Real Lincoln letter?


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LoyaltyOfDogs

First Sergeant
Joined
Aug 8, 2011
Messages
1,351
Location
Gettysburg area
#5
Does anyone know when Presidents started using secretaries to sign letters/memos for them? I think Jefferson had some sort of mechanical rig that held a pencil for duplicate signings.
I think this polygraph is the device you're thinking of, @NH Civil War Gal. According to the website, it appears to have been in mass production in the US around the time Jefferson acquired his first one. It would be interesting to know if its use caught on with later presidents.
 
#6
Does anyone know when Presidents started using secretaries to sign letters/memos for them? I think Jefferson had some sort of mechanical rig that held a pencil for duplicate signings.
You know, now that you mention it, Lincoln or one of his secretaries could have used an autopen type machine to sign that. I know that Secretary of War Stanton used one to sign a number of military discharges such as the Squirrel Hunters discharges.
 

Specster

Sergeant Major
Joined
Sep 19, 2014
Messages
2,024
Location
Mass.
#7
I kind of doubt it. He had second note by George Washington like a short shopping list and the handwriting on the 2 were very similar. 2/3s of the way down each the ink changes from blue to almost black The paper was in a cellophane sleeve and the paper looked very similar. A bunch of red flags
 
#10
Looks like another of ol "honest Abe's" lies..... :frantic:


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" How is the name signed? Lincoln signed “Abraham Lincoln” on formal documents as President. He signed 'A. Lincoln' on letters. As an attorney, he sometimes just signed his last name, “Lincoln.” If the document in question is not one of these, beware. And if it reads 'Abe' or 'Old Abe' or 'Honest Abe,' you can save yourself the time. He did not use these."
How The Experts Know If That Abraham Lincoln Autograph Is Authentic
 

Viper21

Sergeant Major
Joined
Jul 4, 2016
Messages
2,325
Location
Rockbridge County, Virginia
#11
" How is the name signed? Lincoln signed “Abraham Lincoln” on formal documents as President. He signed 'A. Lincoln' on letters. As an attorney, he sometimes just signed his last name, “Lincoln.” If the document in question is not one of these, beware. And if it reads 'Abe' or 'Old Abe' or 'Honest Abe,' you can save yourself the time. He did not use these."
How The Experts Know If That Abraham Lincoln Autograph Is Authentic
I guess you didn't read the text I was responding to..? I simply responded to the statement I quoted.

Having said that, the statements you make aren't absolutes either. The same collection where I found the docs I included show some official presidential actions signed "A. Lincoln" as well as Abraham spelled out. https://www.raabcollection.com/presidents-autographs/abraham-lincoln-autograph

None of which is a big deal. My 1st post was merely a jab at "Honest Abe" from the statement of JimKlag. I really could care less how Lincoln signed anything to be honest. I don't worship Lincoln at all, & wouldn't pay $5 for the documents listed in the tens of thousands (or more) bearing his signature in any form :smug:


** ok. My last statement might not be entirely true. I WOULD pay $5 for any of the authenticated Lincoln signed docs. However, my only purpose would be to sell them for maximum profit to a Lincoln collector.
 
#12
I guess you didn't read the text I was responding to..? I simply responded to the statement I quoted.

Having said that, the statements you make aren't absolutes either. The same collection where I found the docs I included show some official presidential actions signed "A. Lincoln" as well as Abraham spelled out. https://www.raabcollection.com/presidents-autographs/abraham-lincoln-autograph

None of which is a big deal. My 1st post was merely a jab at "Honest Abe" from the statement of JimKlag. I really could care less how Lincoln signed anything to be honest. I don't worship Lincoln at all, & wouldn't pay $5 for the documents listed in the tens of thousands (or more) bearing his signature in any form :smug:


** ok. My last statement might not be entirely true. I WOULD pay $5 for any of the authenticated Lincoln signed docs. However, my only purpose would be to sell them for maximum profit to a Lincoln collector.
I did read Jimklag's comment that you responded to and it was not Lincoln who claimed that his full signature was signed only on the Emancipation Proclamation. I thought the article about Lincoln's signatures would be of interest to those who might think he signed "A. Lincoln" to everything else. Also, I don't believe the author of the article stated in absolute terms that Lincoln only signed his full name on formal documents as president but rather was talking generally about each type of his signatures. And you're right, it is no big deal.
 

Specster

Sergeant Major
Joined
Sep 19, 2014
Messages
2,024
Location
Mass.
#15
" How is the name signed? Lincoln signed “Abraham Lincoln” on formal documents as President. He signed 'A. Lincoln' on letters. As an attorney, he sometimes just signed his last name, “Lincoln.” If the document in question is not one of these, beware. And if it reads 'Abe' or 'Old Abe' or 'Honest Abe,' you can save yourself the time. He did not use these."
How The Experts Know If That Abraham Lincoln Autograph Is Authentic

The "auctioneer" was going on and on about how this guy has been collecting for decades and that he has over 4000 documents. Knowing the auctioneer as much as seeing the documents, I thought it was a laugh from the get go. Anytime you preview an auction and the owner gets real uncomfortable and angry when you pull our jewelers loops, magnets and magnifying glasses, rest assured its a fake - like it is your fault for doing due diligence. Yet I know zip about signatures and wanted to run it by the experts. Its good to feel vindicated. The sad side of the story is that many people believed it was real and were ready to pay several thousand (he estimated $4000 or more).
 



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