Reconstruction: Voices from America's First Great Struggle for Racial Equality

shermans_march

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Brooks D Simpson (Editor)
Library of America (January 30th, 2018)

There are few periods in American history more consequential but less understood than Reconstruction, the tumultuous twelve years after Appomattox, when the battered nation sought to reconstitute itself and confront the legacy of two centuries of slavery. This Library of America anthology brings together more than one hundred contemporary letters, diary entries, interviews, petitions, testimonies, and newspaper and magazine articles by well-known figures--Frederick Douglass, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, Andrew Johnson, Thaddeus Stevens, Ulysses S. Grant, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Mark Twain, Albion Tourgée--as well as by dozens of ordinary men and women, black and white, northern and southern, to tell the story of our nation's first attempt to achieve racial equality. Through their eyes readers experience the fierce contest between President Andrew Johnson and the Radical Republicans resulting in the nation's first presidential impeachment; the adoption of the revolutionary Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments; the first achievements of black political power; and the murderous terrorism of the Klan and other groups that, combined with northern weariness, indifference, and hostility, eventually resulted in the restoration of white supremacy in the South. Throughout, Americans confront the essential questions left unresolved by the defeat of secession: What system of labor would replace slavery, and what would become of the southern plantations? Would the war end in the restoration of a union of sovereign states, or in the creation of a truly national government? What would citizenship mean after emancipation, and what civil rights would the freed people gain? Would suffrage be extended to African American men, and to all women?

https://www.amazon.com/Reconstruction-Americas-Struggle-Equality-Library/dp/1598535552/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1515031766&sr=1-2&refinements=p_n_publication_date:1250228011

Disclaimer: This post is neither a recommendation nor solicitation by CivilWarTalk or Shermans_March. It is solely for informational purposes.

@chellers I hope you don't mind me borrowing your formatting. I wanted to do it correctly.
 
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Hawkeye Brehm

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View attachment 172558
Brooks Simpson (Author)
Library of America (January 30th, 2018)

There are few periods in American history more consequential but less understood than Reconstruction, the tumultuous twelve years after Appomattox, when the battered nation sought to reconstitute itself and confront the legacy of two centuries of slavery. This Library of America anthology brings together more than one hundred contemporary letters, diary entries, interviews, petitions, testimonies, and newspaper and magazine articles by well-known figures--Frederick Douglass, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, Andrew Johnson, Thaddeus Stevens, Ulysses S. Grant, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Mark Twain, Albion Tourgée--as well as by dozens of ordinary men and women, black and white, northern and southern, to tell the story of our nation's first attempt to achieve racial equality. Through their eyes readers experience the fierce contest between President Andrew Johnson and the Radical Republicans resulting in the nation's first presidential impeachment; the adoption of the revolutionary Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments; the first achievements of black political power; and the murderous terrorism of the Klan and other groups that, combined with northern weariness, indifference, and hostility, eventually resulted in the restoration of white supremacy in the South. Throughout, Americans confront the essential questions left unresolved by the defeat of secession: What system of labor would replace slavery, and what would become of the southern plantations? Would the war end in the restoration of a union of sovereign states, or in the creation of a truly national government? What would citizenship mean after emancipation, and what civil rights would the freed people gain? Would suffrage be extended to African American men, and to all women?

https://www.amazon.com/Reconstruction-Americas-Struggle-Equality-Library/dp/1598535552/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1515031766&sr=1-2&refinements=p_n_publication_date:1250228011

Disclaimer: This post is neither a recommendation nor solicitation by CivilWarTalk or Shermans_March. It is solely for informational purposes.

*@Chellers I hope you don't mind me borrowing your formatting.
Awesome summary. At some point in the distant future, I'll have to do an in-depth study of Reconstruction.
 

shermans_march

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Awesome review. At some point in the distant future, I'll have to do an in-depth study of Reconstruction.
Not a review. I just copied and pasted the summary. This is mainly to show a new release coming out soon. I will be getting a copy though. I wonder if @Bee is. :smile: @Jimklag and @huskerblitz have expressed interest on the period in past discussions.
 

Bee

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I will be putting up a review when I finish it.
Since this book is comprised of essays/letters/etc that bind together, yet, each stand alone, I might be inspired to comment as I go along (as time permits) I like these collections for travel. Unfortunately, since this is The Year of the Doorstop , this book - like others - may have to be surgically reduced for travel convenience.
 

Pat Young

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Since this book is comprised of essays/letters/etc that bind together, yet, each stand alone, I might be inspired to comment as I go along (as time permits) I like these collections for travel. Unfortunately, since this is The Year of the Doorstop , this book - like others - may have to be surgically reduced for travel convenience.
Kindle!
 

shermans_march

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Since this book is comprised of essays/letters/etc that bind together, yet, each stand alone, I might be inspired to comment as I go along (as time permits) I like these collections for travel. Unfortunately, since this is The Year of the Doorstop , this book - like others - may have to be surgically reduced for travel convenience.
At least LOA books are quite travel friendly, since they are smaller than the average book. Tiny print though.
 

Bee

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WSJ book review:


By
Allen C. Guelzo
Feb. 2, 2018 5:24 p.m. ET
27 COMMENTS

During the 12 years that we identify as the era of Reconstruction—from 1865 to 1877—the American nation struggled up from the wreckage of the Civil War and tried to re-attach the 11 Southern states that had bloodily amputated themselves to form the Confederate States of America. At the time, there were not many how-to models for such an effort.

Civil wars are always the most protracted and embittering of human conflicts. In most cases, postwar reconstructions are consumed by waves of executions and decades of simmering unrest. After the American Civil War, the challenge was made even more daunting by the brutal assassination of Abraham Lincoln—just at the moment when he was about to embark on the hard work of, as he put it, binding up the nation’s wounds. That work was made yet harder by the uncertainty surrounding the future of the 3.9 million slaves whose emancipation had become the great issue of the war.

Brooks Simpson’s “Reconstruction: Voices From America’s First Great Struggle for Racial Equality” offers up speeches, letters, political commentary and other writings from the period to capture its conflicts, aspirations and lost ideals. The anthology is the 303rd volume to appear from the Library of America, a publishing project that is mostly devoted to America’s literary legacy—the work of novelists, poets, memoirists and journalists—but that includes volumes documenting notable historical eras as well.

More Here https://www.wsj.com/articles/review-the-reconstruction-eras-open-wound-1517610265 (click past the membership ad)
 

Pat Young

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WSJ book review:


By
Allen C. Guelzo
Feb. 2, 2018 5:24 p.m. ET
27 COMMENTS

During the 12 years that we identify as the era of Reconstruction—from 1865 to 1877—the American nation struggled up from the wreckage of the Civil War and tried to re-attach the 11 Southern states that had bloodily amputated themselves to form the Confederate States of America. At the time, there were not many how-to models for such an effort.

Civil wars are always the most protracted and embittering of human conflicts. In most cases, postwar reconstructions are consumed by waves of executions and decades of simmering unrest. After the American Civil War, the challenge was made even more daunting by the brutal assassination of Abraham Lincoln—just at the moment when he was about to embark on the hard work of, as he put it, binding up the nation’s wounds. That work was made yet harder by the uncertainty surrounding the future of the 3.9 million slaves whose emancipation had become the great issue of the war.

Brooks Simpson’s “Reconstruction: Voices From America’s First Great Struggle for Racial Equality” offers up speeches, letters, political commentary and other writings from the period to capture its conflicts, aspirations and lost ideals. The anthology is the 303rd volume to appear from the Library of America, a publishing project that is mostly devoted to America’s literary legacy—the work of novelists, poets, memoirists and journalists—but that includes volumes documenting notable historical eras as well.

More Here https://www.wsj.com/articles/review-the-reconstruction-eras-open-wound-1517610265 (click past the membership ad)
I am a quarter of the way through.
 

nitrofd

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I was at my favorite used book store this morning and did not find the titles I was looking for but I did find this one:

The Civil War and Reconstruction by David Herbert Donald,Jean Harvey Baker and Michael F.Holt.
This book was originated by James G.Randallstown but revised by Donald.
It says this is a text for College courses.
 

cash

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I was at my favorite used book store this morning and did not find the titles I was looking for but I did find this one:

The Civil War and Reconstruction by David Herbert Donald,Jean Harvey Baker and Michael F.Holt.
This book was originated by James G.Randallstown but revised by Donald.
It says this is a text for College courses.
It's a revision, but not much has been revised in it. Randall and Donald's edition, which was the second edition, published in 1969, is better because it includes an extensive annotated bibliography at the end.
 
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