Question on Jackson's Relationship w/ Maxcy Gregg and A.P. Hill


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diane

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He sure wasn't an easy guy to work for, that's for certain! I believe the problems between Gregg and Jackson happened when Gregg was in command of the 1st SC brigade in A P Hill's Light Division. They got into mischief about tearing up some fences to get at some apples despite Jackson's firm orders to leave civilian property alone. So, he arrested Gregg...which brought about the arrest of Little Powell, who protested his very effective subordinate being up for court-martial... and it went downhill from there! There was a whole skeleton closet of matters between Hill and 'that crazy Presbyterian' - this was just another.
 

luinrina

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Source: James Robertson, Jr. "Stonewall Jackson - The Man, The Soldier, The Legend"

Yes, he did - with both officers and several times. Jackson often arrested subordinate officers; during the march to Harpers Ferry for instance Alexander Lawton was the only one of three division commanders then not under arrest (p. 594).

With Gregg Jackson clashed over hungry men taking apples from an orchard without authorization and using fence rails for firewood in direct disobedience of orders, over Jackson arresting Colonel Daniel Hamilton of the 1st South Carolina when the men couldn't fire their muskets as promptly as Jackson wished, and when Jackson arrested two of Gregg's regimental colonels for allowing men to break ranks to pick apples from trees, Gregg filed charges against Jackson (p. 585, 594, 625-626, 639).

Hill and Jackson clashed among other things about confusion in marching because of changed orders (p. 524) and over Hill being arrested and removed from command at the beginning of the Maryland Campaign "for disobedience of orders" (p. 585). The latter smarted Hill greatly, so he demanded an immediate resolution. Jackson explained the circumstances and that "the object in arresting Genl. Hill, which was to secure his stricter compliance with orders, has been effected, I do not consider further action on my part necessary" (p. 627). That didn't suffice for Hill so things went downhill from there to Hill demanding a formal hearing and Jackson submitting charges.

Robertson wrote on p. 519, when Hill's Light Division was assigned to Jackson after the Seven Days:

"Little Powell," nurtured in Virginia Piedmont aristocracy, was high spirited, impetuous, and proud. Jackson, an orphan from the mountains, was a loner, sensitive, and stern. Lee had no way of knowing that an enmity, bred between Jackson and Hill at West Point, had burst into flames on the peninsula. Hill thought Jackson criminally derelict for his tardiness at Mechanicsville, Gaines' Mill, and Glendale.​

I think that in essence captures the difficulties the two men had with each other.

Hope that helps! :smile:
 
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Ole Miss

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Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson was a difficult man to work for and with. Enlisted soldiers never took offense like many of the officers who considered personal honor to rule above all other emotions. Jackson was a stone cold killer who could have given a fig for "hotheads" who sought redress through duels. Dyspeptic vs Fractious.
Regards
David
 

diane

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Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson was a difficult man to work for and with. Enlisted soldiers never took offense like many of the officers who considered personal honor to rule above all other emotions. Jackson was a stone cold killer who could have given a fig for "hotheads" who sought redress through duels. Dyspeptic vs Fractious.
Regards
David
Yes, Jackson was a killer, and Gregg's death produced one of Jackson's famous quotes. He and Dr McGuire were riding back to Jackson's headquarters after seeing Gregg - Jackson and Gregg made up before the latter died. Jackson stopped a moment and looked up at the sky. "How horrible is war!" he abruptly exclaimed. McGuire replied, "Horrible, yes, but we have been invaded. What are we to do?" Jackson shot back, "Kill them, sir! Kill every one of them!"
 

Ole Miss

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Jackson and Forrest were like minded men who knew War meant Killing and Killing meant winning. Popinjays and Coxcombs like Custer and Kilpatrick were ****ed fools searching for fame and glory while the Jacksons and Forrests were focusing on winning. War was a deadly serious matter and not a game. It would have been very interesting if Forrest could have been Jackson's cavalry leader in a campaign in the Shenandoah Valley Campaign. Of course this concept presupposes the 2 would have been able to get along.
Regards
David
 

diane

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#8
Jackson and Forrest were like minded men who knew War meant Killing and Killing meant winning. Popinjays and Coxcombs like Custer and Kilpatrick were ****ed fools searching for fame and glory while the Jacksons and Forrests were focusing on winning. War was a deadly serious matter and not a game. It would have been very interesting if Forrest could have been Jackson's cavalry leader in a campaign in the Shenandoah Valley Campaign. Of course this concept presupposes the 2 would have been able to get along.
Regards
David
That would have been an interesting combination! Jackson would have recognized Forrest's true abilities very quickly and would have known how to use him. He would have been superb in the Valley. The problem would have been Jackson's love of secrets. Forrest needed to know straight forward - what do you want me to do? Now, out of my way I'll get it done. That's a quality Jackson valued but he'd have to tell his cavalry chief his secrets or Forrest would do as he saw fit. He would not have been in the position Ewell found himself, sitting in the middle of a road he was told to go to and, when asked now what? all he could do was screech, "I don't know!" Forrest would have made a decision...and there's where the trouble with his superior might come in. Like Jackson, Forrest was dedicated to Southern independence and was an aggressive commander who knew, like Lincoln as well, one doesn't win a war with elderflowers and rose water.
 



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