Rebels from West Point

jgoodguy

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From the Book Rebels from West Point by Patterson. A list of West Point graduates that fought for the CSA. The list is from the book, biography will be from online sources. It will be from the Oldest to the Youngest.

Class of 1812.
Lewis Gustavus DeRussy


Colonel Lewis G. DeRussy was the oldest West Point graduate to serve in the Confederate Army. He was a veteran of the War of 1812 as well as a veteran of the Mexican War. DeRussy, A prominent engineer in civilian life, was the engineering officer in charge of the construction of the first fortifications at an earthen fort built to defend the Red River from naval invasion during the War Between the States. This fort is located in Avoyelles Parish, about three miles north of Marksville. Named for DeRussy, the fort construction began in November of 1862.

Lewis Gustave DeRussy was a little-known, but very active, participant in the early days of Louisiana’s history. He was a State senator, a State representative, a parish assessor, a civil engineer, and a loving husband and father. He was also a veteran of three wars – The War of 1812, the Mexican War, and the Civil War; the modern equivalent of which would be someone who had served on active duty as an officer in World War I, World War II, and Vietnam. Between wars, he was a Major General in the State Militia. He was involved in at least two duels and two shipwrecks. He was the oldest West Point graduate to serve as an officer in the Confederate Army, and he had three Confederate forts named after him. (He also had a brother and a nephew who were generals in the Union Army, and between the three of them there were five Fort DeRussys.) Some men are born with a silver spoon in their mouths. Lewis DeRussy was born with a steel bayonet in his

When a local historical society in Avoyelles Parish began efforts to restore Fort DeRussy and discovered the many contributions that DeRussy had made to early Louisiana history, descendants were contacted and asked for permission to move DeRussy’s remains to the fort. They enthusiastically agreed, and in September, 1999, DeRussy was reinterred on the grounds of the fort, with religious services and military honors, becoming the third person in his immediate family to be buried twice.

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Dedication of DeRussy Monument

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Color Guard With the Flags of the Confederacy
Major General Richard Taylor SCV Camp #1308
Shreveport, Louisiana

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Casket Bearers Representing The Three Wars In Which Colonel DeRussy Served

Also
Ft. DeRussy Facts - Friends of Fort DeRussy

Fort DeRussy (Louisiana)

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Edit:

Lewis G. DeRussy was born in the North but served the CSA.
 

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jgoodguy

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#3

jgoodguy

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Class of 1815

William Henry Chase

William Henry Chase (June 4, 1798 – February 8, 1870) was a Florida militia colonel during the events in early 1861 that led to the American Civil War (Civil War). On January 15, 1861, on behalf of the State and Governor of Florida, Colonel Chase demanded the surrender of Fort Pickens at Pensacola, Florida and of its U.S. Army garrison. Chase had designed and constructed the fort while he was a captain in the United States Army Corps of Engineers. Lieutenant Adam J. Slemmer, commander of the fort, refused the surrender demand. An informal truce between the administration of President James Buchanan and Florida officials, including their still sitting U.S. Senators, avoided military action at Pensacola until after the Battle of Fort Sumter in April 1861.

Chase was promoted to major general in the "Army of Florida" (Florida militia) a few days after his first demand for surrender of the fort. His entire military service to the emerging Confederate cause occurred during the secession crisis prior to the Battle of Fort Sumter. Chase repeated his surrender demand on January 18, 1861 but Fort Pickens was never surrendered to militia or Confederate States Army forces during the Civil War.

Chase, a United States Military Academy graduate, served in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers from 1815 to 1856. He attained the rank of major and became the senior officer of the engineers along the Gulf Coast of the United States, where he was responsible for design, construction and maintenance of a number of forts, including those below New Orleans and at Pensacola, Florida and Key West, Florida.
William Henry Chase - the Pensacola encyclopedia


William H. Chase​
200px-Whchase.png

Born June 4, 1798
Chase's Mills, Massachusetts
(now Buckfield, Maine)
Died
February 8, 1870
Pensacola
Occupation
Engineer, land developer


In 1828, the Army transferred Chase to Pensacola to oversee the construction of a fort to protect the new Navy Yard. The resulting venture, Fort Pickens, was situated on the western end of Santa Rosa Island and provided easy targeting of any ship entering Pensacola Pass.

The fort construction and subsequent military projects were a major boon to Pensacola's economy. After relying briefly on imported construction materials, Chase urged local businessmen to build their own brickyards using the available clay deposits. A rapid infusion of federal money allowed the nascent brick industry to grow quickly, but after more than 20 million bricks had been delivered by 1831, years ahead of the actual completion, the manufacturers still had millions of surplus bricks and few prospects for future contracts. Using his position as commanding engineer of the Gulf region,
Chase requested funding to construct further defenses that were "vitally needed" to protect Pensacola's harbor.[1] The resulting projects, Fort McRee on Perdido Key and a brick rebuilding of the Spanish Fort San Carlos de Barrancas (Fort Barrancas), were completed over the next several years. Chase also successfully lobbied for $106,000 in funding to dredge the waterway for heavier warships.[1]
Captain Chase continued to serve as chief engineer of Gulf coastal fortifications and was promoted to major on July 7, 1838. Among the fortifications he supervised were:
  • Fort Morgan at the mouth of Mobile Bay
  • Fort Jackson in Louisiana
  • Improvements at the mouth of the Mississippi
  • Fort Jefferson at the Dry Tortugas
  • Fort Zachary Taylor in Key West
Bricks from Pensacola's yards were exported for use in many of these projects, bolstering the local economy.
President Franklin Pierce appointed Chase superintendent of the United States Military Academy at West Point, but he resigned from duty on October 31, 1856, to remain in Pensacola as president of the Alabama and Florida Railroad Company.

Chase was promoted to brigadier general and later major general of the Florida forces, but due to his age and health, he had little active role in the war.
He died at his home at the southwest corner of Palafox and Wright Streets (now the site of Episcopal Day School) on February 8, 1870.

William Henry Chase was born in the North, but fought for the CSA.
 

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Samuel Cooper


Samuel Cooper (June 12, 1798–December 3, 1876) was a career United States Army officer, serving during the Second Seminole War and the Mexican-American War. Although little-known today, Cooper was also the highest ranking Confederate general during the American Civil War. After the conflict, he remained in Virginia as a farmer.


Samuel Cooper
Born​
June 12, 1798​
Died​
December 3, 1876 (aged 78)​

Civil War service

At the beginning of the Civil War, Cooper's loyalties were with the South. His wife's family was from Virginia, and he had a close friendship with Jefferson Davis, who had also been U.S. Secretary of War.[7] One of his last official acts as Adjutant General of the U.S. Army was to sign an order dismissing Brig. Gen. David E. Twiggs from the army. Twiggs had surrendered his command and supplies in Texas to the Confederacy (and was shortly thereafter made a Confederate major general.) This order was dated March 1, 1861, and Cooper resigned six days later. He traveled to Montgomery, Alabama, at the time the Confederacy's capital, to join the Confederate States Army.[3]

On reaching Montgomery, Cooper was immediately given a commission as a brigadier general on March 16, 1861.[4] He served as both Adjutant General and Inspector General of the Confederate Army, a post he held until the end of the war. Cooper provided much needed organization and knowledge to the fledgling Confederate War Department, drawing on his years performing such duties as Adjutant General of the U.S. Army.[8]

On May 16, 1861, Cooper was promoted to full general in the Confederate Army.[4] He was one of five men promoted to the grade at that time, and one of only seven during the war, but with the earliest date of rank. Thus, despite his relative obscurity today, he outranked such luminaries as Albert Sidney Johnston, Robert E. Lee, Joseph E. Johnston, and P.G.T. Beauregard.[9] Cooper reported directly to Confederate President Jefferson Davis."[3] At the war's end in 1865, Cooper surrendered and was paroled on May 3 at Charlotte, North Carolina.[4]
Samuel Cooper was born in the North, but fought for the CSA.
 

jgoodguy

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Richard B. Lee

Richard B. Lee: Thirty years in the Artillery, he fought in the Second Seminole War.; Chief of Commissariat of the Pacific Division for nearly ten years.

Major Richard B. Lee, US commissary of subsistence, May 9, 1861 Resigned.
General Beauregard made but one demand on me (July 8th, by a telegram which I have) for a commissary of the old service. Lieutenant-Colonel Richard B. Lee was added; no one was removed.
Amnesty Petition of Richard B. Lee, June 12, 1865

Richard B. Lee was excluded from amnesty due to the fact that he resigned his commission in the US Army and went on to serve as a lieutenant colonel in the Confederate army. Lee worked to underscore his meritorious service in the US Army prior to the Civil War, highlighting the fact that he had wounded, promoted because of merit, and recognized for "gallant conduct." He also explained that he was essentially forced out of the US Army because he became an "object of suspicion" and was "virtually expelled from service." He also claimed that he was not to blame for the political atmosphere that led to secession.
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1862 Confederate Army Requisition For Provisions. One page, 6.5” x 3.75”, in pencil, dated May 28, 1862, mounted (via glue) to a larger paper leaf, toned else in very good condition. The requisition reads in full: “Orders from Col. R. B. Lee to/ turn over to Capt. Shaaff/ 1600.000 Bacon to be shipped/ to Corinth & other points/ O. C. Boone/ Commissary Ajut. CSA/ May 28/62”. The colonel in question must surely be Richard B. Lee who was assigned to the Confederate general staff.
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#10
Class of 1817
Angus W. McDonald

173
(Born Va.)
Angus W. McDonald
(Ap'd Va.)

Military History. — Cadet of the Military Academy, July 30, 1814, to July 17, 1817, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to
Third Lieut., Corps of Artillery, July 17, 1817.
Second Lieut., 7th Infantry, Feb. 13, 1818.
First Lieut., 7th Infantry, Apr. 1, 1818.
Served: in garrison at New Orleans, La., 1817, — and Mobile Bay, Ala., 1818.
Resigned, Jan. 31, 1819.
Civil History. — Fur Trader of Missouri Company, 1819‑25. Counselor at Law, Romney, Va., 1825‑61. Brig.‑General, Virginia Militia, 1840‑61.
Joined in the Rebellion of 1861-66 against the United States,a and
Died, Jan. 1, 1865, at Richmond, Va.: Aged 62.

As with other Confederate officers, Cullum's Register omits his war record; he rose to the rank of Colonel and was a prisoner of war.
The Glengarry McDonalds of Virginia (1911)

The following material is in the public domain and not copyrighted.

In June, 1861, I received from the Confederate Government the appointment of Colonel of Cavalry, in the P. A. C. S. with orders to raise and organize companies of volunteers for a particular service. My first service in the field was in Hampshire County, Virginia, and commenced June, 1861. About the 18th July, I left Hampshire with my command and did not return till about the last of August. On the 25th or 26th of October, my force of cavalry, becoming dismayed and panic-stricken by the presence of some ten times their number (of all arms) without having a man killed or wounded, retreated from Romney, leaving my entire baggage- train to be captured by the enemy. At the time of this disaster and for several months previous there- to, I was so disabled by rheumatism as to be able only with great pain and difficulty to mount my horse.

Early in November I was relieved from cavalry service and assigned to post duty and from that time till I was captured did no service in the field. On the 13th of last June I was in command at Lexington, Rockbridge County, Virginia. On the morning of that day I learned that Gen. McCausland did not expect to attempt the permanent defense of that post against the army under Gen. Hunter, then advancing against it. Having no troops under my command, and having already sent the Commissary and Quartermaster's stores away, and being unwillng to impose upon Gen. McCausland's small force the care of an invalid, I determined to shift for myself and as best I could escape capture.

I had provided myself with an ambulance, a pair of horses and driver, and had it loaded with my bedding, wearing apparel, and public and private papers as well as all the arms I had, intending to defend myself as long as I was able, against any squads of stragglers, marauders or scouting parties who might chance to come upon me. I aimed to keep as far from the line of the march of your army as I could. About an hour before the fire was set to the bridge opposite Lexington, I left there in my ambulance. The negro driver who had been sent by the Quartermaster to drive the ambulance, failing to make his appearance, my son Harry, a youth just turned sixteen, and who had been my nurse for nearly the whole of the preceding twelve months, helping me to dress and undress, became also my driver. Using my best judgment to avoid the route upon which Hunter's force would advance, I went that day to Mr. Wilson's, residing between the roads, leading, one to the natural bridge, and the other to Buchanan. Spending the night there I learned next day that the enemy would probably go by Buchanan, at least with part of their forces. I selected a place for concealment and defense and with Mr. Wilson, his servants, wagons, &c., moved to it the next day. It was about three miles and a half from the road leading to Buchanan, by which Hunter's force marched to that place. On the day that Hunter entered Buchanan about 12 o'clock, Lieut. Lewis and private Blake charged with a war shout upon my camp. They were fired upon and repulsed but returned about sun-down in force (as Capt. Martin- dale and Lieut. Lewis afterwards informed me) about twenty-two in number, and again attacked my camp. After fighting them till my gun stock was broken and my right hand paralyzed by a bullet wound, I surrendered myself and son as prisoners of war.

Through the instrumentality of General Hitchcock, Commissioner for the exchange of prisoners, Col. McDonald was finally released from prison and returned to Richmond the 7th of November, 1864. The shock which his system had received from the torture inflicted by his captors left him barely strength enough to reach Richmond. And perhaps the great physical torture with which he was racked, w^as small in comparison with the sense of mortifi- cation, which almost broke his proud heart. A week following his return to Richmond he was
taken seriously ill, and from this attack he never recovered. On December 1st, 1864, he died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Thos. C. Green,
Angus W. McDonald

HD_mcDonaldAngus.jpg
 

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#11
Class of 1820
Edward G. Butler.

Edward G. W. Butler:
Ten years of apparently routine assignments; he resigned, and was a Louisiana planter for the rest of his long life, except for a year back in the Army during the Mexican War.
EDWARD G. W. BUTLER.

240. Born Tennessee. Appointed Tennessee. 9.
(His son, E. G. W. Butler, Major Eleventh Louisiana Infantry, was killed at Belmont, Mo., November 7, 1861, but no trace of his father being in C. S. A. Cullum says he was in C.S.A.)

Note. The Cullum reference above does not say that he was CSA.

A June 9,1861 letter refers to him as ex military.
 

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John H Winder.

Major and Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel John H. Winder, 3rd Artillery, April 27, 1861

John H. Winder: Best-known today as the Confederate general in charge of the prison camps in which so many Union soldiers died under terrible conditions.

John H. Winder


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American Civil War


Winder chose to follow the Confederate cause and resigned his U.S. Army commission on April 27, 1861. He was appointed a colonel in the Confederate Army infantry on March 16. He was then promoted to brigadier general on June 21 and the next day was made Assistant Inspector General of the Camps of Instruction that were in the Confederacy's capital of Richmond, Virginia, a post he would hold until October 21.[2] In addition to his duties involving prisons, he was responsible for dealing with deserters, local law enforcement, and for a short time setting the commodity prices for the residents of a city dealing with a doubled population.[6] During this time he commanded Libby Prison in Richmond as well.
In April 1864, Winder appointed Capt. Henry Wirz commandant a new prison camp in Georgia called Camp Sumter, better known as the infamous Andersonville Prison. Winder commanded the Department of Henrico for much of the war, lasting until May 5, 1864. He then commanded the 2nd District of the Department of North Carolina & Southern Virginia from May 25 until June 7.[3] Ten days later he briefly commanded Camp Sumter himself, lasting until July 26. Winder then was given command of all military prisons in Georgia as well as those in Alabama until November 21, when he was put in charge of the Confederate Bureau of Prison Camps, a post which he held until his death on February 7, 1865.[2]
Encyclopedia Virginia: Winder, John H. (1800–1865)


Richmond Provost
In October 1861, Winder was given command of the newly created Department of Henrico and then, in February 1862, was made provost marshal of Richmond, both of which made much of the capital's day-to-day management his responsibility. As a practical matter, that meant dealing with rampant prostitution, gambling, drinking, and speculation, as well as arresting the numerous deserters and spies who lurked around the city. Winder was frequently accused of not doing enough to clean up Richmond, and then accused of doing too much. In particular, he earned the public's ire for establishing price controls over the city's food supply in an unsuccessful attempt to control inflation, as well as for his frequent declarations of martial law. After a reorganization of his staff in November 1862, the clamor against him somewhat subsided.

The greatest criticism, however, was always reserved for his supervision of the Confederacy's prison system. From March 1862 until September 1863, he oversaw Richmond's military prisons, including the creation of three institutions: Belle Isle, which housed enlisted Union prisoners on an island in the James River; Libby Prison, which held Union officers in an old tobacco warehouse; and Castle Thunder, also a tobacco warehouse, reserved for political prisoners. Winder struggled with the inadequate and uncooperative Confederate commissary to feed and clothe the city's prisoners. While a prisoner-exchange agreement reached between Union and Confederate representatives in 1862 alleviated overcrowding across the South for a short time, the same conditions did not apply to Richmond. Because the capital's railroads made it a crucial prisoner-transfer point, the arrival of thousands of soldiers for exchange only led to even more overcrowding. Accounts of the wretched conditions in Richmond by former Union prisoners filled newspapers in the North, and Winder's name became an abomination.

During the winter of 1863–1864, Union general-in-chief Ulysses S. Grant halted the exchange cartel. He understood that the Confederacy suffered more for missing its prisoners than did the Union, but the official, more politically palatable explanation was the Confederacy's refusal to grant exchange rights to African American troops and their officers. Absent exchanges, the Confederacy was forced to feed, clothe, and accommodate its prisoners for the long term. As the war progressed and resources became more scarce, this became increasingly difficult. The result was Andersonville Prison.
Andersonville

On June 3, 1864, Winder was ordered to assume command of Andersonville, located about 60 miles southwest of Macon, Georgia. By the time of his arrival, 2,200 prisoners from a population of 24,000 had already died. Winder sought to alleviate the overcrowding by enlarging the stockade to twenty-six acres, but his efforts were frustrated by the arrival of even more prisoners, so that by August the prison's population reached its peak of 33,000. By the end of the year, the advance of William T. Sherman's Union forces into Georgia resulted in the transfer of most prisoners, but not before thousands of more deaths occurred. Despite efforts to feed, clothe, and house the prisoners, Winder received much of the blame for the debacle.

On July 26, 1864, Winder was promoted to command of all prisons in Georgia and Alabama. On November 23, Confederate president Jefferson Davis created the office of commissary general of prisons and Winder assumed command of all incarceration points east of the Mississippi River. With his new power, Winder attempted to establish new prisons, reform old ones, and, in general, improve the quality of life for Union prisoners; however, the post came too late in the war for him to successfully implement any dramatic changes. The Confederacy was hard-pressed to feed its own troops, much less its prisoners.

Winder died of a massive heart attack on February 7, 1865, and his death likely saved him from the gallows. His subordinate, Andersonville commandant Henry Wirz, famously was tried and executed following the war, in November 1865. Historians, meanwhile, have debated Winder's culpability in the deaths of thousands of Union prisoners, both in Richmond and at Andersonville. On the one hand, the evidence suggests that although he was hampered by poor-quality prison guards, an inconsistent supply of food, and no central management of the Confederacy's prison system, Winder attempted to treat prisoners well and, as commissary general, greatly reduced the death rate.
 

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Charles Dimmock.

Charles Dimmock: Fifteen years in the U. S. Army, mostly in Artillery and as quartermaster; thirty years as a civilian builder of railroads; Confederate general in the War between the States, defending his home State of Virginia as the Chief of the Ordnance Department.

Historical Information

The Ordnance Department was created by an act of the General Assembly on January 25, 1861. The department was to consist of a colonel of ordnance appointed by the governor and no more than six subordinate officers. Governor Letcher appointed Col. Charles Dimmock, former Commandant of the Public Guard and Superintendent of the Armory, as Colonel of Ordnance. On April 27, 1861, R.S. Garnett, Adjutant-General of the Virginia Forces, submitted General Order No. 3 which charged Dimmock with the duties of assembling and preparing ordnance for Virginia troops in field service. An ordinance was passed on May 1, 1861, placing the department under the control of the major general commanding the military and naval forces of Virginia. After the seizure of the United States Arsenal at Harper's Ferry by Virginia militia under Colonel Turner Ashby on April 18, 1861, all of the weapons, machinery, and stock were confiscated and transported to the Richmond Armory shortly thereafter. The armory was then leased to the Confederate government. The Ordnance Dept. took charge of repairing the armory and manufacturing arms for the war effort. On 15 May 1862, the General Assembly authorized the governor to commission John B. Floyd as a major general in the Virginia State Line. Two and a half million dollars was appropriated for Floyd's ten-thousand-man force. The Ordnance Dept. played an active role in arming Floyd's forces. Floyd's Army was later transferred to Confederate service on 28 February 1863. J.S. Shriver replaced Charles Dimmock as Colonel of Ordnance in October 27 1863 upon his death.
 

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#16
Class of 1822
Walter Gwynn

Military History. — Cadet at the Military Academy, Sep. 10, 1818, to July 1, 1822, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to
Bvt. Second Lieut., 3d Artillery, July 1, 1822.
Second Lieut., 3d Artillery, July 1, 1822.
Served: on Ordnance duty, Aug. 20, 1822, to Nov. 15, 1823; in garrison
(Transferred to 4th Artillery, Feb. 18, 1823)
at Ft. St. Philip, La., 1824, — and at Ft. Monroe, Va. (Artillery School for Practice), 1824‑26; on Topographical duty, Aug. 7, 1826, to
(First Lieut., 4th Artillery, Oct. 19, 1829)
Jun. 19, 1830; and in garrison at Ft. McHenry, Md., 1830.
Resigned, Feb. 2, 1832.
Civil History. — Principal Asst. Engineer, Petersburg and Weldon Railroad, Va., 1832‑33. Postmaster, Jarrett's Station, Va., 1832‑34. Chief Engineer, Portsmouth and Roanoke Railroad, Va., 1833‑36; of Survey for Railroad and Canal from Norfolk, Va., to Edenton, N. C., — and of St. Andrew's Canal, Fla., 1835; of Roanoke, Danville, and Junction Railroad, Va., 1836‑38; of Halifax and Weldon Railroad, N. C., 1835‑38; of Wilmington and Weldon Railroad, N. C., 1836‑40; of the State of North Carolina, 1839‑42; and of Survey for Cape Fear and p281Lumber River Canal, N. C., 1844.

President, Portsmouth and Roanoke Railroad Company, Va., 1842‑46; and of James River and Kanawha Canal Company, Va., 1846‑47. Chief Engineer, James River and Kanawha Canal, Va., 1847‑53; of Wilmington, N. C., and Manchester, S. C., Railroad (including the Great Pee Dee Bridge, supported by cast-iron cylinders, sunk by the pneumatic process), 1848‑55; of North Carolina Railroad from Goldsborough to Charlotte, 1850‑56; of Surveys for Railroads from Goldsborough to Beaufort, N. C., and from Salisbury, N. C., to the Tennessee line, 1853‑55; of Oxford, Md., and Dover, Del., Railroad, 1855‑57; and of Blue Ridge Railroad, from Andersonville, S. C., to Knoxville, Ten., 1856‑61.

Consulting Engineer of various public works in the United States, 1837‑61. Aide-de‑Camp, with the rank of Major, to Major-General McRae, N. C. Militia, 1836‑41. Captain, Virginia Militia, 1842‑49, and Colonel, 1851‑53.

Joined in the Rebellion of 1861-66 against the United States.a
Walter Gwynn
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Confederate States Military
At the start of the Civil War, Gwynn was a major in the engineers of the South Carolina Militia. At the request of the governor, he had accepted the commission and was instrumental in the planning of the attack on Fort Sumter in early 1861 as a member of the Ordnance Board. He was later charged with constructing batteries at various strategic points in Charleston Harbor, facing Fort Sumter.

On April 10, 1861, he accepted a commission as major general of the Virginia Militia and was directed by Virginia governor John Letcher to assume command of the defenses around Norfolk and Portsmouth until mid-May. Working with Gwynn at Norfolk was William Mahone, who was the president of the Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad. Working under Gwynn's authority, Mahone (who was still a civilian) helped bluff the Federal troops into abandoning the Gosport Shipyard in Portsmouth by running a single passenger train into Norfolk with great noise and whistle-blowing, then much more quietly, sending it back west, and then returning the same train again, creating the illusion of large numbers of arriving troops to the Federals listening in Portsmouth across the Elizabeth River (and just barely out of sight). The ruse worked, and not a single Confederate soldier was lost as the Union authorities abandoned the area, and retreated to Fort Monroe across Hampton Roads.

In 1861, Gwynn oversaw construction of defensive fortifications at Sewell's Point, which was across the mouth of Hampton Roads from Fort Monroe at Old Point Comfort. He also participated in the Battle of Big Bethel during the Blockade of the Chesapeake Bay.

Gwynn also served as a brigadier general in the Virginia Provisional Army and then brigadier general in the North Carolina Militia, commanding the Northern Coast Defenses of North Carolina. All of these general-officer assignments were in the spring and summer of 1861.[1]

By August he joined the Confederate States Army as a major of engineers and was promoted to colonel on October 9, 1862.
He resigned from the CSA army in 1863 and became the Comptroller for the State of Florida.
 

jgoodguy

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Class of 1822

Issac R. Trimble
Isaac R. Trimble


302
(Born Va.)
Isaac R. Trimble
(Ap'd Ky.)
17
Isaac Ridgeway Trimble: Born May 15, 1802, Culpeper, VA.
Military History. — Cadet at the Military Academy, Nov. 23, 1818, to July 1, 1822, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to
Bvt. Second Lieut., 3d Artillery, July 1, 1822.
Second Lieut., 1st Artillery, July 1, 1822.
Served: on Ordnance duty, Aug. 21, 1822, to Aug. 1, 1823; in garrison at Ft. Lafayette, N. Y., 1823‑24; on Topographical duty, June 4, 1824, to June 14, 1830; and in garrison at Ft. Monroe, Va. (Artillery School for Practice), 1830‑31.
Resigned, May 31, 1832.

Civil History. — Principal Asst. Engineer, Boston, Mas., and Providence, R. I., Railroad, 1832‑35. Chief Engineer, Baltimore and Susquehanna Railroad, 1835‑38, — of York and Wrightsville Railroad, Pa., 1836‑38, — of Philadelphia, Wilmington, and Baltimore Railroad, and General Superintendent, 1842‑53, — of the Philadelphia and Baltimore p286Central Railroad, 1854‑59, — and of Baltimore and Potomac Railroad, 1859‑61.

Joined in the Rebellion of 1861-66 against the United States.a



Isaac R. Trimble
Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License;



Isaac Ridgeway Trimble (May 15, 1802 – January 2, 1888) was a United States Army officer, a civil engineer, a prominent railroad construction superintendent and executive, and a Confederate general in the American Civil War, most famous for his leadership role in the assault known as Pickett's Charge at the Battle of Gettysburg.

Civil War


At the start of the Civil War, Trimble participated in efforts to restrict the movement of Union troops to Washington, D.C., by burning bridges north of Baltimore. When he realized that Maryland would not secede from the Union, he returned to Virginia and joined the Provisional Army of the state of Virginia as a colonel of engineers in May 1861. He was appointed a brigadier general in the Confederate States Army on August 9, 1861, and was assigned to construct artillery batteries along the Potomac River and later the defenses of Norfolk, Virginia. He was given command in the Army of the Potomac (the predecessor of the Army of Northern Virginia), of a brigade that consisted of regiments from four different states, effectively merging them into a single fighting unit.[3]


Trimble first saw combat as part of Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson's spring 1862 campaign in the Shenandoah Valley. He distinguished himself in the Battle of Cross Keys by fighting off an attack from Union troops under Maj. Gen. John C. Frémont, and then seizing the initiative to counterattack and rout them. During the Seven Days Battles under Jackson outside of Richmond, Virginia, his brigade had few engagements, but they fought hard at Gaines' Mill and he sought to follow up the unsuccessful Confederate assault on Malvern Hill by making a night attack, but his request was refused.[4]
In the Northern Virginia Campaign, Trimble's brigade performed well at the Battle of Cedar Mountain and defeated a Union brigade at Freeman's Ford in mid-August. The brigade marched with Jackson around Maj. Gen. John Pope's main force and Trimble played a major role in the Battle of Manassas Station Operations, seizing a critical supply depot in Pope's rear. Trimble's forced march and action at Manassas Station received praise from Jackson, who said it was "the most brilliant that has come under my observation during the present war." Pope was forced by this maneuver into attacking Jackson's strong defensive positions and suffered a severe defeat in the Second Battle of Bull Run. Trimble was wounded in the leg during the battle on August 29, resulting in an injury so severe that there was speculation that he was hit with an explosive bullet.[5]

Although Trimble avoided the amputation of his wounded leg, his rehabilitation proceeded slowly. For months after, doctors periodically found bone fragments that had to be extracted. By November, he developed camp erysipelas and a probable case of osteomyelitis, and his ambitions for elevation to division command were on hold until he was well enough to return to active duty. He made his desire for promotion abundantly clear to his colleagues, and in one instance before the army moved north to Manassas, he was quoted as saying (probably humorously), "General Jackson, before this war is over, I intend to be a Major General or a corpse!"[6] Jackson wrote a strong letter of recommendation, although he tempered it by including the sentence "I do not regard him as a good disciplinarian." Trimble engaged in a letterwriting campaign from his sick bed to obtain his promotion and to challenge Jackson's claim. He wrote to Adjutant General Samuel Cooper, "If I am to have promotion I want it at once and I particularly request, that my date may be from 26th August, the date of the capture of Manassas." (During this period Trimble also feuded with Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart about their conflicting reports of the battle and who bore primary responsibility for the seizure of the Union supply depot.)[7]
Trimble was eventually promoted to major general on January 17, 1863, and assigned to the command of Jackson's old division, but he continued to be unable to command in the field due to his health. At the Battle of Chancellorsville Brig. Gen. Raleigh E. Colston, as the senior brigadier general, commanded Trimble's division. A recurrence of illness forced him to turn over his division command in the Second Corps to Maj. Gen. Edward "Allegheny" Johnson and he was assigned to light duty as commander of the Valley District in the Shenandoah Valley on May 28, 1863.[8]

By June 1863, Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia had crossed the Potomac River in the Gettysburg Campaign. Trimble was desperate to get back into action, particularly because he was familiar with the area from his railroad days. He joined Lee's headquarters unsolicited, and wore out his welcome hanging around without formal assignment. Riding north, he caught up with Lt. Gen. Richard S. Ewell on the way to Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and joined his staff as a supernumerary, or senior officer without a command. He and Ewell quarreled frequently due to this clumsy arrangement and Trimble's lack of tact.[9]

At the Battle of Gettysburg, Ewell's Second Corps reached the battlefield in the early afternoon of the first day, July 1, 1863, smashing into the Union XI Corps and driving it south through the town to Cemetery Hill. Trimble wrote the following about his encounter with Ewell:
The battle was over and we had won it handsomely. General Ewell moved about uneasily, a good deal excited, and seemed to me to be undecided what to do next. I approached him and said: "Well, General, we have had a grand success; are you not going to follow it up and push our advantage?"
He replied that General Lee had instructed him not to bring on a general engagement without orders, and that he would wait for them.
I said, "That hardly applies to the present state of things, as we have fought a hard battle already, and should secure the advantage gained". He made no rejoinder, but was far from composure. I was deeply impressed with the conviction that it was a critical moment for us and made a remark to that effect.
As no movement seemed immediate, I rode off to our left, north of the town, to reconnoitre, and noticed conspicuously the wooded hill northeast of Gettysburg (Culp's), and a half mile distant, and of an elevation to command the country for miles each way, and overlooking Cemetery Hill above the town. Returning to see General Ewell, who was still under much embarrassment, I said, "General, There," pointing to Culp's Hill, "is an eminence of commanding position, and not now occupied, as it ought to be by us or the enemy soon. I advise you to send a brigade and hold it if we are to remain here." He said: "Are you sure it commands the town?" [I replied,] "Certainly it does, as you can see, and it ought to be held by us at once." General Ewell made some impatient reply, and the conversation dropped.
— Isaac R. Trimble, Southern Historical Society Papers[10]
Observers have reported that the "impatient reply" was, "When I need advice from a junior officer I generally ask for it." They also stated that Trimble threw down his sword in disgust and stormed off. A more colorful version of this account has been immortalized in Michael Shaara's novel, The Killer Angels.[11]

On July 3, 1863, Trimble was one of the three division commanders in Pickett's Charge. He stepped in to replace Maj. Gen. W. Dorsey Pender, of Lt. Gen. A.P. Hill's corps, who was mortally wounded the previous day. Trimble was at a great disadvantage because he had never worked with these troops before. His division participated in the left section of the assault, advancing just behind the division led by Brig. Gen. J. Johnston Pettigrew (formerly by Maj. Gen. Henry Heth). Trimble rode his horse, Jinny, and was wounded in the left leg, the same leg hit at Second Bull Run. Despite feeling faint, the 61-year-old general was able to walk back to the Confederate line on Seminary Hill. His leg was amputated by Dr. Hunter McGuire, and Trimble could not be taken along with the retreating Confederates, because of fear of infection that would result from a long ambulance ride back to Virginia, so he was left under the care of a family in Gettysburg on July 6 as the army withdrew. Trimble complained bitterly that if his leg had been amputated at Second Bull Run, the bullet would have missed him on this occasion. He was treated in the Seminary Hospital at Gettysburg until August. Of the charge on the third day of Gettysburg, Trimble said: "If the men I had the honor to command that day could not take that position, all hell couldn't take it."[12]

Gettysburg marked the end of Trimble's military career. He spent the next year and a half in Federal hands at Johnson's Island and Fort Warren. He was recommended for parole soon after capture, but former U.S. Secretary of War Simon Cameron recommended against it, citing Trimble's expert knowledge of northern railroads. In March 1865, Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant ordered Trimble to be sent to City Point, Virginia, for exchange, but by the time he reached there, Robert E. Lee's army was already retreating in the Appomattox Campaign. Trimble was finally paroled in Lynchburg, Virginia, on April 16, 1865, just after Lee's surrender.[13]




Gen. Isaac R. Trimble in Captivity


Expired Image Removed


On September 3 Trimble excoriated the Fort McHenry bill of fare. “We now receive food, if food it can be called, from the hospital—chunks of dark beef in a greasy tin pan, two slices f bread steeped in split coffee and two tin cups of dark liquid for coffee, is our meal—no butter, no vegetable, no salt or pepper no condiment to seduce the appetite, to devour such trash—but for Balto. ladies we should starve or become skeletons by inches.” He also noted, “It seems I am specially prohibited from seeing any one by orders from Washington.” The general’s only amusement was “to walk around the interior of the fort—look at any kind ladies who bring us fruit & delicacies; and read.” He was still on crutches, his leg having been measured for an artificial one, “to be done in 3 weeks.”

 

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Daniel S. Donelson

edit added the Cullum's entry.

Daniel S. Donelson
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Gazetteer/Places/America/United_States/Army/USMA/Cullums_Register/396*.html
396
(Born Ten.)
Daniel S. Donelson
(Ap'd Ten.)
5
Daniel Smith Donelson: Born June 23, 1801, Sumner County, TN.
Military History. — Cadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1821, to July 1, 1825, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to
Second Lieut., 3d Artillery, July 1, 1825.
On leave of absence, July 1, 1825, to Jan. 22, 1826.
Resigned, Jan. 22, 1826.
Civil History. — Brigade Major, Tennessee Militia, 1827‑29, — and p343Brig.‑General, 1829‑34. Member of the House of Representatives of the State of Tennessee, 1841‑43, and 1855‑61; and Speaker of the House of Representatives, 1859‑61. Planter, Sumner County, Ten., 1826‑34, — in Florida Territory, 1834‑36, — and Sumner County, Ten., 1836‑61.
Joined in the Rebellion of 1861-66 against the United States.a
Died, Apr. 17, 1863, in Eastern Tennessee:b Aged 61.
Buried, Hendersonville Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Hendersonville, TN.
Daniel Smith Donelson

Daniel Smith Donelson (June 23, 1801 – April 17, 1863) was a Tennessee politician and a Confederate general during the American Civil War.
Civil War
With the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861, Donelson volunteered for the Tennessee militia, leaving behind both of his careers as a planter and as Speaker of the Tennessee House of Representatives. He was returned to his previous rank of brigadier general in the militia and that May approved the location of Fort Donelson, which was named in his honor. After Tennessee joined the Confederacy, he became a brigadier general in the Confederate Army on July 9, 1861. In the following two years, Donelson was active in several campaigns, leading the initial assault at the Battle of Perryville, fighting at the Battle of Stones River, and eventually rising to command of the Department of East Tennessee.
Donelson was promoted to major general on March 5, 1863 (to rank from January 17); his confirmation by the confederate senate on April 22 happened prior to knowledge of his death, which had occurred a week earlier. He died of chronic diarrhea in Montvale Springs, near Knoxville, Tennessee. He was buried in the Presbyterian Cemetery in Hendersonville, Tennessee.[3]
 



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