Reconstruction: Discussion of Henry Louis Gates New Documentary

19thGeorgia

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I take it the Southerners were ready to believe everything they read?

Kevin Dally
They had been hearing the same for a long time.

"...the adoption of the measures I advocated at the outset of the war, the arming of the negroes, the slaves of the rebels, is the only way left on earth in which these rebels can be exterminated. They will find that they must treat those States now outside of the Union as conquered provinces and settle them with new men, and drive the present rebels as exiles from this country....They have such determination, energy, and endurance, that nothing but actual extermination or exile or starvation will ever induce them to surrender to this Government."—Thaddeus Stevens, U.S. House of Representatives, January 8, 1863

Why do you think Jubal Early wanted to hang him and “divide his bones, and send them to the several states as curiosities."
 

Tin cup

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They had been hearing the same for a long time.

"...the adoption of the measures I advocated at the outset of the war, the arming of the negroes, the slaves of the rebels, is the only way left on earth in which these rebels can be exterminated. They will find that they must treat those States now outside of the Union as conquered provinces and settle them with new men, and drive the present rebels as exiles from this country....They have such determination, energy, and endurance, that nothing but actual extermination or exile or starvation will ever induce them to surrender to this Government."—Thaddeus Stevens, U.S. House of Representatives, January 8, 1863

Why do you think Jubal Early wanted to hang him and “divide his bones, and send them to the several states as curiosities."
One man's opinion, did HE get THAT implemented during reconstruction? Did he lead all others to do what he claimed?

Kevin Dally
 

Andersonh1

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Of course the answer to OldSarge79's questions is, to quote my late and unlamented father, "Not just no, but H*LL NO!" And on further consideration since posting my above reply, in addition to the things I mentioned that went unsaid or unexplored I don't remember hearing either of the words carpetbagger or scallywag. I believe the likely reason nobody on the opposing side (that is, from the one taken by author Gates) was presented and/or examined is that it's easier to demonize your enemy if you present him as a faceless mass. (The KKK, to which all whites evidently belonged.) As I said before there are plenty of interesting and important persons and events of the 1865-1877 period of Congressional Reconstruction without having to once again Wave the Bloody Shirt of Jim Crow. This series is far less about Reconstruction than it is The Horrible Things the Poor Black Folks (Only) Suffered Under a Century of Oppression and as such I seriously doubt I'll bother with the rest of it.

This is what I expect from any modern history of Reconstruction, and I am rarely disappointed. I am still waiting for the well-rounded, all points of view given equal time, history of reconstruction. I doubt I'll ever get it.
 

James N.

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I have recorded parts 1 & 2, but I'm working so many hrs that if I sit for any length of time, I fall asleep!:frown: I thought it would be a series of broader range, not just on a black perspective.
What I have seen looks OK, but seen references to MODERN DAY black suffering, hoped it would be kept within the Reconstruction time period.:unsure:

Kevin Dally
It isn't on either count - just more of the same whining we've heard for the past half-century.
 
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CSA Today

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This is what I expect from any modern history of Reconstruction, and I am rarely disappointed. I am still waiting for the well-rounded, all points of view given equal time, history of reconstruction. I doubt I'll ever get it.
I doubt it too as long as political correctness trumps all dissident points of view. You need to look no further than the reaction here from some to anything emanating from the Abbeville Institue.
 

jackt62

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I just watched the first part of the Gates documentary. I thought it to be an important addition to our understanding of the Reconstruction era, which unfortunately, has not been given sufficient attention to in the American story.
 

huskerblitz

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I said the same thing in a different thread. Series was okay by itself, but it was really about the legacy of slavery and not so much a deep history of Reconstruction, which is what the series offered. So I was likewise disappointed in it from that aspect.
 

Pat Young

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From the Blog Muster:

https://www.journalofthecivilwarera...f-reconstruction-america-after-the-civil-war/

Some of the most celebrated experts on Reconstruction guide the viewer through this history. Especially notable is the expertise of scholars like Martha Jones, Kidada Williams, Kimberlé Crenshaw, and others who push the study of Reconstruction forward with new knowledge of citizenship, the law, and the lived experience of African Americans during Reconstruction, especially that of African American women. The film, however, does not rely only on “talking head”-style commentary by academic experts to move the narrative forward. In several scenes, Gates interviews historians, descendants of Reconstruction era leaders, clergy, and lawmakers. He engages them in discussion of not just their knowledge of the past, but also what the history of the era means to them today. For the viewer, this provides an intimate connection to the past as witness to a casual conversation, providing an intimate present-day understanding of the resonance of the era.
 
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