his dilemna, he produced an old pass signed ny General Jackson from his pocketbook and handed it with great confidence to the sentinel on post. The trusty fellow managed to read it by the light of a match and lingered over the signature. Then, as the light went out, he handed it back and looking toward the stars beyond, he said, sadly and firmly, "Captain, you can go to Heaven on that paper, but you can't pass this post."
(From "On The Bloodstained Field" - Gregory A. Coco)
Gettysburg Tales - Post 2
A Confederate soldier reported the next story from his experiences in the Gettysburg Campaign.
"It was just before the Battle of Gettysburg and our regiment was camped on the suburbs of a pretty Pennsylvania town. A stream was near the camp, and one afternoon I suggested to some of the boys in my company that we take a bath and a swim. They took to the idea, and likewise to the water, in quick time. There were no in the houses in the immediate vicinity, except for one on a hillside about half a mile away belonging to an old spinster lady.
"We had been swimming for a while when a boy trudged into camp in search of the captain. He had a note from the old maid, which read:
"Dear sir : I wish you would order your men out of the stream. I can see them plainly through my brother's field glasses! "
(From "On The Bloodstained Field" - Gregory A. Coco)
Gettysburg Tales - Post 3
A highly controversial story to come out of the Battle of Gettysburg, may or may not have occured on July 1, but was reported by Lt. A.B. Smith of the 76th New York Infantry. He states that many loyal citizens handed out water and food to the passing Union troops.​
One, a "nameless heroine", who with a cup in each hand, and tears of sympathy streaming down her cheeks, was pierced by a Rebel ball and fell down beside her water pail. He goes on to say that her name, regretfully, cannot be handed down to posterity.​
However, a pension was awarded in 1899 to Lizzie Waltz, a woman who claimed and evidently proved that she was wounded during the Gettysburg Campaign. Lizzie Sweitzer Waltz was a domestic, employed and living in Hanover, Pennsylvania.​
From "On The Bloodstained Field" by Gergory A. Coco​
 

oldpete63

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Jan 17, 2012
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Some Horse Waste Gettysburg Statistics

Here are some interesting statistics given in a recent talk and printed in our Civil War Roundtable newsletter. I can't vouch for their accuracy, but even a little fluctuation in them still leaves an impressive facet in the understanding of the Battle of Gettysburg.

Horses...........

Between the two armies there were approximately 72,243 horses present. Of these, nearly 3,000 - 5,000 were killed.

Each horse requires 10 gallons of water per day, making the water needs for just the horses 722,430 gallons per day .

Each horse normally consumed twelve pounds of grain (oats preferably ) and fourteen pounds of hay per day, making those requirements 866,916 pounds of grain per day and 1,011,402 pounds of hay.

Each horse produces twelve to fifteen pounds of manure per day. Using an average of thirteen and a half pounds that makes close to 975,281 pounds of manure per day!... for the three or four days the armies were there.

And each horse produces two gallons of the other stuff (urine ) per day creating a tidal wave of 144,486 gallons per day.

Whew !

Add this to the discharges of the 180,000 men present and it must have been a pretty smelly place .
 

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