Reconstruction 150: The Liberty Place Monument In New Orleans

19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
[Pat Young blog:]
{The} memorializing {of} the dead of September 14, 1874 is described as a “holy duty” {by the people who created and celebrated the monument}. Of course, the monument does not memorialize all of the dead, only the White Leaguers and their supporters. We find this elision in Confederate monumentation as well.
...and Union monumentation too.

When people put up monuments - whether it's Union, Confederate or "White League" or any other league, nation or country
- they usually do not (or should I say never) put the names of the enemy on their monument.

That's just a given. I find it strange that someone would expect they would or should.
 

ForeverFree

Major
Joined
Feb 6, 2010
Location
District of Columbia
...and Union monumentation too.

When people put up monuments - whether it's Union, Confederate or "White League" or any other league, nation or country
- they usually do not (or should I say never) put the names of the enemy on their monument.

That's just a given. I find it strange that someone would expect they would or should.
You are correct, we should not expect that former Confederates/White Leaguers would commemorate black Union soldiers. Nor would we expect that the whites who controlled the government and public spaces in the state after the war would allow the commemoration of "the enemy."

Notably, the state of Louisiana produced more black Union soldiers than any other state; and it produced, I think, three of the first five or ten Union regiment, all from the New Orleans area. In terms of black soldiery, LA was the first with the most. Yet, in a state where the 1860 population was 47% African American, there was no monument to black Union men until one was built in Donaldsonville, LA, sometime after the year 2000 (I believe). To this day, there is still only one, if my research is right.

- Alan
 
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