What is this? Ramrod identification if possible

Jubylives

Cadet
Joined
Feb 28, 2021
This ramrod is 33 inches long and came with an austrian model 1844 kammerbuchse turned into a shotgun. Just curious if this came from a different firearm or is home made. Numbers stamped into it make me think it was from another firearm but I am not knowledgeable about these. Thanks for any info or thoughts.

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tbuckley

Sergeant
Joined
Jul 13, 2015
In the middle picture it looks like the end of the ramrod is two piece. If it is, is the end of the ramrod iron or brass?
 

Don Dixon

Sergeant
Joined
Oct 24, 2008
Location
Fairfax, VA, USA
It is a ramrod from a Kammerbüchse. The format and position of the numbers and letters below the head of the ramrod are consistent with Austrian Army regulations of the period. It was the 15th Kammerbüchse assigned to the 3rd or 8th ____ ____. I don't know what "C.N." stands for. Matching marks should be found on the left breech forward of the chamber section and on the top of the butt plate. From your photo it looks like the head was shortened by 1/4 - 1/3 of an inch; perhaps because it was damaged or to reduce its weight. You didn't need to smack the ball to expand it into the rifling grooves in a shotgun. Austrian practice called for it to be made of steel.

Regards,
Don Dixon
 
Last edited:

Jubylives

Cadet
Joined
Feb 28, 2021
It is a ramrod from a Kammerbüchse. The format and position of the numbers and letters below the head of the ramrod are consistent with Austrian Army regulations of the period. It was the 15th Kammerbüchse assigned to the 3rd or 8th ____ ____. I don't know what "C.N." stands for. Matching marks should be found on the left breech forward of the chamber section and on the top of the butt plate. From your photo it looks like the head was shortened by 1/4 - 1/3 of an inch; perhaps because it was damaged or to reduce its weight. You didn't need to smack the ball to expand it into the rifling grooves in a shotgun. Austrian practice called for it to be made of steel.

Regards,
Don Dixon
Thank you. Always fun learning something new. I am glad it is a ramrod for the gun. Appears the gun is matching to most of the parts. Even the stock has a matching number written in pencil under the buttplate. Too bad it met the fate it did though. Jeremy
 

Story

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Aug 5, 2011
Location
SE PA
If you decide to fully restore it, you might want to ask these people if their stock supplier can do just a foreend.
 

Jubylives

Cadet
Joined
Feb 28, 2021
If you decide to fully restore it, you might want to ask these people if their stock supplier can do just a foreend.
I've checked that site. This will need a lot more then I can financially commit to it to get it back to original condition. Stock and new barrel in itself is beyond my reach to put into it. Even though I would very much like to.
 

Story

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Aug 5, 2011
Location
SE PA
I've checked that site. This will need a lot more then I can financially commit to it to get it back to original condition. Stock and new barrel in itself is beyond my reach to put into it. Even though I would very much like to.

Just a suggestion, but consider it like a Johnny Cash Cadillac ("one piece at a time").

Bobby Hoyt (out past Gettysburg PA) can reline the barrel you have so it's rifled again.

The Rifle Shoppe is slow to fill orders anyways.

A forearm is a fraction of a replacement stock.

After a year or three of collecting parts (at a rate you can afford), you can put them all together.
 

Jubylives

Cadet
Joined
Feb 28, 2021
All I'm doing so far is more conservation I suppose. Stopping the rust and oil and getting rid of the crusty and flaky stuff used to coat the stock. Haven't decided what to use on the wood yet. Not a particularly attractive piece of wood with little visible grain to it. After that probably sit on it for now until I decide what I can do with it further if anything.
 
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